Suspension makes crunching sounds

When I'm driving on a bumpy road, and around corners, I've noticed some crunching sounds. They are coming from the outside of the car, more specifically, from the front and back suspension area. The car runs great otherwise. What could be making the noise?
Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
There are too many potential causes to list. It could be anything from a failed sway bar link to a worn control arm bushing. The only way to diagnose this problem is have your vehicle’s suspension inspected first hand. I suggest you contact that team at YourMechanic, since we make house calls.

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Suspension components are typically made out of metal and need to pivot so that the vehicle can go over bumps. The pivot point, or bushing, is typically made out of rubber and can dry out, crack, or tear over time. Once this happens, there will be a crunching noise when the suspension component articulates.
Creaking

Creaking sounds indicate your suspension joints may be worn out or broken. These sounds are more likely to happen when you`re driving at a low speed. Alternatively, a creaking sound that gets louder over time typically indicates your car`s ball joints may be faulty.

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Bad Tie Rods: Tie rods connect a vehicle`s steering rack to the steering arm. This helps translate the turning of the steering wheel to the direction of the tires. When a tie rod end is worn or loose, they may produce a clunking noise.
A common cause of grinding noises under your car are failing wheel or hub bearings. Wheel bearings allow the wheel and tire to rotate and are designed for low friction, while hub assemblies have an additional responsibility of securing the wheel and tire to the vehicle.
Your body is trying to soften sounds you make and the rumbling is your ears contracting little muscles in order to accomplish that. They reduce the volume on yawning, chewing, and even your own voice. Those sounds manifest so near to your ears and so often that the noise level would be harmful without these muscles.
So it`s no surprise that a squeaking noise coming from your car when you drive over a bump can likely be attributed to the suspension. More specifically, the squeaking noise is likely due to a worn ball joint.
A squeaky suspension system is not just embarrassing with those squeaking noises and grinding noises, but it is also dangerous and can be extremely difficult to diagnose and fix. Your vehicle`s weight is supported using coil springs, leaf springs or torsion bars.
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There is no replacement schedule for most suspension struts and shocks, through many vehicles will need to have them changed at some point. Rough driving habits may shorten the life of these parts. Struts and shocks may need to be replaced anywhere between 50k and 100k miles.
A clunking, rattling, or squeaking noise from your front end while driving can be annoying and unnerving. Oftentimes, this noisy symptom means there is a problem with your vehicle`s suspension system. These sounds typically occur when driving over uneven surfaces, bumps, or potholes.
There are numerous reasons that could be behind a clunking sound. It may be the result of parts – like strut mounts and bushings – wearing out overtime, due to age, wear and tear, driving conditions and driving style. Common causes of a clunking noise include sway bar links, which are small links and easier to damage.
Driving with grinding brakes is simply not safe. Brakes are a critical component of safe driving and should not be overlooked. If your brakes start to fail: Don`t drive any further.
Is it safe to drive with a grinding noise? A grinding noise can indicate a safety concern, such as worn-out brakes or a bad wheel bearing. As such, you`ll want to address the problem right away to ensure your vehicle remains safe and dependable.
As you drive, the bearing rides on a metal axle shaft. This reduces friction as your wheel spins. When the bearings experience too much stress, they can become worn thin. This can cause a grinding or scraping sound to occur.
Definition: The crackling, crunching, grinding or grating noise that accompanies flexing a joint.
Hearing crunching noises from the neck during movement may not always require medical attention. These sounds can often occur due to air escaping the fluid surrounding the joints or from tight tendons rubbing or snapping against the bones.
The squeaking suspension parts are often associated with a lack of lubrication when metal-on-metal wear is happening in connections such as the tie-rods, suspension joints and steering linkage.
If you hear a clicking or popping sound coming from your wheels, chances are, it isn`t actually your wheels making those noises but your suspension or drive system. The most common cause of these sounds is damaged and dying CV joints.
A clunking noise when braking at low speed usually indicates worn out or damaged disks, rotors, calipers, or backing plates. It`s also important to check the suspension system, especially the bushings. Any issues with the suspension system will create loose movement when you brake, which will cause clunking.
Suspension Warning Signs

Continued bouncing after hitting bumps or a dipping when braking. A drifting or pulling to one side when turning corners. One side of the parked car sitting lower than the other side. Difficult steering.

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We need to do something more creative, which is why we decided not to replace the V40,” Kerssemakers told Autocar recently. Production of the compact luxury hatchback will stop this year, and the model that will take its place isn`t far. “We can`t wait too long to introduce the new car.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Suspension makes crunching sounds
ANSWER : There are too many potential causes to list. It could be anything from a failed sway bar link to a worn control arm bushing. The only way to diagnose this problem is have your vehicle’s suspension inspected first hand. I suggest you contact that team at YourMechanic, since we make house calls.

My tahoe is making a clicking sound in my front left Tire. I changed my wheel bearings an it still making that clicking sound.
ANSWER : Is your Tahoe 4 Wheel Drive? If so, there are front drive axles that have rubber boots that will often wear and the grease will leak out as you drive. Once the grease is gone, the joints are no longer lubricated and can make noise as they make contact. If the vehicle is not 4WD, sway bar links and worn control arms bushings are other items that may click and make noise as the suspension travels. Consider hiring an experienced technician like one from YourMechanic who can come out and take a closer look as your suspension noise to offer a more personal diagnosis.

