Overheat leaking antifreeze

It won't get warm it's overheating the antifreeze leak out when I put some in I see it leaking out
My car has an automatic transmission.
Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Anytime you have a leak you notice as soon as you try and pour in any coolant then this is considered a major coolant leak and should not be driven until the leak is repaired. The coolant system water pump or a hose is leaking. Have the system pressure tested and repaired after the leak is located. If you overheated the engine then you may have damaged the engine. The engine would need to be rechecked after the coolant leak is repaired.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced mechanics :

It sounds like your car is suffering from a coolant leak. As a result of coolant leaking from the vehicle, your engine is overheating. A coolant leak can be caused by a variety of factors, including a cracked hose, leaking gasket, damaged water pump, or faulty radiators.
The most common reasons a Chrysler Sebring is overheating are a coolant leak (water pump, radiator, hose etc.), the radiator fan, or a failed thermostat. Coolant leak (water pump, radiator, hose etc.)
Your Engine is Running Warm or Overheats

The most common indicator of a coolant leak is your car overheating. At first, you may just notice your engine temperature registering higher than usual but, especially with longer drives, your car may start to overheat.

Coolant Leaks

Oftentimes when the thermostat fails, it remains in its closed position. As the engine overheats, coolant will overflow out of the thermostat housing. This means that coolant leaking out of your engine could be a sign that your thermostat has gone bad.

If your car is overheating, you should definitely not drive it. This could be due to several factors, including low coolant levels or a faulty cooling system. Driving an overheated car puts additional strain on the engine, leading to further damage and costly repairs down the road.
Antifreeze (aka coolant) is pumped through your vehicle`s engine as you drive, absorbing excess heat and exchanging it with the outside air. That means an antifreeze leak could cause the engine to overheat — and that can lead to major engine damage.
Corrosion within the radiator is one of the leading reasons that coolant leaks. As the tubes get older and weaker, you may get sediment or debris inside that causes a leak. The sealing gasket between the tank and the radiator can also wear out, and that could lead to a leak.
How long can a car overheat before damage occurs? It only takes 30-60 seconds of overheating for permanent damage to infiltrate a vehicle. As soon as you notice signs of overheating, you need to act. Failure to do so might result in troubles like coolant leaks, damaged radiator caps, and a faulty cooling fan.
While driving with a coolant leak doesn`t pose an immediate threat to your well-being, we highly recommend that you avoid doing so. Driving a car that is leaking coolant can cause serious damage to your engine. Your engine can overheat, costing you big time.
The average cost to fix a leaking radiator is $340, with a range between $125 and $600. Your total cost will depend on a number of factors, such as the type of repair needed, the type of radiator you have and the materials required.
As an important under-hood fluid, your antifreeze needs to be checked regularly, especially on older vehicles. An antifreeze leak can be caused by many different things: A blown head gasket can allow your coolant and engine oil to mix. This is dangerous for your engine and can cause a major catastrophic failure.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

No heat, antifreeze leak, overheating engine
ANSWER : Hi…stop leak products should never be introduced into a car engine‚Äôs cooling system simply because such aftermarket products are not a factory authorized or factory sanctioned repair technique. Some factory service manuals are indeed emphatic on this issue. A stop leak product is, in essence, a foreign contaminant and thus has the potential to plug up cooling passageways, the radiator and so forth. The only recognized technique employed by professional mechanics when it comes to a leak in the cooling system is to repair the leak, period. At this point, by far the cheapest and most effective strategy for you will be to have a mechanic identify the leak(s) (via pressure testing, if need be, on a cold engine), repair the leak, and thoroughly flush the cooling system to hopefully remove all traces of the stop leak product. The cooling system has to then be refilled with new coolant, while purging all air, and tested. On a vehicle with over 200,000 miles, it is possible the leak occurred along with other cooling system faults such as a failing thermostat, water pump, and possibly partly clogged passageways, particularly in the radiator. All of that will have to be evaluated to ensure that no further overheating occurs. To get this resolved promptly and professionally, by all means please feel free to request a leak diagnostic and the responding certified mechanic will get you squared away. If you have additional concerns or questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Read Full Q/A … : Overheat leaking antifreeze

There is an antifreeze leak on the passenger side that occurs when the vehicle is on for a long period of time
ANSWER : I would introduce UV leak detection dye into the system, pressurize the system while cold, and leave the system under pressure overnight (the pressure will slowly bleed off somewhat but such will not affect the test). If there is any external leak of significance, it will show up under the UV light.

If no leak is present and yet you still have a leak once the engine runs and gets hot, that means that the leak is between two surfaces that are opening up under hot engine operation. But the same protocol applies. That is, at that point, inasmuch as the leak detection dye is still in the system, you should just let the engine cool completely and use your UV light source again to methodically check all of the obvious possible areas of the system that could leak.

I recommend having a certified mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, perform an inspection to determine the source of the coolant leak and suggest any needed repairs.

