what could cause your brakes to not stop if you have new brake shoes, pads, and have bled the brake line to master cylinder?

I had the brake pad and shoes changed, the rotors were borderline to be rotated, bled the brake line all the way to the master. Still having a problem stopping, you can push on the brake petal as hard as you want to and you will barely stop. Also, the front right is shaking no mattert what speed and replaced the hub assembly, but that wasn't the problem. Someone metioned that it was the inner tie rod end. Your answer back will be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

My car has 210000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hi there. Typically when you experience braking issues as you’ve described shortly after replacing pads and rear shoes, the problem is typically caused by a brake caliper or master cylinder problem. However, it could also be due to an installation failure as well. When you put your pad on, you have to push back the brake calipers. When you pushed back the calipers, did you open the bleeder when you did? If you did not, all the fluid were pushed back toward the brake master cylinder and you have to pump up your brakes. When this is done, you should of only used short strokes on the brake pedal and not cycle it to the floor, up and down, until the pedal gets hard.
This may have caused the master cylinder to get a torn internal piston cup. A certified mechanic will have to flush out the master cylinder and brake system and if that does not fix it then the master cylinder will have to be replaced.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

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The most common cause of failure is a leak in the brake lines. The brake fluid will slowly drain out, until there isn`t enough left to transmit the pressure from the pedal to the tires. The brakes can also fail when the discs or drums wear out, so they can no longer put enough friction on the wheels to stop them.
Sometimes when new brake pads are installed, sediment can inadvertently be pushed back into the hydraulic system. This sediment can damage the master cylinder. A worn or malfunctioning master cylinder. If the master cylinder isn`t performing as designed, it may need to be replaced.
These could be some reasons you have no brake pressure after bleeding your brakes: Air in the brake lines. Brake fluid leak somewhere in the system (check your fluid level to make sure it`s remained at the right amount) Faulty seal in the master cylinder.
A problem with the brake master cylinder will cause the brake pedal to behave abnormally. All the pressure in the braking system is generated from the master cylinder. If it malfunctions, the cylinder will not distribute pressure properly, and the pedal will be affected.
The classic symptom of a failing master cylinder is a brake pedal that “dives” or sinks slowly to the floor while pedal pressure is being applied. Another sign to look out for is any leaks around the master cylinder. If a seal is worn out, it may leak past the seal and onto the pushrod that attaches to the brake pedal.
The ABS modulator is the hydraulic assembly in vehicles that use the anti-lock braking system (ABS) to optimize the brake pressure. A damaged modulator may lead to malfunctioning of the brake valve resulting in spongy brakes.
This can be due to a number of problems: a leak in a brake line, a loss of pressure within the master cylinder itself due to a failed seal, or air being introduced into the braking system. Your first reaction to encountering spongy brakes should be to rapidly pump the brake pedal with your foot.
Unscrew the brake master cylinder reservoir cap. Using a funnel, slowly pour the brake fluid into the fluid reservoir while keeping the brakes pressed down to create pressure and push out any air bubbles forming. Be careful not to exceed the maximum brake fluid level.
Failing Vacuum Pump or Power Steering Pump

If you have a stiff brake pedal and the vehicle has a vacuum pump or hydraulic brake booster, some common issues could be a missing serpentine belt, a failing electric pump, or low power steering fluid.

