Oil leaks between head and block Milky oil whiteish blue smoke

No sliggish idle runs fine just the three problems i listed above

My car has 150000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
It sounds like you may have a blown cylinder had gasket. A blown head gasket may cause a number of different symptoms. A head gasket that fails between cylinders will generally cause a misfire and potentially compression leaks from one cylinder into another. Low compression will eventually result in a rough idling engine. When the head gasket fails between a cylinder and the coolant port, coolant may leak into the cylinder causing it to be burnt with the fuel charge in the combustion chamber. This often results in misfires on startup, especially after the engine is run, turned off and restarted and in some cases may result in the engine not maintaining enough cylinder compression to even run or start. This type of failure may not always show with a compression test. I would recommend having an expert from YourMechanic come to your location to properly diagnose the symptoms you describe.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

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In the case of a blown head, external oil or coolant will leak out from the seams between the engine block and the cylinder head. These leaks are a sign of head gasket failure and a good sign you need to have any potential cracks and cylinder head twists looked at, immediately.
When the oil leaks into the combustion chamber, it mixes with the fuel and air being ignited and gets blown out of the tailpipe along with them. The result is white or bluish-white smoke. This is a problem because oil does not belong in the combustion chamber. It interferes with the process and corrodes spark plugs.
Oil Spillage and Leakage – If oil spills on the engine, it can burn and send up smoke without there being any overheating. The smoke will be blue or gray. Leaking Coolant – If you see white smoke under the hood, it`s most likely burning coolant that has come into contact with the hot components beneath your hood.
If you discover a milky brownish-yellow substance that is similar to the thickness of a milkshake, you probably have a gasket leak. The milky substance is oil mixed with coolant that has seeped past the head gasket contaminating the engine oil.
One possible reason for white smoke coming from your car`s exhaust is that the engine is burning oil. This can happen if the oil level in the engine is low or if the oil seal is leaking. If you notice that your car is burning oil, you should take it to a mechanic to have it checked out.
White Exhaust Smoke

White smoke billowing out of your exhaust means that coolant is likely leaking into the cylinders. This usually happens when there has been a breach in the head gasket, which makes the coolant create this white steam.

The symptoms of too much car oil

If it is overfilled, the following may occur: Dense white smoke – If you drive your car and see plenty of thick, white exhaust smoke, excess oil may be burning within the engine block, although fluids such as antifreeze may also be the culprit.

White smoke from the exhaust: This could be steam caused by condensation in the exhaust pipe or a more serious issue caused by an engine coolant leak. Excessive amounts of white smoke could indicate head gasket failure. Blue smoke from the exhaust: Oil is being burned.
If your head gasket is damaged or blown, engine coolant can leak into the passages for the oil and mix with it, which results in a milky oil cap. If left untreated, a blown head gasket can damage the cylinder heads and bearings and crack the engine block.
To fix milky oil in your engine, the engine needs to be flushed out with flushing oil. The head gasket and other components also need to be examined for damage, which is why you should get the vehicle professionally serviced.
You may even hear a knocking sound emanating from the engine, or the sound of a misfire, depending on how the head gasket blew. The sound of a misfire could be related to an overheating engine, coolant leak, or lowered compression as a result of rough idling.
A head gasket serves as a seal between the engine block and cylinder head, preventing engine fluid leaks and pressure losses.”
Faulty fuel injector: Another possible cause of excessive white smoke from the exhaust pipe is a bad fuel injector. The injector can leak or become stuck open and deliver too much liquid fuel into the combustion chamber. The excess fuel causes thick white smoke to be produced and released from the exhaust pipe.
White Smoke

It usually means that coolant is being burned in the engine, which means that something is drastically wrong. The most common cause of this is a blown head gasket, which can quickly lead to an overheating engine.

