Transmission fluid leak in 2008 Infiniti QX56

Transmission fluid is spraying out of a hose and into the undercarriage.
Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hello. The only hoses that carry transmission fluid on your vehicle are the transmission cooler lines. If there is fluid spraying from them, then there must be a hole in the line. The correct way to repair this is to either replace the entire metal and rubber line assembly or just replace the rubber part with new compression fittings. I would start by identifying the source of the leak first. It may even be coming from where the line enters the radiator which may indicate that the radiator needs to be replaced. I would enlist the help of a certified mechanic, like one from YourMechanic, to replace the hose and inspect for other possible problems.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced mechanics :

A transmission leak is a common occurrence that happens through excessive wear over time. The plugs could be loose or the pan could be punctured. Either way, the moment you notice transmission fluid, contact your local mechanic and have them inspect and repair your transmission fluid leak.
Faulty Transmission Pan or Gasket

The fuel pan gasket is the number one culprit if your vehicle`s transmission fluid leaks when your car is parked. Cars with automatic transmissions have a pan gasket designed to catch most fluids leaking from the engine.

A transmission leak will not get better on its own. If it goes unchecked, vehicle operation will eventually be affected, and you may find yourself with an expensive repair. So, while it may be safe to drive with a leaking transmission, it`s not advisable, and you shouldn`t put off fixing the problem.
A puddle on the ground: The most obvious sign of a transmission leak is discovering a pool of transmission fluid under your vehicle. Most leaks start small, so check your regular parking spot often. A few drops aren`t necessarily a major problem, but it will be the sign that you have the start of a leak.
The most obvious sign of a transmission fluid leak is the sudden appearance of a fluid puddle beneath a vehicle when parked for extended periods of time. The fluid within this puddle will appear to be red or light brown in color, and will typically appear somewhat thinner in viscosity than engine oil.
Thankfully, this particular problem does not require a major repair. Your technician can repair the transmission leak by replacing the seals to fix the problem.
The cost to fix a transmission fluid leak in a vehicle can be as little as $150 to replace a seal and around $1,000 to for a new torque converter.
While it is not especially dangerous to continue driving with a leaking transmission fluid, it can cause catastrophic damage to your engine. As soon as you notice your car is leaking transmission fluid, you should seek to contact a certified mechanic to have your transmission fluid serviced.
A puddle on the ground: The most obvious sign of a transmission leak is discovering a pool of transmission fluid under your vehicle. Most leaks start small, so check your regular parking spot often. A few drops aren`t necessarily a major problem, but it will be the sign that you have the start of a leak.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

There is automatic transmission fluid in a manual transmission. Is it okay to leave or do I need manual transmission fluid?
ANSWER : This would depend on what the manufacturer recommends. Many manual transmissions do take automatic transmission fluid. If your transmission has ATF in it, it is very likely that it is supposed to have that in there. If not, it is likely that the transmission would not function properly with the wrong fluid. Many manual transmissions will also take engine oil as a lubricant. The best way to know for sure is to check your owner’s manual or call your local General Motors dealership to inquire.

My car is leaking transmission fluid – I can’t diagnose the leak
ANSWER : Based on the NHTSA database covering consumer complaints, as well as government mandated recalls and factory service bulletins, for your specific year, make and model, I do not see evidence of widespread complaints about transmission fluid leaks. Such leaks are, in fact, common in transmissions made by any car company, particularly if the transmission is older than say 10 years. There is a manual shaft seal, oil pan gasket, output shaft seals, case seals, torque converter seal (inaccessible) and so forth all of which are potential leak points on your transmission.

If you want to identify and resolve these leaks, certainly a certified Mechanic from YourMechanic could come out and perform a transmission leak inspection and let you know where the leak points are and what it will cost to resolve them.

Transmission fluid leaked while pulling a car out of mud
ANSWER : From the description you’re giving me, I’m not sure. I know many Fords, including my F150, have a circular seal type bell housing inspection cover near the transmission. Fluid pooled in this area generally indicates an engine oil leak from the rear main seal or a transmission leak from the front pump seal. The only way to know for sure is to have your truck’s transmission leak inspected firsthand by a professional. The team at YourMechanic is an excellent option since we make house calls.

New cars don’t have transmission fluid dipsticks Transmission fluid changing
ANSWER : That’s a very good question. The reason they have gone with no dipsticks is because they don’t want people messing with transmissions other there at the dealership. Some cars went through that a couple of decades ago. They make it a very involved, convoluted process all through, in order to change the fluid on these modern cars. They have special adapters you have to put. Some of them have to have scan computers in order to read the data and what’s in there, and then be able to change it. A lot of these companies claim that this new fluid is the "lifetime" fluid.

Most new use synthetic fluid can last a long time but any fluid is going to get dirty and wear out over time. I would change it at least every 80,000 – 100,000 miles but if you’ve got one that is really hard to change, you are better off hiring a mechanic to do it.

On some of the cars, it would be too hard for the do-it-yourself because of all that equipment you need. The professional mechanics already have that. Just call any good mechanic, like one from YourMechanic, and they will be able to perform a transmission fluid service for you.

1998 mercedes benz c280 transmission fluid leak from top
ANSWER : Hi there. Unfortunately, we are not able to receive pictures or video to pinpoint damage or identify parts for vehicles through this platform. The best way to identify this item is to search online for a detailed schematic of your C280 Mercedes-Benz or contact a local MB specialist mechanic or the dealership service department to determine the parts name and function. You might also want to have a MB specialist mechanic install and inspect your vehicle for further transmission fluid leaks to ensure the repairs are correctly completed.

Can I use alternative Transmission fluid to the quotes recommended fluid if i’m bringing my own parts?
ANSWER : I would recommend buying the correct fluid. The reason is because I want to make sure your car is taken care of and is running as long as possible. You wouldn’t want to put something foreign in your car that it may not accept unless you’re willing to accept risks. Different fluids have different chemicals in it. It may cost more right now, but you won’t have to spend money buying a new transmission or having one rebuilt.

Will adding Transmission Fluid with Stop Leak to a transmission with over 230,000 miles hurt it?
ANSWER : Both of these additives are designed to block small leaks or seepage from a gasket or rubber seal an not to fix major leaks or leaks where there will be excessive pressures, such as coolant leaks into the combustion chamber of the cooling system or leaks in high pressure areas of the transmission.

I would not recommend the use of these products unless a manufacturer specified to use them, like how GM did on their earlier models of the modular motors that had coolant leaking through the pores of the engine block from defective castings.

Before adding any of these additives I would recommend having a mechanic check the transmission fluid leak to see what the proper repair should be. These additives can sometimes clog systems and make matters worse in the long run.

Is there any reason that a transmission fluid leak issue has to do with needing a a/c compressor replacement? 2008 Jeep Liberty
ANSWER : Hi there – these 2 faults are NOT connected. A transmission fluid leak will not cause AC compressor failure. You are not getting good advice from whoever told you this – not to be trusted. A transmission fluid leak can cause slipping the transmission, and should be repaired ASAP. I recommend a transmission leak inspection performed by a mobile, professional mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, who will come to your location, diagnose this problem, give you an accurate assessment of damage and cost estimate for repairs. Failure of the AC compressor will cause a loss of passenger cooling.