While running pump the pedal until it is firm. If it holds in the same place it is air in the lines, if it slowly descends to the floor it is the master cylinder.
If a sensor goes bad, then you may experience wheel lock or notice that there is low fluid in the reservoir. The anti-lock brake system fluid level sensor monitors the level of the brake fluid in the reservoir in order to inform the driver if the level falls below the minimum safe level in the event of a malfunction.
If your brakes go out, you want to do three things. First, downshift to a lower gear. Second, if you have regular brakes pump the brake pedal fast and hard to build up brake fluid pressure. If the brakes haven`t started working after three or four pumps go on the step three which is use the parking brake.
This pressure travels from the master cylinder, through the brake line, and acts on the brake caliper and brake rotor. However, if air bubbles are in the brake line, hydraulic pressure is reduced, making your entire braking system less effective and your vehicle more difficult to control.
Yes master cylinders can fail without leakage, the clutch master cylinder has a piston inside and there are separate channels for hi-pressure line and return(low pressure) line and their location in the cylinder differs for manufacturers.
A failing brake booster loses the ability to amplify the force from your foot, which translates to you having to use more effort when pressing the brake pedal. This lowered force on the master cylinder reduces hydraulic pressure in the brake fluid, making it harder to brake.
Increased braking distance is a clear sign of bad or failing brake boosters. Warning lights, such as the ABS, or anti-lock braking system, will activate if you have an electronic brake booster system failure. Fluid leakage is typical for hydraulic booster failure.
With the car turned off, pump the brake pedal four or five times until you get a hard brake pedal. Continue to hold the brake pedal down with moderate pressure and start the vehicle. The brake pedal should drop. If this brake pedal remains hard, there is a problem with the brake booster, such as a ripped diaphragm.
Pedal and hold

Hold. Bleed. Repeat. Loud callouts of “pump it up” or “pressure” and “hold it down” can make the garage or driveway sound like a Sunday morning at the Waffle House, but the two-person procedure is a tried and true way to get the brakes bled quickly.

Usually, your brake pedal will sink if the ABS or master cylinder cannot maintain the proper hydraulic pressure. This inability to maintain hydraulic pressure will not only make your brake pedal sink to the floor, but it will also make it much more difficult to stop your automobile.
Pressure Differential Switch

The valve/switch kicks in and blocks off pressure to that line, reserving pressure to either the front or rear brakes, allowing you to maintain one or the other so that you can safely come to a stop.

The “stiff” gas pedal issue is most likely caused by a dirty throttle body in the air intake system. Cleaning the throttle body should relieve this symptom. The lack of “Drive” selection, unless first selecting “Reverse”, could be a loose or misadjusted shift cable or shift linkage issue.
A failed master cylinder can cause a low or spongy brake pedal but generally does not make any noises. If however you hear a loud hissing sound when the brakes are applied, the power/vacuum brake booster may have a vacuum leak.
If the brake pedal is hard & there`s a hissing sound coming from the footwell wherever the master cylinder then there`s an air leak in the brake booster diaphragm,if the brake pedal goes right to the floor or the brake pedal is spongy even after bleeding the brakes & there`s no external leaks then it`s likely that the …

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

what could cause your brakes to not stop if you have new brake shoes, pads, and have bled the brake line to master cylinder?
ANSWER : Hi there. Typically when you experience braking issues as you’ve described shortly after replacing pads and rear shoes, the problem is typically caused by a brake caliper or master cylinder problem. However, it could also be due to an installation failure as well. When you put your pad on, you have to push back the brake calipers. When you pushed back the calipers, did you open the bleeder when you did? If you did not, all the fluid were pushed back toward the brake master cylinder and you have to pump up your brakes. When this is done, you should of only used short strokes on the brake pedal and not cycle it to the floor, up and down, until the pedal gets hard.
This may have caused the master cylinder to get a torn internal piston cup. A certified mechanic will have to flush out the master cylinder and brake system and if that does not fix it then the master cylinder will have to be replaced.

Changed brake master cylinder, bled 10 times, and the pedal is soft The rear brakes are not locked but close. Truck now running rough.
ANSWER : You will have to bleed the brakes from the farthest location all the way to the master cylinder. There is still air in the lines causing the issue. Check the vibrations on the vehicle to see if the engine mounts are damaged or if the brakes are not releasing causing the engine to run harder than normal to overcome the braking force. If you need further assistance with your vehicle’s brake system, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

Low brake pedal and anti-lock brakes are not kicking in.
ANSWER : The brake pedal is working to stop the vehicle, but there may be air in the controller unit causing the ABS brakes to not function. I recommend bleeding the brake system from the farthest location from the master cylinder to the master cylinder including the ABS unit. If the brakes are still spongy after a full bleed, then the controller will need to be replaced. If you need further assistance with your brake pedal being spongy, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

I’ve replaced 4 new calipers 4 new rotors pads all new & Master brake cylinder in but it still drags
ANSWER : The flexible hoses that go from the body to the calipers are frequently the cause of this problem. And your mileage is just about right. They have several layers and the layers separate internally leaving no apparent exterior damage. The broken lining acts as a one-way valve, allowing the brake pressure through, but not permitting it to bleed back when the brakes are released. The good news is that they are relatively inexpensive and not very hard to change. Proper bleeding procedure is important though. If you would like to have this or other jobs done for you, Contact Your Mechanic. They will send a technician to your home or office to check out your dragging brakes and replace the hydraulic hoses if necessary.

