Why is my 1981 Toyota Pickup burning coolant

My truck began burning coolant so i suspected it was the head gasket. I removed the engine and took the head off. The surface of the block was then cleaned. I put a new head gasket in place and a new timing chain set. The head has been resurfaced and bolted back on with the original bolts. Once I started it back up it was still burning coolant. So I took the head off again and got it checked for cracks. It did not have any. I have no idea what the problem is. Engine is the original 22R with 5 speed transmission.

-Kyle

My car has 200000 miles.
My car has a manual transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hi there. If the engine continues to burn coolant then you may have a warped block or there are a few other places where coolant can enter the engine. I have seen cracks in the timing cover and in the intake manifold that can cause this. I usually need to pressurize the cooling system and use a camera to check these areas to find the leak. Some of the time I must also use dye in order to find it. If you need some help with this, consider using YourMechanic, as a certified mechanic can come to you to [diagnose where the coolant is being lost] https://www.yourmechanic.com/services/coolant-is-leaking-inspection

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced mechanics :

Coolant that is trying to travel over an overheating engine can end up burning up on the block as the temperatures from both sides collide into generating even more heat.
Coolant can also burn internally if it is leaking into the combustion process. Heavy white vapor from the tailpipe indicates you may have a bad head gasket, and if you see this you should stop driving the vehicle and get it to the shop immediately before further damage occurs.
Providing that the engine is running well, with no leakages or damage, you can expect a coolant loss of 0.25% every four to six months. This means a loss of two to three ounces a year is completely normal.
Antifreeze leaks can be caused by a variety of things but the two most common factors are age and dirty coolant. Dirt or oil in your coolant can accelerate wear in your system, leading to leaks in your water pumps, at gaskets, or at o-rings. Flushing your cooling system is the best way to stop this type of leak.
If the coolant level is dropping and there is no external leak evident, then the coolant is probably leaking internally, into the engine. If the car has recently overheated then this could have caused the head gasket to fail. If it has, it could be leaking coolant into the combustion chambers.
One way to tell is by looking at the color of the smoke coming from the vehicle`s exhaust pipe. If the smoke is white, it`s probably just water vapor and not coolant. But if the smoke is blue or black, that`s a good indication that your car is burning coolant.
Thick white exhaust smoke indicates a coolant leak, which could cause overheating and put your engine at serious risk of damage.
Technically speaking yes you can use plain water in your cooling system but it isn`t recommended as a long term solution and certainly not in extreme weather conditions.
Yes, engine coolant does go bad. Older fluid may cause acid buildup, may become contaminated by rust or scaling, and may have reduced resistance to boiling and freezing. Deteriorated coolant/antifreeze may cause your engine to run hotter than normal or keep the engine from starting in colder temperatures.
Too much coolant will not cause overheating. But if the ratio of antifreeze is above optimal then the engine will overheat.
Coolant Leaks

Oftentimes when the thermostat fails, it remains in its closed position. As the engine overheats, coolant will overflow out of the thermostat housing. This means that coolant leaking out of your engine could be a sign that your thermostat has gone bad.

Engine Smoking

Leaking Coolant – If you see white smoke under the hood, it`s most likely burning coolant that has come into contact with the hot components beneath your hood. This smoke will smell sweet.

Fresh antifreeze is a clear brightly coloured liquid, usually blue, red, green, violet, yellow or orange but this will vary depending on the manufacturer`s formulation. Over time, your coolant will become dirty losing its colour and becoming darker, often an oxidized shade of brown.
What colour do you need? Green coolant is the conventional coolant (Ethylene Glycol base) and is the most popularly used coolant. Red coolant typically has a base of Organic Acid Technology which is designed to be more suitable for aluminium radiators.
If you don`t have coolant available, you should top up your radiator with the highest quality water that you have. Ideally, this would be distilled water. You can also use bottled water or tap water.
Whining or Groaning Noise

A whining or groaning noise usually means that either a drive belt is loose, or the water pump pulley is bad. It may surprise your customer that a pulley could fail, but it does occasionally happen. Pulleys have been known to fail due to rust, which can cause cracking between their bolt holes.

When a water pump completely fails, it is no longer able to move coolant through the engine; this causes it to overheat. If you see steam, pull over immediately and call your mechanic for assistance — continuing to drive with an overheated engine can damage it to the point that it will need to be completely replaced.
If your coolant reservoir is boiling but your engine doesn`t overheat, then your coolant may not actually be too hot. Those bubbles you noticed are more likely air bubbles that found their way into the coolant reservoir—not from the piping hot coolant. In most cases, the issue is actually a leak in the radiator cap.
If the radiator cap is stuck, fluid cannot get released. This will cause pressure to build inside of the radiator, causing the hose to leak or break open. If you notice coolant near the radiator or the radiator cap, then you clearly have leaky coolant.
Older vehicles are known for overheating because they`ve got old cooling system parts and some cooling systems and vehicle engines are not designed for today`s driving.
The maximum level is below the top of the tank. That allows for possible expansion of the coolant in the system. If you fill it beyond the maximum level, probably at some point the excess overflows out the overflow tube of the reservoir as the coolant from the radiator expands into the reservoir.
If the temperature gauge consistently shows the engine is warmer than normal, have your cooling system checked ASAP. There are many possible reasons that your engine is running hot, including low coolant levels, a clogged or closed thermostat, a failed head gasket or a water pump malfunction.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

No coolant in the reservoir. Seen low coolant message. I added 2 quarts of 50/50 coolant. Still getting the message. How much coolant doe it need?
ANSWER : Hi there. For the coolant light to go out, you would need to have the coolant between the low line and the full line for the light to go out. If the coolant is low and keeps on being low, then look for any signs of coolant leaks. You may have to use a coolant pressure tester to pressurize the reservoir to allow the leak to be found.

If you need further assistance with the coolant being low and the warning light being on, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

Why is my 1981 Toyota Pickup burning coolant
ANSWER : Hi there. If the engine continues to burn coolant then you may have a warped block or there are a few other places where coolant can enter the engine. I have seen cracks in the timing cover and in the intake manifold that can cause this. I usually need to pressurize the cooling system and use a camera to check these areas to find the leak. Some of the time I must also use dye in order to find it. If you need some help with this, consider using YourMechanic, as a certified mechanic can come to you to [diagnose where the coolant is being lost] https://www.yourmechanic.com/services/coolant-is-leaking-inspection

Over heating coolant not siphoning back into coolant over flow tank
ANSWER : Hey there:

It’s common for many mechanics to make the mistake of mis-diagnosing the cause of an overheating situation; especially when they assume it’s a thermostat issue. The problem could be caused by a blockage in the coolant tubes running from the radiator to the overflow tank and back to the radiator. However, it also may be due to air trapped in the coolant lines. I think a good idea would be to contact a different ASE certified mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, and have them complete a coolant flush, which should remove any blockages in the coolant tubes and may solve your problem.

I have a 2002 toyota camry LE engine wich i want to use on a 2004 toyota camry XLE .is my 02 toyota camry engine compatible ?
ANSWER : Hi there. Assuming that both engines are the same size, the compatibility of "fitting" should be OK. However, since this is a service we don’t offer, we’re not best suited to provide the best advice on this. I can tell you that a common problem have with replacing motors is communication with the ECU. In most cases, it will require reprogramming by a specialist in order for all the systems to work correctly.

The coolant on a 2003 Forester keeps leaking and burning on the left side by the alternator. Only burn when full
ANSWER : Hi there. Based on the location of the alternator on the Subaru Forester, it’s quite possible that the leak is coming from one of the multiple coolant lines and bypass lines that are located directly next to or over the alternator. Usually if you have a coolant leak that only occurs when the coolant is "full", it comes from either the radiator cap, the coolant temperature sensor location or the overflow reservoir. As coolant gets hot, it expands which is why it’s recommended to run a 50/50 ratio of coolant to distilled water. It’s a good idea to have a professional mobile mechanic come to your location and complete a coolant leak inspection, so they can find the source of the leak and recommend repairs, before this turns into a more serious situation.

can i istall a 1999 toyota pickup 2.7 engine into a 1996 toyota pickup and use the 1996 wiring and ignition?
ANSWER : According to the Toyota parts catalog, the short block used in the Tacoma from 1995 to 2004 is identical. That is, all those model years carry the same Toyota catalog part number, namely 1140075061. However, the cylinder head (the casting) in your present engine was only used from 1995 through 1997 (Toyota part number 1110179106). Note that 1997 is the last year a distributor was used in the Tacoma and that "may" account for a change in the casting, hence the 1997 cutoff for the head. I see though that the camshafts, valves and everything else installed on the cylinder head casting appears identical well beyond 1997-1999. Inasmuch as the short block IS identical for 1996 and 1999 what you could do, if there is no provision for a distributor in the 1999 engine, is simply unbolt the head from your 1996 engine (if still good of course) and attach it to the 1999 short block for a complete engine.

Inasmuch as you need an exact match (the engine is computer controlled; anything you use as an interchange for your 1996 MUST be exact in EVERY respect, otherwise you will have computer problems), another possibility is to simply conduct an interchange search at Car-Part.com. I looked up your 1996 application and I see quite a few exact engine interchanges for your 1996 engine listed at that website. If you are interested in an engine replacement, YourMechanic professionals in certain locales can assist with that. Please simply inquire based on your locale. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic.

Possible coolant in my oil but no oil in the coolant. Use about 1 l of coolant per 100km.
ANSWER : Check the transmission fluid. If all testing eliminates the head gasket, cracked cylinder head, etc, it may be a cracked radiator.Transmission fluid is sent forward to the radiator to be cooled. Ir runs into what is typically called the "side tanks" of the radiator. So the transmission fluid and coolant are both flowing through the radiator and kept apart just as the engine oil and coolant are kept apart in the engine by the head gasket, coolant and oil passages, etc. If the tank in the radiator is cracked internally, transmission fluid may actually be forced into the coolant as transmission fluid is under higher pressure than the coolant. Short of a cracked head gasket, cylinder head, or engine block, it’s really the only other source of any type of oil getting into the coolant unless the vehicle is equipped with an engine oil cooler as well.

My 03 Mercedes CLK 55 AMG. It has coolant but it said ‘check coolant’ in the dashboard
ANSWER : Hi. Unless you are having to repeatedly refill the coolant system – which indicates a different problem, the false "low coolant" issue may simply be a failed sensor in the coolant recovery tank. It is not recognizing that there is adequate fluid in the tank. The scenario you describe where the car will not start after being driven, then parked suggests a "heat-soak" issue for an electrical component (crank/cam position sensor, starter solenoid, neutral safety switch, etc.). If you would like to have this looked at, a certified technician from YourMechanic can diagnose the starting issue and follow through with repairs.