The most common answer to, “Why is my car smoking but not overheating?” is that there`s a type of fluid that`s landed on the engine. This can be motor oil, fuel, transmission fluid, coolant, or even condensation. It can cause your engine to smoke because it`s burning off that fluid from the engine.
Yes you can. The pressure from the engines combustion can blow into the cooling system. It can also blow water into oil.
White smoke usually means coolant is getting into the combustion chambers of your vehicle. This generally happens because of a cracked or leaking head gasket, which allows coolant to seep into your cylinders. In extreme cases, you will need to replace your head gasket.
One of the telltale symptoms of a blown head gasket is white smoke from the exhaust. It`s important that the smoke is white because blue or black smoke can indicate a rich running engine or an engine that is burning oil.
Motor oil turns milky brown when its been contaminated by water. Most vehicle coolant systems use a blend of water and antifreeze – and if the coolant system is allowed to leach into the engine oil, that tells us that an engine gasket has failed.
White Exhaust Smoke

If it`s a solid, opaque white, and resembles a billowy cloud, then this is a clear sign that there may be fuel in your oil pan since it isn`t hot enough to vaporize the fuel. This could result directly from problems with the combustion chamber.

A head gasket failure is a prominent cause of white exhaust smoke. The head gasket is located between the cylinder head and the engine block. A breach can cause coolant leakage, exposing coolant to the high pressure and temperatures of the combustion chamber. This causes white smoke to be emitted from the cars exhaust.
Pay attention to where the oil is coming down and try to trace it to the source. Use a flashlight to check underneath your car and around your engine – telltale drips might lead you right to the problem. There are several common locations for oil leaks in your car, including: At your oil pan gasket.
Engine Gasket

This is the number one area where oil leaks can develop and, we won`t lie, it`s devastating. There is a long seal between your cylinder heads, oil pan, and the engine block, and if this seal breaks, oil can leak into the cylinders and damage your engine.

An oil leak may be caused by metal chip debris lodged between the head gasket and the block, chip debris between the cylinder head and the head gasket, or by damage to the cylinder head sealing surface that occurred during the manufacturing process.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Oil was leaking, put in over 4 qts of oil and oil leak stopper. White smoke coming tailpipe,engine shakes, car dies. Oil leaking.
ANSWER : Oil additives are not recommended by any vehicle manufacturer for any reason. Additives that purport to resolve oil leaks are useless, a waste of your money, and may result in engine damage. Every vehicle manufacturer strongly recommends against use of these materials. There is only one recommended and approved repair strategy when it comes to oil leaks: fix the leak.

You can only add the manufacturer specified amount of oil to an engine. If you add too much oil, or too little oil, that will cause engine damage. You should check the engine oil dipstick to determine if there is presently too much oil in the engine. If there is too much, the excess will have to be removed to prevent engine damage.

The leak that you are referring to can be repaired if you request an oil leak diagnostic. If you have further questions or concerns as you decide what to do, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic because we want you to make the most of your repair dollars and help you get the best possible results.

My car is leaking oil i got an oil change for it last month but it is still leaking oil what will cause my car to leak oil ?
ANSWER : Most older cars have oil leaks. Sealing technology has just not kept up with mechanical improvements to engines so much so that leaks often kill engines rather than mechanical problems. So, it is not unexpected at all to have an, indeed many, oil leaks on a 23 year old car. Oil leaks vary hugely in terms of severity and priority of repair. Oil leaking onto a hot engine manifold is the worst case (the oil can start a fire; at best, you are left breathing oil fumes in the cabin, as the oil burns off of the manifold) while de minimus seepage of oil at the oil drain plug or oil pan gasket, while annoying and messy, if limited enough is not an emergency. Some leaks are easy to repair, while others literally require the engine to be removed just to get physical access to all the leak points. In your circumstance, if you smell burning oil, oil is probably leaking onto a hot engine part such as the exhaust manifold. A certified Mechanic, dispatched by YourMechanic right to your location, can perform an oil leak diagnostic and then let you know of your repair options and costs.

