Radiator and engine leaks

I took my car to a get a diagnostic and the shop told me I have a radiator leak, engine leak, and an ABS code. What do I need to have done to fix these problems?
Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hi there. An inspection of the radiator for white residue will be necessary. Radiator leaks generally occur where the plastic side tanks are mated to the sides of the aluminum radiator core. If this is the case, the radiator will need to be replaced, as these type of radiators are unserviceable. If the leak is not noticeable, then a pressure test in the cooling system will need to be performed to ensure cooling system integrity.

Engine leaks are generally either coolant leaks or oil leaks. Coolant leaks can usually be found during a pressure test. Oil leaks, will have an oily or dirt covered buildup at the area from the source of the leak. Oil leaks can also be traced by pouring in a penetrating dye into the oil system and then using a UV light source to look for a glow at the source of the leak. The source will either need to be resealed or the leaking component will need replacement. As far as the ABS code, it will need to be identified and the failing component will need to be replaced. You may want to enlist a mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, to inspect the ABS Light and also inspect the engine leak coming from an unknown source.

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There are multiple places where you could be losing coolant in your BMW. It could be from a failed cooling system component, faulty coolant reservoir cap, or something more severe like a failed head gasket.
If you suspect coolant has leaked into your engine, stop driving immediately and see a mechanic.
You can catch an external leak if you pay close attention to your BMW`s temperature gauge. If you`ve lost coolant from a leak, your car may start to overheat. A second way to spot a coolant leak is the smell. Coolant has a sweet smell which you may notice if it exits the cooling system.
A coolant/antifreeze leak can occur for a variety of reasons, including a blown radiator hose, a bad hose clamp, warped head gasket, or the most common reason, a foreign object kicked up by the truck in front of you penetrating the radiator itself.
Corrosion within the radiator is one of the leading reasons that coolant leaks. As the tubes get older and weaker, you may get sediment or debris inside that causes a leak. The sealing gasket between the tank and the radiator can also wear out, and that could lead to a leak.
If the coolant level is dropping and there is no external leak evident, then the coolant is probably leaking internally, into the engine. If the car has recently overheated then this could have caused the head gasket to fail. If it has, it could be leaking coolant into the combustion chambers.
The best way to confirm the source of the leak is to wash the radiator and hoses with water, and then start the engine and look for new signs of coolant.
It may be a broken hose and/or a hole in the radiator. Solution: Check your hoses to see if any coolant is coming out. Replace the hose(s) if you notice coolant coming out of them. If you notice coolant leaking out of your thermostat that can be an easy fix.
While driving with a coolant leak doesn`t pose an immediate threat to your well-being, we highly recommend that you avoid doing so. Driving a car that is leaking coolant can cause serious damage to your engine. Your engine can overheat, costing you big time.
Depending on the cause of leakage, you may get away driving with a radiator leak for a short time. Eventually, the lack of coolant will cause your car to overheat – which may in turn precipitate damage to various engine bay components. That`s why it`s a good idea to stop and inspect the issue as soon as you notice it.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Hey Allen. I just rebuilt (?) the engine on my 06 Acura TL. Now the engine line went on. They told me the engine? can blow up if I
ANSWER : Hi there. I think it may be a good idea to find a new mechanic. Fortunately, our mobile mechanics are able to complete most diagnostic inspections and complete a lot of repairs services at your location, and on your schedule. In what you are describing above, the current issue seems to be with your EVAP system, which is designed to relieve pressure in the fuel tank and also collect harmful vapors before they escape into the air. Now, in regards to the car "blowing up"; that’s a bit dramatic, but it is important to have your issues repaired if it’s related to the EVAP system. Here is what I would recommend. Set up an appointment to have one of our mobile mechanics come to your location to complete a check engine light inspection – (click here to set up an appointment). This will allow them to download the stored error codes that cause the light to illuminate and determine what parts need repair or replacement. Then, they’ll be better prepared to provide you with a repair estimate and complete the repairs in most cases for you.

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I have a leak in the coolant system that I have narrowed to I believe is the water inlet tube off of the lower radiator hose.
ANSWER : First off, I would say it would be best to pressure test the cooling system to verify where the coolant is coming from. With the complexity of repairs to the cooling system on this vehicle, it may be worth the time spent to pressure test the system before tackling the replacement. Now then, as far as replacing the o-ring seal on the water pump inlet tube, it should really only require the removal of the bypass hose, lower radiator hose, and the two (or three, depending on manufacturing changes) mounting bolts that hold the inlet tube to the block. I personally would go ahead and replace the tube while I was there, instead of just the o-ring. Granted, this doesn’t mention what it will take to get down to the inlet pipe, but this is all it should take once you have access to it. If this is something that you feel you could use a hand with, consult with a certified mechanic, like those available at YourMechanic.com.

