New front pads & rotors (2mths) and hear a grinding noise when coming to a slow gradual stop. What could be causing this?

When coming to a slow or gradual stop I hear this grinding noise. The same noise I heard before I had my new front brake pads and rotors installed. I purchased new pads and rotors had them installed 2 months ago and the noise started 1 month after new installation. It's so loud it sounds like something is going to break or snap in a minute. I took it back to the place where I had the new ones installed and they double checked installation and said the new brakes and rotors are good and that some rotors and brakes just makes noise depending on the type or brand. You can only hear the noise
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Hello, thank you for writing in. The last technicians that worked on your vehicle are not wrong. There are certain types of brake pads that will make a squealing noise when the brakes are applied. These are typically made from a metal composite material. You can always research the brand they put on and find out more about the brake pads. This would give you a good idea of what you should reasonably expect. Are the brakes exhibiting any other types of symptoms? If there is any sponginess in the pedal, shaking or vibrating, hard stops, or other symptoms then there may be more cause for concern. In situations like these, if you are expecting to drive the vehicle a longer distance in the near future, it is recommended that you get a second opinion. Our technicians can dispatch to your home or office.

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Even if you replace the pads or rotors, bits of debris can get caught up during the repair process. This should go away as you continue to drive your car. If you`ve only had your brake pads replaced and not the rotors, the grinding noise could be coming from worn-out rotors.
It`s not likely that you`ll hear grinding after getting your brake pads replaced, since a metal-on-metal sound typically means you`ve worn out your brake pads to the point that their wear indicators, or in a worst-case scenario, metal backing plates are exposed and grinding against the rotors.
If you hear grinding noises when stopping or slowing down, your brake pads are most likely the issue. Remember, over time your brake pads lose their thickness and begin to make squealing noises known as “brake scrubbing.” As your pads wear down further, you`ll hear a grinding noise instead.
A grinding or growling sound when you press down on the brake pedal typically means that the brake pads have worn through and now are grinding into the rotors. Grinding or growling brakes indicate metal on metal contact – meaning you have no braking material left.
Just schedule a service appointment with a dependable dealership and tell the service professionals that your brakes are grinding when you`re driving. Then, take your car in, and they`ll remove any debris from your brakes. Once that`s complete, the grinding noise should disappear.
After that first 500 miles without overheating the pads, your new brakes will be ready for a few harder stops. What about grinding sounds? Grinding sounds are bad. Definitely have those brakes checked if you hear grinding sounds when you use your brakes.
The metal-on-metal grinding noise you hear is the steel part of the brake pad grinding against the brake rotor, and it`s not good. You need to get a brake pad replacement immediate when they are shot before they also destroy your rotors or brake calipers, which can be a very expensive repair.
One possible cause is debris or dirt stuck in the brakes, which can create friction and lead to a grinding noise. Another potential reason is a misalignment of the brake calipers, causing them to rub against the rotor instead of smoothly pressing against it.
A common cause of grinding noises under your car are failing wheel or hub bearings. Wheel bearings allow the wheel and tire to rotate and are designed for low friction, while hub assemblies have an additional responsibility of securing the wheel and tire to the vehicle.
As the damage worsens, a faulty CV can produce a loud click, popping, or clunk sound. When making a tight turn at a low rate, frequent brake noise at low speed (caused by damage to the outer CV joints) causes grinding noises. A bad CV joint also causes a vibration in the steering wheel and the car`s floorboard.
You may notice a grinding noise after you get new brake pads and rotors. This does not necessarily mean your pads and rotors are defective. Rather, your pads and rotors may be stiff, and you`ll need to break them in.
WD-40 Specialist Automotive Brake and Parts Cleaner is safe to use on clutch and brake assemblies, brake discs, callipers, brake drums, brake pads and brake linings.
In some cases, a grinding sound when braking can indicate an issue with the brake pads. However, if the pads appear to be fine and not worn down, it could be a sign of a bigger problem. One possible cause is debris or dirt stuck in the brakes, which can create friction and lead to a grinding noise.
As mentioned, new pads are typically abrasive and are sometimes coated with protective elements that can cause noise. After some wear, sometimes referred to as a “bedding process,” that brake pad squeak will go away.
The metal-on-metal grinding noise you hear is the steel part of the brake pad grinding against the brake rotor, and it`s not good. You need to get a brake pad replacement immediate when they are shot before they also destroy your rotors or brake calipers, which can be a very expensive repair.
The metal-on-metal grinding noise you hear is the steel part of the brake pad grinding against the brake rotor, and it`s not good. You need to get a brake pad replacement immediate when they are shot before they also destroy your rotors or brake calipers, which can be a very expensive repair.
The most common reasons for you hearing a grinding noise when you brake is likely because you have poor quality brake pads, worn brake pads, worn shims, worn brake rotors, faulty wheel bearings, debris stuck in brakes, insufficient lubrication on brake parts, or you`re simply not driving your car enough, allowing the …

