Spark plugs in car incorrectly

I replaced the spark plugs and they are in incorrectly. The car won't start, and is backfiring through the carburetor.
Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Have a trained mechanic verify the work done to the spark plugs, and make sure they are in tightly. It is common to get the wires crossed, which could lead to the wrong cylinder being fired at the wrong time. A trained mechanic can go back over the work and find the mistake, or diagnose the cause for your car not to start. Consider our experts here at YourMechanic, as our mechanics come to you and help to avoid tow bills.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

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A mixture of air and fuel that`s got too much gas in it is called, “rich.” When a rix air/fuel mixture is ignited in the cylinder, the whole mixture won`t be burned up by the time the exhaust valves open. Then, the combustion process will flow to the exhaust where a backfire will take place.
Assuming all of your plugs and wires are in the correct locations and you haven`t messed with the timing at all, then the most common cause of backfiring through the carb (spitting or coughing) is in the morning when a carb`s air/fuel mixture is a bit too lean. This usually goes away once the engine warms-up.
Another possible cause of your backfire is a spark plug refusing to “spark” when the exhaust valve opens. If the air/fuel mixture has become too rich, unburned fuel is left in the exhaust system. The misfired spark plug ignites the rich air/fuel mixture, causing a loud “bang” in the tail pipe.
Using the wrong spark plug can result in incomplete combustion, misfires, and poor engine performance.
If too much fuel is added to the engine, it may not all burn up before the exhaust valves open — letting unburned gasoline into the red-hot exhaust headers, where it can combust and lead to a backfire. Too much fuel could be getting into your engine due to damaged and leaking fuel injectors or bad engine sensors.
Backfires are caused by an incorrect fuel to air ratio. These small explosions result in a loss of power when accelerating and a loud pop or bang. In some cases, this may even be accompanied by a burst of flames.
Backfires

Touching back on air to fuel ratios, a vacuum leak will likely make your engine run “lean” (too much air.) This means the engine cannot efficiently ignite fuel in the combustion chamber. When fuel builds up in the cylinders and combustion occurs, it will expel a backfire.

The injectors shoot a perfect mixture of fuel and air into the combustion chamber, but if there is too much fuel, the mixture becomes too rich. When this happens, not all of the fuel is burned by the spark, which may combust in the exhaust instead of the combustion chamber, causing an engine backfire.
Engine Backfires

Backfiring can damage other parts of your car if it`s allowed to continue, so it should always be checked out. But it`s sometimes caused by the ignition coil failing to ignite the fuel in the combustion cycle, and allowing it to infiltrate the exhaust system.

Overheating. Repeated overheating of the spark plug tip can cause the plug to prematurely fail. Overheating can be caused by many things like pre-ignition and a malfunctioning cooling system. Pre-ignition can lead to heat building up in the combustion chamber causing the spark plugs to fail.
The most common signs of bad spark plugs include start-up trouble, rough idling, sluggish acceleration, declining fuel economy, engine misfiring, and engine knocking.
There`s a variety of factors that can cause your car to backfire, but the most common ones are having a poor air to fuel ratio, a misfiring spark plug, or good old-fashioned bad timing.
On the other end of the spectrum, a bad fuel pump, vacuum leak, or clogged fuel injectors could cause an air-fuel ratio that`s too lean; that is, it has too much air and not enough fuel. Though this is the opposite problem, it can also cause a backfire as vapor escapes into the exhaust and combusts there.
Spark Plug Problems

The spark plugs ignite the combustion in your engine and if there are issues with the spark plug your engine will suffer and lose power. A replacement is essential to stop the loss of power in a car.

One of the most common causes of a sputtering engine is an issue with the vehicle`s fuel system—the filter, pump, and injectors. These three critical components work together to ensure fuel flows smoothly from the fuel tank to your engine`s fuel injectors, and then pumps into the engine evenly.
On an older car with spark plug wires, wires that get crossed or installed in the wrong order can inadvertently cause a spark to fire in a cylinder when it`s not supposed to. This could cause a significant backfire.
THE FUEL RATIO IS TOO RICH

Too much fuel and not enough air causes a ratio that`s too rich. This can cause some of the mixture to combust in the exhaust instead of inside the combustion chamber.

Sometimes, your car may have the following symptoms: an irregular idle, poor fuel economy, lack of power, stalling, or a high-pitched hissing sound from the engine.
Misfiring on one or more cylinders can cause a rough running or backfiring condition. Misfires can be caused by lack of spark or lack of fuel to any cylinder.
The main symptom we look for to diagnose and fix a backfire is where exactly the sound is coming from. If you hear a large POP from under the hood, this means that the combustion happening outside of the fuel chamber is on the intake side of the equation (often called a misfire).
A failing points and condenser system can cause rough running, misfires, lean and rich conditions. If the engine is difficult to start, and runs rough once it does start, then it is time to contact a mechanic to have a look at the system and find out exactly what the problem is.
Your vehicle`s spark plugs can actually cause the coil death. Dirty, misfiring, or worn spark plugs can damage the ignition coil, so plan to have your spark plugs changed when recommended.
Spark Plug Lubrication and Maintenance

WD stands for Water Displacement, so if your spark plugs are wet or you need to drive moisture away from ignition distributors, WD-40 will do the trick. Turn off the vehicle and spray the spark plug wires and the inside and outside of your distributor cap with WD-40.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Spark plug chaos. Rubber stoppers are preventing the spark plugs from coming out.
ANSWER : Hi there. Try using a pair of small needle nose pliers to pull off the rubber boots from the spark plugs. As you pull, twist the rubber boots to break them free. If you cannot get the rubber boots off, then try using some mineral oil on the boots to aid them off, then clean off the oil with soap and water with degreaser. If you need further assistance with removing the boots from the spark plugs, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

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Engine will not stay started. I have replaced idle control valve map sensor spark plugs spark plug wires no check engine light is
ANSWER : You have a problem with the distributor assembly. I recommend replacing the distributor assembly. This will replace all the possible sensors and coil for the ignition and fix the problem you have.

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After part replacements, spark plugs do not work – 1996 Lexus LX450
ANSWER : If you have a Check Engine Light on, first check for those codes to determine what engine management thinks is going on. If no trouble code, check the ignition fuse behind the driver side kick panel (carpeted panel at foot level on the left – for left-hand drive vehicles). If the engine is spinning quickly, and doesn’t appear to be meeting any resistance (as a motor with good compression would have), you may have a broken timing belt. If so – STOP, call a professional mechanic, like a certified technician from YourMechanic for help.

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my grand am will not start it has different kind of spark plugs will that make a no start on the car
ANSWER : Hey there:

Looks like you’re chasing an electrical gremlin here. First, the brand of spark plug may in some cases cause issues with starting. However, beyond brand is making sure it’s the right model and has the correct gap is more critical. The fact that you’re trying to start the car with throttle cleaner is a red flag. This method used to work really well with older, carburetor fueled systems, but with today’s fuel injected systems that are monitored by ECU’s, that typically causes a huge overload of energy, can fry the sensors and put you back to square one.

My advice here is to contact a certified mechanic and have them diagnose the starting problem you’re having, as by trying to fix it, the problems with the Grand Am may have gotten worse unfortunately.

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Just replaced spark plugs and wires and my car is still miss firing and I can’t pin point why and my old spark plug is oil covered
ANSWER : Hello there, many faults will cause your 1988 Ford Contour to have a misfire even after the spark plugs were replaced. When oil is seen on the spark plug this indicates that the valve cover is leaking onto the plugs. When this happens it fouls the plugs and can cause a misfire. Until the oil leak is addressed the spark plugs will continue to become fouled. If the misfire persists there are many potential causes such as the plug wires, fuel pump, vacuum leak, oxygen sensor, MAF sensor, or the cap & rotor. A qualified Technician such as one from YourMechanic will be able to diagnose your misfire fault and make any repairs required to resolve the issue.

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My car is shaking at idle and is losing power in the low end service engine soon light is flashing.
ANSWER : Engine misfires can be caused by many different problems and are generally caused by either a spark or fuel issue or in some cases, a combination of both. Spark related problems generally will result from things like ignition coils, crankshaft position sensor, spark plugs, spark plug wires or ignition modules not working properly. When the misfire results from a fuel related issue, this is commonly related to a lean fuel condition (lack of sufficient fuel supply to the motor). Fuel related misfires can be caused by many different things such as low fuel pressure, faulty or dirty fuel injectors, a faulty O2 sensor, a dirty or failing mass air-flow sensor, a faulty or dirty idle air control valve or a vacuum or intake leak. When the fuel supplied to the combustion chamber is insufficient, this results in an ignition (spark) that is igniting a less than balanced load of fuel and air. This results in a misfire or an explosion in the cylinder that is much less powerful than the other cylinders. This creates a loss of power that resonates throughout the motor additionally causing other problems with ignition and fuel timing. Due to the number of different things that may cause an engine misfire, the quickest and easiest way to diagnose this type of problem is to hook the vehicle up to a scanning tool which will download any potential fault codes that may have registered in the vehicle’s computer as a result of the poor running condition. I would recommend having an expert from YourMechanic come to your location to diagnose your misfiring problem.

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Car turn over won’t start have new battery starter and altinator and changed spark plug and spark plug wires and crankshaft sensor
ANSWER : Hi there. The first thing I would recommend would be to have a professional mechanic complete a digital scan of your ECU to see if there are any stored error codes that might pinpoint the source of your problem. However, one thing you might want to check yourself is the electrical harness connected to the crankshaft position sensor. In most cases, if this is diagnosed a being damaged, it’s actually the harness that is bad and needs to be replaced.

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My car turns over but won’t start, has no spark, distributer cap/rotor, spark plugs, and ignition module have been replaced.
ANSWER : Hi there. It sounds like the ignition coil has failed causing the no spark issue. The secondary circuit within the ignition coil has either burned up or shorted out. I recommend replacing the ignition coil. If you need further assistance with your no start condition, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

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