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Have a leak from upper or lower radiator hose.
ANSWER : I would recommend looking at either hose to determine which hose the leak is coming from with the car running as this will pressurize the system and force water to the leaking point. Consider scheduling an appointment with one of our expert mechanics to come to your home or office to diagnose the leaking coolant issue and make necessary repairs.

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Are these oil leak problems related?
ANSWER : If the oil filter housing is integral to the oil cooler, or the housing had to be removed to service the cooler, a professional mechanic with knowledge of the limited service life of rubber seals would have absolutely (guaranteed) replaced the filter housing gasket that you are now belatedly finding leaks. However, if the leaking gasket is in an assembly that was not touched, or is not part of the cooler, they might be on reasonable grounds to have not fooled with it. These cooler configurations vary (from Mercedes Benz model to model) so, having the advice I just gave, you can just simply ask them what configuration you have and go from there. The bottom line is, if indeed, the gasket that is presently leaking was "right in front of them" while they did the warranty work, it should have been replaced simply as a matter of course. Indeed, the weak link on modern engines has become gaskets and seals. The engine will mechanically far outlast the gasket and seals but the problem is to replace all of them (once they all leak) you have to literally take the engine out of the car and take it apart just to put all new seals in. Please let us know how we can help further on this issue.

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Hi, I got my corolla 2012 engine overheated due to bad radiator, I replaced the radiator but the engine pick is not the same.
ANSWER : Hi There,
Depending on how severe the engine overheating before was, this may have resulted in a blown head gasket or a head gasket that may have partially caused a cylinder leak. When this happens, this can cause the compression in any given cylinder to drop as a result of the cylinder head gasket being damaged. As the gasket leaks and cylinder pressure (or compression) drops, this will result in a loss of power. A blown head gasket may cause a number of different symptoms. A head gasket that fails between cylinders will generally cause a misfire and potentially compression leaks from one cylinder into another. Low compression will eventually result in a rough idling engine. When the head gasket fails between a cylinder and the coolant port, coolant may leak into the cylinder causing it to be burnt with the fuel charge in the combustion chamber. This often results in misfires on startup, especially after the engine is run, turned off and restarted. I would suggest having a professional from YourMechanic come to your location to diagnose and inspect your vehicle to determine what the proper diagnosis may be.

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’98 Dakota 2wd-rear..with Air. Oil leaking in back of engine and above tranny. Leak is right around d-cap and a sensor post.
ANSWER : Hi there. It’s quite possible that this is a rear oil seal or oil pan gasket that is leaking; or perhaps a transmission oil tube seal that is leaking. The problem with trying to diagnose an oil leak is that typically the oil tends to spray onto different components underneath the vehicle. You might want to have a professional mechanic complete an oil leak inspection to help you locate the source of the leak and recommend the right repairs.

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Leaking top radiator hose? Leaking top radiator hose how to replace a leaking top radiator
ANSWER : If you have not done a job like this before you might want to consider watching a professional from YourMechanic do it for you, especially as the labor time is less than 1.5 hours so it’s pretty economical. The first order of business, of course, is to make sure that the upper hose is actually leaking and you don’t have a different issue such as a crack is the radiator itself where the hose attaches. Also, if that hose is leaking due to a break in aged rubber, the other "old" hoses should be inspected as well. A radiator hose replacement entails removing any plastic shields that prevent access to the hose(s). Then, you have to drain the coolant to a level below the lowest point that you will be working at. The hose clamps are removed and then you have to carefully "debond" the hose from the point it is attached to the tank. Over time, the rubber will bond really tightly to the radiator and you have to break the seal with damaging or severely scratching the radiator "nipple" (the part the hose slides over). Then you slip the new hose on (with clamps already loosely applied), apply the clamps and you are ready to refill. When refilling, you have to open the cooling system bleeder screws (if equipped) to ensure that air does not get trapped. Trapped air could cause the car to overheat as trapped air can block coolant flow.

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My radiator is spitting out coolant onto my engine and the check engine light is on but no overheating and its sometimes dont want to start should I get a new radiator
ANSWER : Hi there:

Before you decide to purchase a new radiator and have a new radiator installed on your 2005 Nissan Murano, I’d recommend having a professional mechanic complete a car is leaking coolant inspection first. This will allow them to determine why your radiator is spilling coolant, and also what’s causing your check engine light to occur. It could be a faulty coolant line or other cooling system component is damaged. It might even be caused by an air bubble.

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