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New front pads & rotors (2mths) and hear a grinding noise when coming to a slow gradual stop. What could be causing this?
ANSWER : Hello, thank you for writing in. The last technicians that worked on your vehicle are not wrong. There are certain types of brake pads that will make a squealing noise when the brakes are applied. These are typically made from a metal composite material. You can always research the brand they put on and find out more about the brake pads. This would give you a good idea of what you should reasonably expect. Are the brakes exhibiting any other types of symptoms? If there is any sponginess in the pedal, shaking or vibrating, hard stops, or other symptoms then there may be more cause for concern. In situations like these, if you are expecting to drive the vehicle a longer distance in the near future, it is recommended that you get a second opinion. Our technicians can dispatch to your home or office.

I installed new pads on front/back and new rotors on front only. I am now hearing a rubbing and screeching noise. Any idea what
ANSWER : Hello there, thank you for asking about your 2013 Acura MDX. You are most likely just hearing the material in the new metallic pads seating in to the rotors. The new pads on the rear old rotors will take longer to seat in and may be more noisy then if the rotors were replaced too. If you would like to have a mechanic diagnose the problem, a certified technician from YourMechanic can inspect your car’s noises.

I had front brakes and rotors replaced and now my brakes are squeaking and grinding when I come to a stop. I just had front and b
ANSWER : Hello, thank you for writing in. A squealing noise typically happens because there is a vibration between the pad and the rotor. This is likely pertaining to the caliper that moves the brake pad back and forth. While they may not be damaged, broken, or faulty, they can become misaligned and cause a squeal. Often a shim can be done or an adjustment done to resolve the issue. You may also need to grease the guide pins that the calipers move along. For more help and a proper inspection, contact our service department to schedule an appointment.

Grinding noise in the left wheel well on the front of the car
ANSWER : This is tough to tell without taking the wheels off and inspecting the rotors up close. You may want to check the pads and rotors for any debris lodged in them which may be rubbing against the rotors. If you need help having this looked at, a certified professional from YourMechanic can come to your car’s location to inspect the grinding noise and determine what needs repair.

put new front rotors and pads also new rear drums, but when braking vehicle vibrates like when you have bad rotors
ANSWER : Vibration of the type that you are describing is due to excessive thickness variation in the rotor and/or the rotor has excessive axial runout as mounted on the wheel hub. There is also a possibility that the rotor is warped or was warped on installation if the proper bolt tightening sequence was not used. Thickness variation and rotor run-out are readily measured. Thickness variation can not exceed .001 inches and runout of the rotor can not exceed .002 inches as installed on the wheel hub. If you measure .004 inches or so (as an example), you can be sure that that is the cause of the vibration. If you desire that a certified mechanic inspect the vehicle and get the vibration issue resolved, please request a brake system inspection. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

I purchased performance brake pads and rotors however I only have a front pair of rotors.. 2014 Ford Mustang
ANSWER : Hi there – while there may be a very slight performance gain to be had by also replacing the rear rotors, you will be fine without doing so unless the rear brake rotors are severely grooved or otherwise worn. The rear brakes contribute 40% or so of total stopping power, so optimizing front brake performance will accomplish the greatest improvement. For professional assistance with this repair, I recommend brake replacement performed by a mobile, professional mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, who will come to your location, diagnose this problem, and give you an accurate assessment of damage and cost estimate for repairs.

Horrible grinding sound after recently replaced front and back brakes and rotors.
ANSWER : Hi there. Were there shims installed on the old pads? New shims on the new pads? Missing shims can create noise while braking which is why the antiseize worked for a short time. What brand/level of brake pads did your husband install? Usually, the lowest priced pads are the noisiest. The antisieze that he installed is not recommended to be put on brake components as the high temperatures of these parts can cause the lubricant to run and contaminate the pads and rotors. There are specifically designed brake pad shim lubricants designed to withstand these high temperatures; these are the only ones that should be used if needed. I strongly suggest having a qualified technician perform an inspection to avoid replacing unnecessary parts and a possible safety concern. Your Mechanic has several available technicians that can assist you with a brakes are making a noise inspection.

After new brake pads & rotors, SUV has a grinding noise
ANSWER : Hello. It sounds like the brake calipers may be locking up and causing the grinding noise that you are hearing. I would check to see if the caliper hose is twisted. If it is, this may cause the brake fade that you are experiencing. It is also possible that the master cylinder is starting to fail which could also cause the problems you are having. I would suggest that you have a certified technician, like one from YourMechanic, complete an inspection of your brakes and determine if your master cylinder needs to be replaced, or if the brake calipers need to be replaced.