As far as the check engine light, that is not related to the oil leak(s). If you request a check engine light diagnostic, a certified mechanic from YourMechanic would use a code scanner to retrieve the specific diagnostic trouble code(s) from your car’s PCM that have caused the check engine light to illuminate. Using those codes, the appropriate individual vehicle components or sub-systems (often a sensor, circuit, and the like) are then carefully tested, based on specifications set forth in your car’s Factory Service Manual, to pinpoint the cause of the fault or the reason why the check engine light has illuminated. Once the faulty part or component is identified, it is explained to your satisfaction and the mechanic will let you know of the cost to repair. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

Are these oil leak problems related?
ANSWER : If the oil filter housing is integral to the oil cooler, or the housing had to be removed to service the cooler, a professional mechanic with knowledge of the limited service life of rubber seals would have absolutely (guaranteed) replaced the filter housing gasket that you are now belatedly finding leaks. However, if the leaking gasket is in an assembly that was not touched, or is not part of the cooler, they might be on reasonable grounds to have not fooled with it. These cooler configurations vary (from Mercedes Benz model to model) so, having the advice I just gave, you can just simply ask them what configuration you have and go from there. The bottom line is, if indeed, the gasket that is presently leaking was "right in front of them" while they did the warranty work, it should have been replaced simply as a matter of course. Indeed, the weak link on modern engines has become gaskets and seals. The engine will mechanically far outlast the gasket and seals but the problem is to replace all of them (once they all leak) you have to literally take the engine out of the car and take it apart just to put all new seals in. Please let us know how we can help further on this issue.

Smoke and possible oil leak after having oil serviced
ANSWER : Hi there. Since you drive the vehicle so little it can still be residual oil. It can take some time for it to burn off, especially if it pools up when it is spilled. If there is no oil left on the engine from the service then it is probably leaking from the valve cover gasket. This is the most common leak on this engine. If you want to have this oil leak found, consider YourMechanic, as a certified mechanic can come to your home or office to pinpoint the oil leak and and help you repair it accordingly.

lost all oil pressure, replaced the oil pump, low oil sensor, oil pressure sensor, oil pan gasket,
ANSWER : The fuel pump will not stay on if you loose oil pressure. This is why it is shutting off. The loss of oil pressure may be from bad crankshaft bearings or camshaft bearings. The engine oil pan should be removed and the oil pump needs to be checked to ensure that you put in the pick up tube seal to the pump and connected the pump to the block. Then remove at least one main bearing cap and inspect the bearings for excessive wear and crankshaft damage. If you need some help with this, consider YourMechanic, as a certified technician can help diagnose the issue with your oil pressure firsthand and help you fix it accordingly.

Just noticed a huge oil leak trailing my car. It seems to be coming from below the engine. I recently had my oil changed a month
ANSWER : You might have a problem with the oil filter leaking when you rev the engine and increase the oil pressure. This can be from a collapsed oil filter media or excessive oil pressure from the engine. I recommend having the oil and filter replaced using a good quality filter and have the oil leak verified to be from the filter. Make sure to not run the engine low on oil. If you are finding you do not want to drive with the leak, a mobile technician from YourMechanic can come to your home or office, and replace both your filter, and oil.

What causes oil leak between head and block and whitish blue smoke from exhaust plus milky oil
ANSWER : This is a common sign of a blown cylinder head gasket. In between the cylinder head and block is a thick gasket that seals off the combustion chamber and maintains separation of the oil and water passages through the cylinder head and block. Although not always, typically when the engine overheats, this gasket will fail causing the motor to lose compression and eventually quit running. As a result of this, the engine will commonly emit a white smoke from the exhaust that is the result of burning oil and water along with the fuel inside the combustion chamber. You may also notice the oil to be a milky color as a result of the water mixing with the oil. In some cases, the oil may also contaminate the coolant system causing traces of oil to be found in the coolant. This is generally a very extensive repair job that will need to be handled by a qualified mechanic. I would recommend having an expert from YourMechanic come to your location to diagnose your situation to determine the best options for your repairs.

Oil leaking from engine (not enough to leave driveway spots but still a leak) white/grayish smoke on startup only. No smoke while
ANSWER : External leaks could be from any of the oil seals on your engine and the cost to repair would depend on exactly where the leaks are located and how many seals need to be replaced. Certain seals are inaccessible unless the engine is removed, notably the rear crankshaft seal. Of course, as many leaks as possible should be repaired because leaking oil can damage external engine components such as rubber motor mounts. Oil leaking into the combustion chamber that is visible as smoke in the exhaust on start-up is typically due to failing valve stem oil seals. Those seals are replaceable. If you want the sources of the oil leaks identified and the repair estimated, simply request an oil leak diagnostic. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic.