Torn cv joint boot

I have a torn cv joint boot and read that its better to replace the whole cv joint. What type of cv joint half shaft brand would you guys recommend? I am looking for one that would be durable and will last. Would you guys also recommend changing both sides, even if the other side isn't torn?

My car has 80000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
There is no single recommended brand to use since you can get manufactured new or rebuild by many brands out there. You might not have much choice with what is available in your area unless you went with a new from the dealer. You don’t have to replace both sides at the same time unless the other one is also proven to be bad. If you need some help with getting this fixed, consider YourMechanic, as one of our certified technicians can replace your CV boot using quality parts.

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If a CV boot tears, grease can leak out and moisture and dirt can get in. If left unattended, it`s only a matter of time before the joint fails from lack of lubrication or corrosion. When that happens, the whole axle may need to be replaced.
Split boot kits are a quick fix, but new boots go the distance. New or remanufactured replacement CV axle half shafts are the most efficient repair, but aren`t readily available for 30-year-old low-production turbo specialty sports cars like the 1987 Mitsubishi Starion. Before you do anything, get the axle out.
There is no real set time how long the bad joint will last, and it may last a year or a month. A YourMechanic technician can travel to your location and help and replace the axle CV joint boot as soon as possible.
If the boot that seals the CV joint is damaged, the grease will leak out and contamination will set in, eventually causing the joint to wear out and fail. A severely worn out CV joint can even disintegrate while you`re driving and make the car undrivable. You may lose control of the vehicle entirely.
You may be able to drive on a bad CV axle for several months, but it depends on the extent of the damage. We`re obliged to let you know that the safest thing to do is get the axle replaced immediately. The longer you wait, the worse the damage will be.
If no noise is present and only the CV boot is broken, you can replace just the CV boot. Tip: Before you install a new axle, check the CV joints (even when the boot is broken) and see if they are worth saving. If you need to replace the CV axle completely, the new CV axle will come with the boots already installed.
CV joints are packed with grease for lubrication. To keep the grease in the joint and moisture, dirt and roadway grime out, the joint is covered with a rubber boot called a CV boot. CV boots are made of a durable rubber that can withstand extreme weather and travel conditions.
It`s not always a worn boot that causes CV joints to fail. When the bolts attaching the inner joint to the transaxle or the outer joint to the wheels fail, the condition of the CV boot is irrelevant. Most gearheads know what happens to a CV (constant velocity) joint when the boot is torn or cracked.
A CV boot is there to keep corrosive substances out and away from the car and chassis parts associated with steering and turning and holding the wheels in place. Drive as long as you want, just realize repair cost will probably increase the longer you wait as unprotected parts will be exposed.
This may seem like an obscure part, one that you don`t have to worry about. But CV boots serve a simple but important purpose and allow the CV axles and joints to stay clean and enjoy a long service life. When a CV boot leaks, it can cause the attached joint to become damaged posing a serious safety hazard.
Common signs include grease leaking onto the inside of the wheels, vibrations around the CV axle, and clicking noises during turns.
Driving on a Bad CV Joint is Extremely Dangerous!

Failure to replace a failing CV Joint is incredibly dangerous, as the part can potentially fail at high speeds putting you, your passengers, and other drivers on the road at serious risk.

Common signs include grease leaking onto the inside of the wheels, vibrations around the CV axle, and clicking noises during turns.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Torn cv joint boot
ANSWER : There is no single recommended brand to use since you can get manufactured new or rebuild by many brands out there. You might not have much choice with what is available in your area unless you went with a new from the dealer. You don’t have to replace both sides at the same time unless the other one is also proven to be bad. If you need some help with getting this fixed, consider YourMechanic, as one of our certified technicians can replace your CV boot using quality parts.

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I’ve replaced everything from tie rods, upper and lower ball joints, the whole cv axle including cv joints and boots, and I’m stil
ANSWER : Hello, thank you for writing in. The noise you are hearing may be a result of a wheel bearing or a shock issue. There are several tests that can be done while the vehicle is parked, and some while it is lifted off of the ground. The goal is to manipulate the wheels and suspension to replicate the noise. Try a simple bounce test for example to test out the shock on each tire. This is done by simply pressing down on the corner of the vehicle forcing it to bounce up and down. If you hear the noise, focus on your shocks. If not, you can move on to the wheel assembly. For more help with diagnostics or repairs, contact our service department to schedule an appointment.

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Will a bad wheel bearing damage the CV joints, or will bad CV joints damage the wheel bearing? Honda Accord lax 2006
ANSWER : Any bad part in the drive train can put additional stress on other parts. I could probably draw a line from a bad wheel bearing to a bad CV joint. Not so much the other way. However, it might seem that way because the parts have a similar life span. Once one part fails, the others may come soon after. If your car really only has 45000 miles it seems a little soon for either one to be failing unless you are living and driving in bad northern winters. If your car is making sounds in either the CV or the wheel bearings, you can have it checked out at your convenience by contacting Your Mechanic. They can send a technician to your home or office to check out your Honda and tell you what it may need.

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CV boot or full replacement of CV axle ?
ANSWER : This is a common sign of a failing CV joint. A CV (Constant Velocity) joint is a shaft that connects the transmission to the wheels, essentially transferring the power from the drive train directly to the wheels. The CV joint is packed with a special grease and sealed tight with the rubber or plastic boot, that is held in place with two clamps. The most common problem with the CV joints is when the protective boot cracks or gets damaged. Once this happens, the grease comes out and moisture and dirt get in, causing the CV joint to wear faster and eventually fail due to lack of lubrication and corrosion. When the CV joint becomes damaged or worn, you may hear a clicking or popping sound coming from this area. I would recommend having an expert from YourMechanic come to your location to diagnose and inspect your CV joints.

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Driving on torn CV boot?
ANSWER : If you have been driving on torn CV boots and now have noise when turning and have driven like that for a while then you should have the axles replaced as soon as possible. You do not have to go to the dealer to have it done. You could have an aftermarket part put in and a mechanic like one from YourMechanic come and put it in for you. It may save you money from the dealer pricing.

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Torn lower ball joints and torn tie rods – 2006 Nissan Sentra
ANSWER : Hi there. Unfortunately, diagnosing what type of service may have been performed by a different mechanic without physically inspecting the vehicle is difficult, as is knowing how long your vehicle can be driven with worn out ball joints and tie rods. The problem with worn out suspension parts is that they can fail and break, which can cause an unsafe driving situation.

It might be a better idea to have a professional mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, come to your location to inspect all the front end components for damage and give you an idea as to how much longer you can drive your vehicle before you must replace the damaged parts or buy a new vehicle.

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Car vibrates after cv joint replacement.
ANSWER : It would be best to have a new part installed rather than using second hand one. The old one my have had problems they tried to fix by adding grease and using the cable ties, but the part is now causing vibrations. Consider hiring an experienced technician like one from YourMechanic who can come out and take a closer look at what’s going on with the cv axle in order to offer a more personal diagnosis.

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Need to replace front left CV axle, do I need to replace the CV boot as well?
ANSWER : Hello, thank you for writing in. The damage done to the unit will dictate what exactly needs to be done. If the entire CV axle on one side or the other needs to be replaced, then the entire shaft is typically replaced at once, including the boots. If you need to replace part of the assembly, the boots are serviceable separately on a need be basis. In that case, you would need to know if you were replacing the inner (closest to the middle of the vehicle) or outer (closer to the tire) boot. Once you have made those determinations, corrective action can be taken. For more help with diagnostics or the repair, contact our service department to schedule an appointment.

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