whinning noise

I just had my power steering pump replaced. But there is still winning under the hood. What else could it be? I also replaced serpentine belt last week it seems to whine louder when I accelerate

My car has 119000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hi there. In most cases, when the engine makes a whining noise that increases as your vehicle accelerates, it’s caused by a drive, serpentine or alternator belt or the belt’s pulleys. It’s possible that your serpentine belt was replaced that it was not properly tightened. You might want to have a professional mobile mechanic come to your location and complete a car is making a noise inspection so they can pinpoint the source of the noise and recommend the right repairs.

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Common reasons for this to happen:

Low Transmission Fluid: For both manual and automatic transmissions, the primary cause for whining when in gear is low transmission fluid. If the fluid is too low, then the internal components of the transmission are not lubricated properly.

While the transmission is the most likely cause, whining while accelerating can also be caused by low power steering fluid or more serious damage like faulty alternator bearings, a malfunctioning water pump, a broken piston or a bad AC compressor.
Transmission issues are the primary suspect when your car is making a whining noise. The whining can come from your transmission when gears begin to wear down from constant use, or the transmission fluid is running low from a leak.
The drive belt is what drives various components such as the alternator and power steering system. If the drive belt becomes loose, it will produce a loud whining or squealing noise as you drive. Loose drive belts should be tightened as soon as possible.
A humming or whining noise in an automatic transmission vehicle often means that you are low on automatic transmission fluid. If this is the case, you want to refill that fluid immediately. Transmission fluid reduces friction, which means heat, which in turn is bad news for transmissions.
A damaged fuel pump might make a loud, whining sound that you`ll hear from your gas tank. The pump may also make this noise if you`re low on fuel or the fuel in your tank is contaminated. The normal noise your pump makes is a low hum. Loud whining indicates there is a problem.
Noise. Your fuel pump always makes a low humming sound, but usually, you can`t hear it. If you hear a loud whining noise coming from your gas tank, the fuel pump is going bad. This is also a sign that the gas tank is dirty and contaminated.
There may be trouble if you suddenly notice a whining noise from your torque converter. This whining noise implies that the pump within the torque converter is no longer functioning as designed. The noise could imply that the blade assembly no longer receives enough fluid.
Your car`s clutch is going bad. This whining noise that appears at a particular rpm band (mostly early) means that the clutch is slipping.
The Vortec 3500 I5 (and its sister engines) have proven to be fairly reliable and trouble-free — with one exception. The factory valve seats in some 2004 to 2006 SUVs with the 2800 or 3500 engines apparently were not up to the normal hardness standards and may experience a premature wear problem.
The truck has been very reliable. The truck gets excellent mileage as well. The 5 cylinder engine gets great gas mileage along with being powerful enough to haul big loads. Like the dependability of this truck.
8 car owners like you reviewed their 2006 Chevrolet Colorado. The average rating is a 3.5 out of 5 stars. The 2006 Chevrolet Colorado Reliability Rating is 3.5 out of 5. It ranks 20th out of 32 for all car brands.
Transmission fluid ensures that the gears shift smoothly, but there will be a clunking sound in manual transmissions and whining sounds from automatic ones if it is low. In such a case, we recommend taking the car to an expert or technician who can pinpoint exactly why the sound is there.
The intrusive noise known as gear whine is caused by vibrations generated by gears as they mesh as a result of imperfections caused by design, loading, temperature effects, and manufacturing variations.
A noisy manual transmission might last anywhere from a few more seconds to many years. It depends on how much damage is done before the driver stops the car, and has it checked, and refilled with lubricant. If a person has problems shifting their manual vehicle, could it be because of a fluid leak in the transmission?
Contaminated Fuel Filter

This causes the fuel pump to work harder than normal, which creates a loud buzzing or humming noise. Other signs of a clogged fuel filter include: Engine starts hard. Engine running rough.

Should the whining noise of your transmission continue whenever your vehicle is in gear, this can mean there is a problem occurring in your torque converter. Check to see if the noise desists when you shift the vehicle to park or neutral. A constant whining noise when your car is in gear needs professional attention.
Rattling is one sound you want to be aware of. If you hear odd rattling sounds when you accelerate, this might be a symptom of a bad torque converter. The same can be true of whirring noises.
Should the whining noise of your transmission continue whenever your vehicle is in gear, this can mean there is a problem occurring in your torque converter. Check to see if the noise desists when you shift the vehicle to park or neutral. A constant whining noise when your car is in gear needs professional attention.
Since the whine increases with road speed and acceleration, it means the ring gear (or pinion) is loose enough through wear that the power over 3000 RPM, or the power to push past higher road speeds (air resistance) accentuate the wear pattern on ring & pinion gears and bearings in the differential (rear).
Should the whining noise of your transmission continue whenever your vehicle is in gear, this can mean there is a problem occurring in your torque converter. Check to see if the noise desists when you shift the vehicle to park or neutral. A constant whining noise when your car is in gear needs professional attention.
1. Whistling. A whistling noise in your car is not necessarily a cause for alarm, but it is always worth getting it checked out. If you are aware of a constant whistling noise while you are driving, the culprit may be your car`s weather stripping.
Strange Noises

If the sound resembles humming, buzzing, or clunking, you may be experiencing transmission failure. Bad automatic transmissions may emit humming, buzzing, or whining noises while manual transmissions have harsher “clunking” sounds.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

