Transmission rebuilt

Rebuilt my transmission, Worked for a couple of days. Took it back a few weeks later stuck in second , now they want $800 to replace speed they said they fixed it again sensor in transmission… What can I do? Already paid 1,300 to rebuild! Took it back 3 times Please HELP! Thank you
My car has an automatic transmission.
Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hello, thanks for writing in. Presumably there is a warranty on the work they have performed (if not, your state Consumer Protection laws specify what your rights are with regard to auto repairs of this sort and/or contact your state Attorney General’s office).

If the component that they claim has failed is integral to the transmission and they rebuilt the entire transmission, then they are responsible for repairing the fault at their cost under warranty. A rebuilt transmission has to work for a reasonable period of time without causing you new or continued headaches. If it doesn’t, then the job probably wasn’t done right.

I recommend to try to reason with them but if that doesn’t work you will have to seek recovery through the usual mechanisms (Attorney General’s office, etc.) Try working it out with the shop but before you discuss it with the shop further, visit the AG’s office so that you can fully understand what your rights are and what options you. That way, you can more confidently and intelligently discuss the matter with the shop.

If we can help further, don’t hesitate to re-contact us.

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A rebuilt transmission has been reconditioned. Someone has cleaned it, inspected it, identified the components that are worn or broken and replaced only those parts.
Rebuilt transmissions are typically patched with old components; however, they work as you would expect, but the parts are not new ones. In contrast, remanufactured components are re-created, or somewhat refurbished with new parts, which makes them seemingly new systems.
A transmission rebuild is a great option in most cases. This means you are only replacing the parts that have failed. Just like a replace, you are fixing certain parts, but not doing it in a factory setting. You will want a very reputable repair shop to have this done.
A rebuilt transmission will extend the life of your vehicle, because when the worn parts are replaced, the transmission becomes “good as new”. Another benefit is that when it comes time to trade in your car, you`ll get a higher price for it if the transmission is still in good shape.
A remanufactured transmission is often the best possible deal with all factors considered. They cost a little less than new transmissions but are just as reliable. They also typically have parts guarantees provided by companies with reputations to protect.
If the unit is more than 75 percent worn out, we rebuild. If the equipment is less than 75 percent worn out, we refurbish.
You can expect a rebuilt transmission to last about 30,000 to 50,000 miles, but if the work is done well, and you perform regular maintenance, a rebuilt transmission can last just as long as a new one, giving you anywhere from 120,000 to 150,000 additional miles.
With proper maintenance, transmissions can last up to 300,000 miles or more. This includes changing the fluid in your transmission system and regular checkups. However, when you don`t keep up with routine maintenance, your transmission might have problems at the 100,000-mile mark or even sooner.
Bottom Line: Used transmissions, or transmissions built from recycled or salvaged parts, are typically as reliable as their new counterparts and a good deal less expensive.
With good workmanship, rebuilt engines can last just as long and work as well as the former engine that was originally installed in your classic car. Usually, you can expect a rebuilt engine to keep going for at least a few years.
Products that are labeled “refurbished” are fully functional but they can`t technically be sold as “new” anymore, for reasons that vary by manufacturer. Because of this, they`re typically cheaper and you could save hundreds of dollars depending on your purchase.
In the majority of cases when buying a second-hand product, refurbished is the way to go. The device will have been returned to a close-to-original condition and will be cheaper than a new model too. Certified Refurbished products go a step further, adding a manufacturer`s warranty into the mix.
In most cases, a full custom transmission rebuild is the best recommendation. Basically, the transmission is completely dismantled and every single component is inspected. All good parts are cleaned and reinstalled while any damaged parts are replaced with new or refurbished ones.
Deciding on whether your transmission should be rebuilt or replaced is usually a question of cost and time to complete the repair. Having a transmission expert rebuild your transmission may take a little longer and cost a bit more upfront, but it can result in a longer-lasting and better-performing transmission.
Some transmissions can last just over 10,000 miles, while others will last over 200,000 miles. Generally though, regular vehicle maintenance is the number one factor effecting a transmission`s lifespan, and good upkeep can help it last even longer.
Standard transmissions usually don`t need to be replaced during their entire lifetime, whereas some automatic transmissions need replacing around the 200-250,000 km mark. Overall, it is important to maintain regular servicing and maintenance for your transmission.
Manual transmissions require less servicing to remain functional and don`t need the same type of oil as an automatic transmission. Cars with a stick-shift usually last longer than an automatic of the same make and model.
An engine rebuild is known as a process where the finished product is considered brand new from the inside out. All the parts of the engine that display signs of wear are replaced with brand new replacements. The parts that could be replaced include the valves, pistons, bearings, and seals.
When something has to be repaired, it`s easy to assume it won`t be as good as it once was, but that`s actually not the case when it comes to a rebuilt engine. In fact, rebuilt engines are usually just as good, if not better, than new. Some of the benefits of rebuilt engines include: The engine manufacturer warranty.
All things considered, rebuilding an engine is no small task, however, with the right tools, knowledge, and time, this is a task that is very possible to do on one`s own.
The main drawback to a rebuilt engine is that it contains a mix of both old and new parts. Greg`s Engine & Machine, a repair shop in Copley, Ohio, says the older components may shorten the engine`s life expectancy even if the newer parts are more efficient and reliable.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Rebuilt transmission performs worse than previous one – 1990 Toyota Supra Manual
ANSWER : Depending on how "recently" the transmission was rebuilt, you might first go back to the transmission repair shop and point out the significant change in performance. Perhaps something bumped when the transmission was removed/replaced? Exhaust pipe dented/obstructed? Otherwise, get a professional mechanic to check this out – YourMechanic can help.

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There is automatic transmission fluid in a manual transmission. Is it okay to leave or do I need manual transmission fluid?
ANSWER : This would depend on what the manufacturer recommends. Many manual transmissions do take automatic transmission fluid. If your transmission has ATF in it, it is very likely that it is supposed to have that in there. If not, it is likely that the transmission would not function properly with the wrong fluid. Many manual transmissions will also take engine oil as a lubricant. The best way to know for sure is to check your owner’s manual or call your local General Motors dealership to inquire.

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Can too much transmission fluid cause speedometer malfunctions?
ANSWER : Hi there. In most cases when you overfill the transmission fluid it can cause excessive foaming of the fluid or possible internal component failure due to excessive pressure inside the hydraulic lines. Sensors like the speed sensors however are rarely impacted by this situation. However, in regards to the possibility of probability of this; I would say perhaps a 10% chance.

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2013 Ford Focus Transmission Issue. Is it worth keeping the car?
ANSWER : Hi There,
This is a known issue in this generation Ford Focus and some Fiestas with the "Power Shift" transmission and there have been numerous recalls and lawsuits. Although, it is would be difficult to determine how much longer your transmission will last given the fact that you have many new parts, I would not recommend junking the car as it may still provide some valuable life left for you. I would recommend taking it to the dealer to see if these parts may be covered under the recall.

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Transmission overheating
ANSWER : Hi there. To be completely honest, I am not shocked to hear you are having issues after a replacement at "that location". Sometimes in an effort to bust out as much volume as possible, a service facility like this will tend to make simple mistakes that will cause less than perfect performance. Assuming that a transmission cooler is utilized and properly installed, in general, there are two things that will cause transmissions to run hot; low transmission fluid or debris in the fluid that causes restriction of fluid flowing in the hydraulic lines. It is possible that the transmission fluid is simply low. However, as much as I agree that 210 is ’hot’; under normal driving in a hot weather area like Arizona is right on the edge of "normal operating temperature". I would do two things. First, check your transmission fluid level and add fluid if it is low. While you are inspecting the fluid level, check the integrity of the fluid. If you feel grit on the dip stick, it’s likely that the new transmission has metal debris or other debris that is causing the excessive heat. A transmission flush and filter change should resolve these problems.

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Transmission fluid comes up out of the transmission vent tube attached to the transmission dipstick tube
ANSWER : Hi there. Fluid seepage out of the vent tube can sometimes be normal, but can also be caused by overfilling. Has a service been performed recently? Perform a fluid level and condition inspection by having the engine at idle, on a level surface, warmed up engine, and remove the dipstick and cleaning it with a shop towel. Reinsert the dipstick and fully remove to a horizontal position for inspection. Make sure the fluid is not milky, very dark, or has contamination. The level should be in the safe zone marked on the stick.

Have an inspection by a qualified technician determine if any problems truly do exist and provide you with some assurance. YourMechanic has several technicians available that can assist you with a transmission leak inspection and can perform a transmission fluid service if needed.

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Kia Optima 2004 v6 LX new engine old transmission no problems before with transmission now my transmission is shifting a high rpm
ANSWER : Hi There,
This may be an issue related to the communication of the PCM and the TCM (Transmission control module). As you may know, the TCM relies on the PCM to transmit information related to RPM’s, which the TCM then uses to determine when to direct the transmission to shift. The transmission control module has various sensors such as vehicle speed sensors, wheel speed sensors, throttle position sensors, turbine speed sensor, and transmission fluid temperature sensors that all direct information to it in order for it to perform it’s function. Other functions controlled by the TCM are components such as a kick down switch, traction control system, and cruise control module. Any of these may also affect the way the transmission control module performs and controls the transmission and the shifting of your vehicle. I would suggest having a professional from Your Mechanic come to your location to properly diagnose your transmission problem.

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Clicking sound while driving after having transmission rebuilt twice on a 2004 Chevy Trail Blazer
ANSWER : Unfortunately for you, you’ve had your transmission rebuilt twice at the same shop. So, obviously, they didn’t do a good job the first time and I’d be kind of leery about it the second time.

If I were you, I would get another mechanic to inspect the clicking sound for you. All mechanics have good equipment. Personally, I use one of these sound devices. I’ve got one that has little wireless transmitters clipping different parts of the car and in this case, I clip them to the transmission. I wear the set of headphones and the receiver picks up the noise when I am driving down the road, I can turn it up and put two or three of these transmitters around. I can hear where the noise is coming from. Any good mechanic has equipment like that and they can say if the transmission is making the noise.

If that’s the case, I would probably go back to whoever rebuilt it and I would ask for my money back. I would go somewhere else to fix it correctly. You can get so many chances to do it again, but they don’t fix it right the second time, that’s too bad. They can give you your money back and go someplace else.

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