Two hoses that lead nowhere

I have found two hoses that lead to nothing. They may have snapped off after I replaced the started but im not sure. One starts at the top of the throttle body and the other starts off of something that is below the master cylinder. I am unable to find the name of these hoses anywhere.

My car has 173000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
I’ve spent many an hour scratching my head over just this kind of problem. One of the hazards of working on older cars is having hoses and fittings break off while you’re trying to get to something else. I know it’s not much help now, but these days everybody has a camera in their pocket, so it can be helpful to take a few photos of the engine compartment before you start working. As for the hoses you’re contending with, I’m sure you would have mentioned if there were coolant coming out of them. And if the car runs and idles well, they are probably not carrying vacuum, so I’ll guess that they are part of the evaporative emissions system. Look for a part that looks like a small coffee can somewhere under the hood, probably around the master cylinder or tucked away in a dark corner. You may find the other end of the hoses there. If you can’t find where these hoses go, don’t leave them hanging. contact your mechanic and have a technician come to your home and sort out these hoses for you.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced mechanics :

The EVAP emissions control canister is located on the driver side, near the rear tires.
The EVAP system is designed to stop fuel system fumes from leaking directly into the atmosphere. Vent lines from the fuel tank pass vapors to the vapor canister, where they are trapped and stored until the engine is started.
If you see a P0442 evaporative emission system leak detected code, you may be able to resolve the problem without much effort. The easiest solution may be to remove and reaffix the gas cap. Once you do, clear the code on the OBD-II diagnostic scanner and drive for a few days.
There are several types of EVAP systems, but the standard system is comprised of your fuel tank, gas cap, liquid-vapor, fuel tank pressure sensor, separator, evap canister, and series of tubes and valves. These parts work together to purge the harmful hydrocarbons.
Finally, an EVAP leak can cause the vehicle to fail an emissions test. This is because the fuel vapors that escape are not being burned off in the combustion chamber, resulting in higher emissions. This can lead to costly repairs and fines if the vehicle does not pass the emissions test.
When you have a leak in your EVAP system it will cause a check engine light to come on, but will not immediately affect your drivability. While you drive around, however, you are letting harmful fuel vapors escape into the atmosphere and adding to the greenhouse effect that is linked to global warming.
What Does Toyota Code P0456 Mean? Toyota P0456 definition: Evaporative emission control system leak (small). Repair Urgency: Get this fixed within the next month to prevent drivability problems and excessive fuel consumption.
Yes, you can still drive with a P0455 code since it won`t affect the way the vehicle performs. However, if the fuel odors are strong and you suspect there`s a leak, take your car to a technician immediately.
The exhaust leak will need to be located and repaired before further testing…. Emissions Systems code P0456. This fault code indicates a very small leak in the evaporative emission system.
While the most common cause for fault code P0446 is a loose or damaged gas cap, there could be other components causing a fault in your vehicle`s vent control valve or more.
Evaporative emissions control systems – EVAP for short – are mandated in all cars and trucks. The EVAP system is there to capture these vapors and direct them into the engine to be burned – kind of an on-board recycling program.
The most common causes for EVAP leaks include bad seals and O-rings, a failing purge valve, a damaged hose or vent, or a defective leak detection pump. As you might have guessed, there`s no real way to prevent one of those components from failing unless you`d like to regularly replace components of your fuel system.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Lost hose below two heater hoses and unable to find proper name for hose to replace it. Can you assist?
ANSWER : Hi there. The hose that you are describing sounds like the heater core by-pass hose. If the hose is short and straight, then it would be the heater by-pass hose. The heater by-pass hose it to by-pass the heating system until the engine is hot. If you need further assistance with your coolant hoses, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

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How do I know I have two resonators? Can I have two mufflers in each side with one resonator? Which side is most important? Thank You.
ANSWER : You may have a single small resonator in the middle of the car that splits to the two mufflers. One on each side with single or dual tip outlets. The two mufflers are equal to each other to exit the exhaust flow. For more concrete advice, I’d recommend having an expert technician check out your specific muffler situation in person. A technician from YourMechanic can come to your home or office inspect your exhaust system and assist with any repairs that are needed.

