Slight steering wheel shimmy at 70 mph?

Is this likely due to worn rotors or wheel balance and alignment issues? There are no noticeable brake issues.

My car has 21000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
The tires could have irregular wear and/or internal belt damage as well as radial force variation. None of that can be balanced "away", excepting that there are road force variation machines that can be used to diagnose radial force variation and possibly make some corrections. The rotors are not likely an issue unless the vibration is occurring while braking. As an experiment, you could try moving the rear tires to the front to see if that lessens the level of vibration. If it lessens the vibration and the front tires are, say, below 5/32 inch of tread, I would just buy new tires, preferably Michelin or comparable high quality.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced mechanics :

Wheel Balance

When your car vibrates every time you drive at 50-70 mph, it is most likely that your wheels are out of balance. The vibrations will emanate from the steering wheel across the seat and through the vehicle`s floor.

Bad Bearings — Friction from bad bearings or inadequate lubrication can cause a shaky steering wheel. If bearings are the cause, you`ll notice that the shaking only occurs as you turn the wheel. To solve this problem, you can oil the bearings, or schedule a service appointment to replace them if there`s damage.
The most common reason for a car to shake is related to tires. If the tires are out of balance then the steering wheel can shake. This shaking starts at around 50-55 miles per hour (mph). It gets worse around 60 mph but starts to get better at high speeds.
Chances are one of the rims is bent on the inside and that is what is causing the wobble. 100%, it`s the wheel balancing that`s not been done correctly. Please get that fixed by a superior shop. Also check the lug nuts.
If your car`s engine isn`t getting enough oxygen, fuel, or spark that is needed for it to run smoothly, you`ll probably notice that a vibration is coming from the engine compartment. This issue manifests through jerks and shaking when your vehicle increases in speed, or rumbles within a specific speed range.
If your wheels are misaligned, your car will usually “drift” when you take your hands off the wheel, and the steering wheel itself may vibrate or shake. This is a pretty easy fix – just take your car in for an alignment, and the problem will be resolved.
Does your power steering start to jerk or shake in your hands while driving? This could be because of low power steering fluid. Another sign of failing power steering is when your car shakes tremendously while idling. Make sure to get it looked at by a professional mechanic.
Tires. Tires are the most common reason a car shakes when it reaches 60 mph. Tire balance, or lack thereof, makes the steering shake as the car increases in speed. Typically, the shaking begins as an automobile gets to 55 mph and only becomes more problematic as the speedometer increases to 60 or more.
Consistent Shaking: Alignment issues will cause constant vehicle vibration, no matter whether you are braking, accelerating, or maintaining a consistent speed. Steering Wheel Pulling: You may also notice that your vehicle is “pulling” towards one side of the road or another rather than seamlessly steering straight.
The most common reason for a car to shake is related to tires. If the tires are out of balance then the steering wheel can shake. This shaking starts at around 80 kilometres per hour. It gets worse around 100kmh but starts to get better at high speeds.
The commonest reason for a vehicle to shake is related to the condition of one or more of the tyres. If the tyres are out of balance, then the steering wheel can shake. This shaking starts at around 70-75 kilometres per hour (kph). It gets worse around 80 kph.
Misalignment can result in a machine having high vertical vibration on one end and high horizontal vibration on the other with other radial readings remaining low. Imbalance is not likely to cause this amplitude pattern. Vibration amplitude directly correlates with the amount of imbalance and equipment speed.
A vehicle that is operating normally should measure at about 1,000. When a vehicle`s RPMs fall below or are increasingly higher than normal, especially if the car vibrates when idle, something is not right.
Worn ball joints become loose in the socket and cause excessive vibration when the vehicle is in motion. You may feel vibration through the seat, steering wheel or brake pedal.
Another reason your steering wheel may shake at high speeds could be your tires. This is actually one of the most common reasons for steering wheel shakes, and it usually means the tires are either out of balance or out of alignment. If this is the case, you might notice shaking at 50 to 60 miles per hour.
Tyre balance

A common cause of steering wheel vibration, this is usually felt at higher speeds, and becomes progressively worse the faster the vehicle gets. On a positive note, it is also relatively easy to fix. Simply perform a wheel balance and check each tyre for any damage and wear.

Driving with unbalanced tires can be dangerous and cause significant wear and tear on the vehicle`s suspension system, such as vibrations in the steering wheel and seat, poor handling and stability, uneven tire wear, and increased road noise.
Driving with unbalanced tires can be dangerous and cause significant wear and tear on the vehicle`s suspension system, such as vibrations in the steering wheel and seat, poor handling and stability, uneven tire wear, and increased road noise.
The most common reason for a car to shake is related to tires. If the tires are out of balance then the steering wheel can shake. This shaking starts at around 80 kilometres per hour. It gets worse around 100kmh but starts to get better at high speeds.
Tire Issues

Your steering wheel may be shaking if your tires are out of balance. Drivers normally notice shaking around 50-55 mph, but this can happen sooner, for instance, if your front tires are losing air or sustaining breaks and cracks. Many of our customers report shaking gets worse around 60 mph.