Car sounds like golf cart when revving and braking; also leaking fluid; sound fades as car warms up
ANSWER : Hello,
There are a number of things that could make an engine noisy when starting up. Depending on the specific type of sound you are referring to, this will determine how to properly diagnose. If there is a bit of a hissing sound, this may be a sign of a vacuum leak. If this is more of a shrieking sound, this may be a sign of a worn out or out of adjustment serpentine belt. If there is a bit of a howling or growling sound, this may be a sign of a worn out or low on fluid power steering pump. A rattling or pinging sound may be caused by an ignition problem. An engine can ping (or knock) due to an improper combustion process. A "spark knock" is the result of combustion occurring too early. Early combustion can occur from carbon buildup inside the combustion chamber, a lean air/fuel mixture, and advanced ignition timing (spark plug firing too soon). A clattering type sound may be a result of improper lubrication in the valve train which could be a more serious problem and should be addressed as soon as possible. I would suggest having an expert from YourMechanic come to your location to diagnose and inspect your vehicle to ensure everything is in proper working order.

Van makes a thud sound when making a right turn at low speeds
ANSWER : Hello. The most common cause of this issue is worn out rack and pinion bushings. The bushings hold it in place and keep it from moving when you are turning. Over time, these will wear out or will get oil on them causing them to get soft. When this occurs, the rack and pinion will move when turning.

When this occurs the noise that you are hearing will happen. I typically start by getting the vehicle in the air to check it for any worn out suspension or steering bushings. If you need to have this looked at, consider using YourMechanic, as a certified mechanic can come to your home or office to inspect your steering and suspension. From there, they will be able to make any repairs that are necessary to have this sound resolved.

Car is making a metal scraping sound – 2001 Saturn L200
ANSWER : There are really only a couple possibilities: if the noise started "suddenly" or abruptly, as you describe it, you may have picked up something from the road that is somehow "lodged" somewhere rubbing a wheel, shaft (axle), or other rotating part. That possibility also could include something metal ON your car that has moved out of position (gotten loose) and is rubbing on a rotating component or suspension.

The second possibility is you have a part failure in the braking system (possibly worn out pads, but what you are describing is not consistent with that) or an internal part failure potentially in the transmission, torque converter, differential, axle (CV joint) or similar "moving" part.

For the first possibility, you might be able to track it down using a visual inspection but you have to get the car pretty far up off the ground. The second possibility would involve applying wireless "chassis ears" to various parts of your car and driving it to pinpoint the exact "area" (or component) which is generating the noise.

Once the area is pinpointed, it is fairly easy to go from there and identify the exact problem. Prior to using tools such as chassis ears, of course, it is possible that YourMechanic can pinpoint the noise just based on actually hearing the sound and its apparent location. Sometimes noises are so "diffused" throughout the vehicle that chassis ears make the diagnosis much more efficient though.

Rear passenger wheel making crunching sound
ANSWER : Possible causes of such noise are wheel bearings, a stuck brake caliper or seized sliding pins on the caliper torque plate, brake dust plate interference, loose caliper or torque plate, suspension interference with the body, and trapped foreign material in and around rotating components of the axle. In difficult cases, remote wireless microphones, known as chassis ears, can be used to determine if the noise is coming from the left or the right. If you want the origin of the noise pinpointed by a certified Mechanic, dispatched by YourMechanic right to your location, please request a chassis noise diagnostic and the responding certified mechanic will get this resolved for you. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

Engine makes clicking sounds while idling and at lower speeds
ANSWER : Hey there. The first noise you described sounds like valve lifter noise. You will hear this sound if the engine is low on oil. Check the oil level and add if necessary. The lifter noise is not heard at higher RPMs because the oil pressure is higher as the engine speed gets higher. If you have high mileage, you could benefit from the next higher viscosity oil. For example: a car that originally called for 5w30 when the mileage gets up past 100K, you can use 10w30. The reason is because as bearings wear out it becomes harder to maintain oil pressure and a slightly thicker oil can help get some of that oil pressure back. I’m not sure what noise you could be describing, but there should not be rocks in any engine pipes. It is possible you have a cracked exhaust pipe or something else loose that is rattling against a pipe. A certified technician from YourMechanic can come to your car’s location to inspect the car noise and make the correct repairs.

I have 2015 dodge dart and it’s makes a high pitch screeching sound on idle not consistently is it normal? Dealership said it is.
ANSWER : Hello, thank you for writing in. The noise you are hearing is not normal for most properly functioning engines, and although the damage may not be obvious right this moment, the component at fault may be on it’s way out. With that being said, the drive belt and it’s system of pulleys is most likely to blame. You will want to inspect the belt itself, the pulleys, and the crankshaft seal and pulley which provides it’s power. Since the dealership was not able to provide any information, you may have to wait until the component at fault stands out more, or pay to get a second inspection. For more help with that testing process, contact our service department to schedule an appointment.