Could the brake servo booster that the master cylinder attaches to cause the brake pedal’s excessive travel?
ANSWER : Hi there. Typically, when a brake booster fails, the result is a hard to push brake pedal. The pressure release you hear is engine vacuum and may be normal considering, the brake pedal travels to the floor. With no apparent leak(s) in the hydraulic braking system, the master cylinder internally bypassing is the most common failure. Having replaced the master cylinder, this leads me to believe, there may be air trapped and a flush may resolve this concern. Assuming, the vehicle is equipped with ABS (anti-lock brake system). The ABS hydraulic modulator assembly may be internally bypassing. I recommend having your vehicle’s brake pedal issue diagnosed and repaired by a certified technician, such as one from YourMechanic.

abs light on brake line broke have been replace I bleed brake line but brake pad still go to the floor now wheels lock up
ANSWER : Hello. If the brake pedal is going to the floor then that means that it is not building pressure. If the brake system has been fully bled and there is no air in it then most of the time it is a bad master cylinder or it can be caused by a bad ABS module. If the brake fluid was low and if air got into the system then the only way to properly bleed it is with a scan tool that would allow you to open and close the valves in the ABS unit. Air gets trapped in these easily if the brake fluid gets low. This can also explain why the brakes are locking up. I would usually use my scan tool to bleed the system out first before going any further. I would also scan the brake control module to see what it is reading as a fault. If there is no air in the system and if there is no prominent code then I would replace the master cylinder first. If you want to check out why your brakes are locking up, consider YourMechanic, as a certified mechanic can come to your home or office to diagnose and repair this.

New front pads & rotors (2mths) and hear a grinding noise when coming to a slow gradual stop. What could be causing this?
ANSWER : Hello, thank you for writing in. The last technicians that worked on your vehicle are not wrong. There are certain types of brake pads that will make a squealing noise when the brakes are applied. These are typically made from a metal composite material. You can always research the brand they put on and find out more about the brake pads. This would give you a good idea of what you should reasonably expect. Are the brakes exhibiting any other types of symptoms? If there is any sponginess in the pedal, shaking or vibrating, hard stops, or other symptoms then there may be more cause for concern. In situations like these, if you are expecting to drive the vehicle a longer distance in the near future, it is recommended that you get a second opinion. Our technicians can dispatch to your home or office.

I blew a brake line last night, replaced line.bled brakes from master cylinder, brakes very squishy
ANSWER : Both improper bleeding and a failed master cylinder could be the fault. Running the master cylinder dry can lead it to fail quickly. The primary seal on the master cylinder piston will tear easily. Make another attempt to bleed the brake system. Start by bleeding the master cylinder. Have a friend pump the brakes. NOTE: Have the person pumping the pedal for you place their left foot under the brake pedal. You should never pump the pedal to the floor or you WILL damage the master cylinder piston seals if they’re not already damaged. Bleed each line at the master cylinder then go to the wheels. Make sure the brake fluid reservoir does not run low during the entire process. Start at the wheel furthest from the master cylinder – the right rear wheel. Crack the bleeder screw loose and allow it to gravity-bleed – let the fluid just run out on it’s own for a moment. Then tighten the bleeder screw and have your helper pump the pedal 3-4 times between each bleed. Crack the bleeder loose again and repeat the process 3-4 times at each wheel as you move closer to the master cylinder. Right rear, then left rear, then right front, then left front. If bleeding the system like this does not restore the brake pedal, then in all likelihood, a master cylinder replacement will do the trick.