Tire Issues

Your steering wheel may be shaking if your tires are out of balance. Drivers normally notice shaking around 50-55 mph, but this can happen sooner, for instance, if your front tires are losing air or sustaining breaks and cracks. Many of our customers report shaking gets worse around 60 mph.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Steering wheel does not center
ANSWER : The problem to me sounds like you have worn out bushings that hold the power steering rack and pinion assembly. This is why your steering wheel gets off center in the direction of the turn. Have the steering inspected and the bushings replaced if they are bad. You should have no problems then.

There is a slight wobble at speeds between 50 and 70 mph and I’m not sure what is causing it.
ANSWER : Hi there. It seems as if you have a few possible issues going on with your Jeep. First, if you have a bent wheel, the tire and wheel combination will never balance correctly; as weight distribution on the tire and wheel combination will frequently change when the wheel is not straight in the first place. Second, when you balance tires, it’s always recommended to do all four at the same time; so you can eliminate that from the equation and focus on other possible issues such as front suspension or steering components. It is common for tie rods and ball joints on Jeep’s to wear out and cause similar symptoms you’re describing. If you are stuck and want to ensure the right repairs are completed, it might be best for you to have one of our professional mobile mechanics come to your location and complete a steering wheel is vibrating inspection.

My steering wheel squeaks when turning left
ANSWER : The problem does need to be fixed. The steering wheel shaft may be binding in the steering column. You may also have another problem with the front end if the squeaking noise is not coming from the steering column. If the column is squeaking then you should have a mechanic come look at it and diagnose the issue. Only a qualified mechanic should inspect it since the air bags on the steering wheel may need to be removed to diagnose and complete the repairs. A certified mobile YourMechanic can come examine the problem at your home or office.

Slight vibration and a humming noise coming from steering column and the front wheels
ANSWER : Based on the symptoms you are describing, you may have a wheel bearing that has developed some free play and may also have dried out. This can cause both a vibration and a humming noise. If you have altered the size of the tires or wheels in any way and the tires are wearing improperly, this can also result in a traction control light, a humming noise, and vibration in the steering wheel. I would recommend having your truck inspected by a qualified professional to determine the cause of this issue. Consider YourMechanic as this inspection can be done from your home or office.

Problem with steering on one side only.
ANSWER : Hi there. The power steering system has a control valve that sends the fluid through the rack and pinion system. The valve maybe plugged up and causing the fluid to not return to the reservoir fast enough.

For the alignment issue, check all of the suspension and see what is loose or could be damaged. I recommend having an alignment performed on the vehicle after replacing any suspension or steering parts. If you need further assistance with your alignment, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

hi, im having a problem with my steering wheel it keeps on shaking when im like 55 to 60 mph I’vegot my wheels balance and a wheel
ANSWER : If a tire is defective (belt separation, uneven wear, even design defects such as unusual or uneven stiffness) no amount of balancing will eliminate a vibration. So, among the first things to confirm is the condition of the tires (and wheels…wheels can get bent or have excessive runout). All of the other causes of the vibration you are describing are relatively limited: loose lug nuts, worn or inoperative shocks, defective drive shafts, loose tie rod ends and any other loose component in the front suspension including wheel bearings. There is always also a possibility of an issue with other components such as worn, loose or broken motor mounts which might transmit a vibration through the body including the steering wheel. All of the possibilities have to be systematically checked out.

My car drives straight when I let go of the wheel, but my steering wheel is slightly crooked
ANSWER : If the vehicle alignment (camber, caster and toe settings) is in fact correct (within manufacturer specification), the steering wheel can be centered by adjusting the tie rod ends on each side of the vehicle. If the steering wheel is off center to the right, the left tie rod end should be increased in length and the right side tie rod end reduced in length by the EXACT same amount. If the steering wheel is off center to the left, then you increase the length of the right side tie rod end and shorten the tie rod on the left side, again by the EXACT same amount on each side. So, whatever increment you shorten one side by, you lengthen the other side by the exact same amount, until the wheel is centered. Tie rod end length is adjusted easily. An alignment machine is required to perform this adjustment. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

steering wheel won’t unlock my key turns only to turn lights on but that’s it can’t unlock steering wheel to start the car what to
ANSWER : The steering lock may not be unlocking either due to a faulty ignition lock housing or more commonly as the cars age a faulty spring at the steering wheel on the under side of the column. If the ignition lock housing is the issue the housing can be replaced. It s a bit tricky as the mounting bolt has break off heads and generally need to be driven out with a punch. If the lock is not disengaging because of a faulty spring on the ignition lock many owners have had the spring removed by having it drilled out of the housing. However, removing the spring may permanently disable the steering lock. The last option would be to replace the steering column. You may want to enlist the help of a mechanic who can recommend the proper repair for your situation.