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installing a upper radiator hose, about an inch down the piece you slide the hose over has a raised lip, do i slide hose over lip
ANSWER : Hello, thank you for writing in. Correct, you want to place the hose clamp between the two raised lips. If the hose will willfully go over the second lip, that is fine. The goal is to have the hose beyond the first lip, and have that lip there to give the clamp something to hold the hose on with. The second lip is to give an area for the hose to recede down into so the hose clamp can get a good grip. The longer the hose stays in place, the more the hose will form to the area giving you a good seal.

Read Full Q/A … : Two hoses that lead nowhere

Two hoses that lead nowhere
ANSWER : I’ve spent many an hour scratching my head over just this kind of problem. One of the hazards of working on older cars is having hoses and fittings break off while you’re trying to get to something else. I know it’s not much help now, but these days everybody has a camera in their pocket, so it can be helpful to take a few photos of the engine compartment before you start working. As for the hoses you’re contending with, I’m sure you would have mentioned if there were coolant coming out of them. And if the car runs and idles well, they are probably not carrying vacuum, so I’ll guess that they are part of the evaporative emissions system. Look for a part that looks like a small coffee can somewhere under the hood, probably around the master cylinder or tucked away in a dark corner. You may find the other end of the hoses there. If you can’t find where these hoses go, don’t leave them hanging. contact your mechanic and have a technician come to your home and sort out these hoses for you.

Read Full Q/A … : Two hoses that lead nowhere

There’s a hose under the top radiator hose that seems to be leaking antifreeze. What hose is that and is it an easy fix?
ANSWER : Hi there. Usually the hose that’s directly under the top radiator hose is a return surge tank hose; typically coming from the radiator overflow coolant reservoir. Since winter is coming around soon, the best way to diagnose a coolant leak and to ensure it’s not your heater core of heater hose is to contact a professional mechanic and have them complete a coolant leak inspection. This service is the best way to eliminate the guess work and ensure you’re Chrysler 300 is repaired sooner rather than later.

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What’s the name of this hose nobody seems to know or mention even in Google?
ANSWER : The hose you are referring to would be the bypass hose. It is very possible that plymouth may have a different name for the hose but the typical name for this hose is the bypass hose.

This hose allows coolant to bypass the thermostat to keep the circulation of coolant going through the engine before it has reached operating temperature.

Depending on how the hose connects to the vehicle, you may be able to just get a piece of bulk hose that is the same size and length as the old hose and just use that.

If you need assistance with replacing it, have one of our mobile technicians come to you to diagnose any issues firsthand and replace your bypass hose as necessary.

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PCV hose broke, car stalled, replaced hose, car still stalling. Smell of gas (rich exhaust smell).
ANSWER : Hello. You do likely have a major boost leak or vacuum leak present. Volkswagen’s are very sensitive to any type of vacuum leak. On Volkswagen’s, even if the oil dipstick is is removed it will produce a vacuum leak cause the engine to idle erratically. I suggest that a smoke test is performed on your vehicle by a shop or technician which well help find the leak(s). A different way to test it is to spray starting fluid around your areas where a vacuum leak might be. The RPM’s increasing when spraying starter fluid would indicate that there is a vacuum leak present nearby the area being sprayed.

Please keep in mind that the technicians here at YourMechanic can perform such diagnostics.

You are able to find a technician and schedule an appointment here

https://www.yourmechanic.com

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I have to replace an upper radiator hose, what steps must I take to access the hose and remove it.
ANSWER : Access to the hose is clear. On a vehicle of this age, if you are replacing one radiator hose, really all should be replaced, including the heater hoses, due to the inevitable deterioration of rubber products. YourMechanic does perform radiator hose replacements on a mobile basis and so feel free to set up a mobile visit to have the hose(s) replaced. If you replace the hoses(s) yourself, be sure to use any available purge points to remove trapped air as you refill the cooling system. Trapped air can cause engine overheating until it dislodges.

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