My battery light came on its making a real bad whinning noise
ANSWER : Charging system output should be verified against factory specifications as the alternator may have failed which would account for both the noise and the battery warning light. It is also possible that the noise, and a charging failure, could be from a failed serpentine belt that is not properly driving the alternator. If the alternator tests bad, the battery should be carefully evaluated as well in a load test. Batteries are very important. If the battery only has a marginal pass on the load test you should just simply install a new battery to reduce diagnostic headaches. To have the alternator inspected, and replaced if necessary, please request an alternator inspection/replacement and the responding certified mechanic from YourMechanic will get this resolved for you. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

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My car makes a loud whinning noise from under the hood, it’s hard to turn sometimes, I feel like it grinds a little by the breaks
ANSWER : This suggests your power steering pump may be failing or you have a leak elsewhere in one of the power steering lines. The power steering system operates on very high pressurized hydraulic pressure (in some cases as much as 300 psi). As a result, the pump works very hard to maintain the ability to assist turning your steering wheel and when the pump is overworked due to the rack and pinion not pump fluid properly or potentially due to pinched fluid lines, this may cause it to leak. When this happens, as the pump loses fluid it may cause it to squeal or whine as a result of inadequate fluid. The lack of fluid will cause the hydraulic pressure in the system to drop and you may notice the steering becoming a bit more stiff when turning the wheel. Power steering leaks are fairly common, but should be looked at immediately by a qualified mechanic as power steering fluid can be flammable especially when under extreme pressure. I would recommend having an expert from YourMechanic come to your location to diagnose your power steering system.

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I have a 09 Nissan Altima 2.5 Base Sedan has about 85k miles. After driving the car for about 15-20 on really hot days it starts m
ANSWER : Hi there. In some cases, a problem with the EVAP system; either an EVAP canister or purge solenoid can cause this type of symptom on extremely hot days. Another possibility is that you have an obstruction of fuel somewhere in the fuel system, like the throttle body, fuel injectors or the fuel filter. This could be difficult to diagnose for a professional mechanic as replicating the symptom is going to be difficult; unless it’s a hot day as you indicated. It would be a good idea to have a professional mechanic come to your location to complete a car is making a noise inspection, to isolate the source of that noise – as that sounds as if it’s a loose drive belt or perhaps something internal.

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whinning noise
ANSWER : Hi there. In most cases, when the engine makes a whining noise that increases as your vehicle accelerates, it’s caused by a drive, serpentine or alternator belt or the belt’s pulleys. It’s possible that your serpentine belt was replaced that it was not properly tightened. You might want to have a professional mobile mechanic come to your location and complete a car is making a noise inspection so they can pinpoint the source of the noise and recommend the right repairs.

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Power steering
ANSWER : Hi there:

In most cases, as the power steering pump goes – so does the entire system. If you’re power steering is making squealing noises as you turn, that’s typically an indication that the power steering belt (drive belt or serpentine) or the pulley is loose. However, having difficulty steering or noticing bubbles in the power steering fluid canister is also an indicator of a loose power steering line; which allows air to enter the system. It might be a good idea to have a professional mechanic complete a power steering system inspection before you decide to buy and replace the power steering pump; just to be certain.

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Low idle and stops, sometimes stalls at idle.
ANSWER : As you know, the idle air control valve reads the air intake as it is mixed with fuel prior to being injected into the engine at low speeds and at idle. As this valve is controlled by the vehicle’s computer, it will adjust idle speed based upon other measurements such as engine temperature, intake air temperature and electrical system load or voltage. When you accelerate, the engine RPM increases, and as you let off the gas, the RPM slowly returns to the normal idling speed. When the engine RPM drops below the normal range of 750-800 RPM (for most cars), this often times will cause the engine to stall indicating a dirty or faulty idle air control valve. You can test the functionality of the valve by checking its electrical resistance if you have access to an ohm meter. To do this, disconnect the IAC valve, connect an ohmmeter to pins 2 and 3 of the valve. If you get a resistance value between 10-14 ohms, it indicates IAC valve is working as it should. Next, connect the ohmmeter to pins 1 and 2. If you do not get a resistance value between 10-14 ohms, the IAC valve may need to be replaced. I would recommend having an expert from YourMechanic come to your location to diagnose and repair your idle air control valve.

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After driving my car, the next day will not start. It turns over but will not start 1993 Lexus LS400
ANSWER : Hello – the first task is to get any problem codes, whether the Check Engine is illuminated or not. The next step is to determine whether you have spark at the plugs, or the fuel pump runs on those days when it won’t start. A failing crankshaft position sensor would prevent spark, and a failed fuel pump relay, or the pump itself, could prevent engine start. I recommend a "no start" inspection performed by a mobile, professional mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, who will come to your location, diagnose this problem, give you an accurate assessment of damage and cost estimate for repairs.

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Do I need to replace my water pump or not?
ANSWER : Hello, the belt has an automatic tensioner so there is nothing to adjust or tighten. The belt can make noise if it is out of alignment from a pulley being worn or bearing that the pulley rotates is worn. The water pump could be leaking antifreeze which would get on the belt and cause noise. A whining noise is usually a bearing type failure. The alternator, water pump, belt tensioner and idler pulleys all have bearing. The first step would be to take belt off and rotate each component that I listed, each should have a smooth feel when rotating. If you’d like, a certified Your Mechanic technician can come to your location to diagnose the belt noise.

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