Read Full Q/A … : Overheat leaking antifreeze

My car started smoking and antifreeze leaked out all over the place. Now it wont hold antifreeze so i tried pouring water into the
ANSWER : It is possible that your turbo is cooled with engine coolant and has sprung a leak. This would cause coolant to leak into the exhaust system because the turbo is connected to the exhaust system. It is also possible that because there is a turbo issue, this is preventing the vehicle from starting. I would recommend having any trouble codes read with an OBD2 scanner and going from there with the diagnosis. Consider YourMechanic for a car is not starting inspection as this can be done at your home or office.

Read Full Q/A … : Overheat leaking antifreeze

Car overheats, antifreeze leaks
ANSWER : Hello. If the vehicle is leaking antifreeze, then that needs to be located and repaired first. Most of the time it comes from a crack in the radiator or the water pump, though it can also come from a number of other places. If the leak is not easily found, I usually do a pressure test on the cooling system to see where it is leaking. Once the leak is repaired, the Check Engine Light can be diagnosed. It may have come on from the overheating, or for a completely different reason. Using a scan tool to read the codes is the only way to know what codes are in the computer. If you want to have this fixed, consider YourMechanic, as a certified mechanic can come to your home or office to detect the cause of the overheating issue and determine what repairs are necessary.

Read Full Q/A … : Overheat leaking antifreeze

I have an antifreeze leak internal I replaced the upper radiator hose new radiator as well can not see a leak or drip
ANSWER : Coolant leaks no matter how big or small should be addressed as soon as possible. As you noticed, the engine will run hot with a low coolant level. Even a minor leak can expand to a large or catastrophic leak with no warning. A minor repair now can turn into engine overheat and damage. The leak can be small enough now that it is burning away when contacting hot surfaces and not hitting the ground. If the radiator leaking is the cause of the coolant loss, then it should be replaced as soon as possible. The cooling system operates under pressure – usually 12-15 psi. A small leak can become a large leak because of the pressure. Have a certified technician address this as soon as possible. Do not use "coolant leak sealer" products as they are a temporary fix and can actually cause more damage by clogging small coolant passages and damage the water pump as well.

Read Full Q/A … : Overheat leaking antifreeze

Car is leaking massive amounts of antifreeze, and then proceeds to overheat.
ANSWER : Hi, thanks for writing in. It would be highly recommended that you not drive the vehicle until the leak is located and fixed. One and a half gallons is basically the amount to fill the entire cooling system, so the leak is definitely major.

To constantly drive the vehicle with this continuing overheating of the engine, serious damage will occur. It would be best to immediately have a certified mechanic take a look at the vehicle and identify where the leak is coming from, and make the repairs. The leak could be coming from a ruptured hose, a failed radiator, or any number of other possible areas.

If you need help identifying and repairing the issue, YourMechanic offers several options. They have trained mechanics that can come to your home, or place of business, and perform the diagnosis of the coolant leak and repair it as necessary.

Read Full Q/A … : Overheat leaking antifreeze

Using Bar’s stop leak for timing chain cover leak
ANSWER : Stop leak products are generally an amateur, unprofessional solution to a TECHNICAL problem. Factory Service Manuals do NOT recommend or specify stop leak products BECAUSE such products are NOT considered to be an acceptable repair strategy, save for rare exceptions. The composition of your question clearly indicates that you understand that the OPTIMAL solution is to just fix the gasket(s) and you are simply seeking a stop gap (no pun intended) measure while you prepare for that repair. After having researched these products for decades and having tried a few, talked to manufacturers and so forth, I would suggest that you just let the vehicle leak until it was repaired assuming of course that oil is NOT leaking onto a hot manifold thus creating fire and health hazards. Of course, it is best to just simply prioritize the repair and one possibility insofar as the cost, as well as the diagnosis, is to get a second opinion from YourMechanic.

Read Full Q/A … : Overheat leaking antifreeze

Are these oil leak problems related?
ANSWER : If the oil filter housing is integral to the oil cooler, or the housing had to be removed to service the cooler, a professional mechanic with knowledge of the limited service life of rubber seals would have absolutely (guaranteed) replaced the filter housing gasket that you are now belatedly finding leaks. However, if the leaking gasket is in an assembly that was not touched, or is not part of the cooler, they might be on reasonable grounds to have not fooled with it. These cooler configurations vary (from Mercedes Benz model to model) so, having the advice I just gave, you can just simply ask them what configuration you have and go from there. The bottom line is, if indeed, the gasket that is presently leaking was "right in front of them" while they did the warranty work, it should have been replaced simply as a matter of course. Indeed, the weak link on modern engines has become gaskets and seals. The engine will mechanically far outlast the gasket and seals but the problem is to replace all of them (once they all leak) you have to literally take the engine out of the car and take it apart just to put all new seals in. Please let us know how we can help further on this issue.

Read Full Q/A … : Overheat leaking antifreeze