Need to replace variable timing solenoid

My car's Check Engine light came on. The diagnosis was that I needed to replace my engine's variable timing solenoid. I am not sure if I need to replace just the valve, or if I need to replace the entire solenoid.
Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
The first thing you need to check is oil level and quality. The Variable Valve Timing on your engine relies on proper oil level and quality. Low levels or dirty oil can throw this code as well as component failure. If both are good, the solenoid could be the cause. It is difficult to determine if the valve itself is bad since it is controlled by the solenoid. I would recommend have a certified mechanic diagnose your Check Engine Light and replace your Variable Valve Timing Solenoid.

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Even though you may technically be able to continue driving with a bad VVT solenoid, the issue can cause damage to additional parts, such as the VVT actuator. So, you should address the issue as soon as possible.
What are the symptoms of a bad VTEC solenoid? The most likely scenario with a VTEC solenoid failure is when you get a check engine light, and the car will likely go into limp mode, often leaving you fearing the worst.
A failing VVT system can cause valves to open at incorrect times, causing a massive decrease in fuel efficiency and engine power. Decreased performance – A failing VVT system can decrease the performance of your engine when it is under load. This can be caused by the variable valve timing not activating when it should.
Rusting, power failure, irregular pressure, missing equipment, an incorrect amount of voltage or current, dirt stuck in the system and corrosion are some of the possible reasons why a solenoid valve may not properly close or open.
Without a solenoid, turning your key wouldn`t start your car at all. However, you could still start your vehicle by directly interacting with the battery and starter motor. But starting your car this way would require you to pop the hood of your vehicle before each drive.
Not only do we recommend replacing both solenoids and sprockets at the same time, we recommend replacing all related timing chain components in the VVT system with high-quality Blue Streak® VVT components for a complete job and to reduce comebacks.
The dirty engine oil is the culprit cause of the faulty most of the time. Any debris or dirty in the oil will cause the stuck of OCV and VVT. Some Solenoids have oil filter screen inside the valve. Occasionally the faulty is caused by the screen is stuck with dirt.
When a solenoid is first energized, its coil receives a pulse of high inrush current that decreases as the plunger closes. If the plunger does not close, the high inrush current continues, which can cause the coil to overheat and burn out. This is the most common cause of solenoid failure and spotting it is easy.
Solenoid coil failure can be caused by a number of factors. Applying an incorrect voltage to the coil will cause it to fail and may cause the coil to burn out. Electrical surges or spikes may also damage the coil. Burnt out coils cannot be repaired and will need to be replaced.
In some cases, the motor may run (not very well) with a broken or damaged variable valve timing solenoid, however it will likely not run for long due to the critical role the VVT solenoid plays in the timing of the motor.
A bad or faulty connected VVT solenoid can and often does cause engine knocking, inconsistent idle and acceleration problems. The issue could be with the solenoid itself or the electrical harness connected to the VVT.
Most modern VVT systems utilize engine oil (hydraulic) pressure and some type of an electronic solenoid to initiate changes in valve timing, lift, and/or duration. One of the most common problems found when diagnosing a VVT system malfunction is low oil pressure or low engine oil level.
A failed solenoid may be debilitating for your machinery or manufacturing process but, thankfully, it`s a part that you can often easily repair or replace once you`ve identified the root of the problem.
Manual Reset Solenoid Valves

This is what is known as Manual Reset. To cause the valve to change from its rest state, the coil must be energised and the lever or knob pulled to the fully open position. If the valve is energised without the manual intervention, it will not open.

All solenoid valves should be cleaned periodically depending on the water quality and service conditions. When a valve is clean, you can hear a small metallic click as the armature operates. Excessive noise, sluggish operation or leakage will indicate that cleaning is required. Replace any worn or damaged components.
On average, a solenoid valve should last between 1 and 3 years.
Voltage testing

Rotate the multimeter dial and set it to measure AC (V~) or DC (V…) voltage. Note the results. If the solenoid is operating normally, the multimeter reads a voltage that matches the rated voltage of the valve; otherwise, the coil is faulty and needs to be replaced.

Ignoring a warning light or code being thrown by a faulty transmission shift solenoid can lead to serious problems, such as running your vehicle in the wrong gear for your speed and conditions. This can then lead to your transmission overheating and breaking down.
The VVT has an economy profile (below 6,000 rpm) and a performance profile (over 6,000 rpm). When the VVT activates, oil pressure will be exerted on an actuator that presses the camshaft slightly, helping engage the “performance” setting.
In some cases, the motor may run (not very well) with a broken or damaged variable valve timing solenoid, however it will likely not run for long due to the critical role the VVT solenoid plays in the timing of the motor.
Most modern VVT systems utilize engine oil (hydraulic) pressure and some type of an electronic solenoid to initiate changes in valve timing, lift, and/or duration. One of the most common problems found when diagnosing a VVT system malfunction is low oil pressure or low engine oil level.
A bad or faulty connected VVT solenoid can and often does cause engine knocking, inconsistent idle and acceleration problems. The issue could be with the solenoid itself or the electrical harness connected to the VVT.
Oil control valves are fed by the engines pressurized oil which allows or blocks the oil flowing through them to affect the timing of the camshaft. VVT cams have a control mechanism that change the cam position in relation to the timing chain or timing belt depending on how the oil flow passes through the VVT.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Need to replace variable timing solenoid
ANSWER : The first thing you need to check is oil level and quality. The Variable Valve Timing on your engine relies on proper oil level and quality. Low levels or dirty oil can throw this code as well as component failure. If both are good, the solenoid could be the cause. It is difficult to determine if the valve itself is bad since it is controlled by the solenoid. I would recommend have a certified mechanic diagnose your Check Engine Light and replace your Variable Valve Timing Solenoid.

Do I need to replace timing belt again of replacing water pump?
ANSWER : The water pump and timing belt should be replaced as a set if the coolant leaked on the belt. The coolant leaking on it will damage the belt.

Do i need to replace the receiver drier and/or the expansion valve when replacing the condenser assembly?
ANSWER : Replacing the system drier is absolutely essential. If the system has been open to the atmosphere (due to the leak in the condenser), the desiccant in the drier has been fully saturated with moisture. As far as the expansion valve, replacement is not normally implicated in a leak repair, in your case a leak in the condenser. To justify replacing the expansion valve, there would have to have been a diagnostic performed which proved a fault. If no diagnostic was performed, and there is no evidence of a fault, then it is pointless to replace the valve. But, again, drier replacement is absolutely essential. To add the drier to your order, you can simply add a note to the mechanic in your order and/or add it as a service (you will see a link that you can click on to "add services" or write in specific services). If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

Replacing timing chain 2004 Mazda 6
ANSWER : Hello – if the mechanic waited until the car was re-assembled after the water pump job to suggest timing chain repair, then "yes", s/he was not doing you any favor. Doing the timing chain repair separately is essentially repeating the labor. There are a number of related parts involved in a timing chain service: the timing chain itself, one or more timing chain guides, a tensioner, an idler puller(sometimes), and various o-rings and seals. Many parts manufacturers package these as a "kit", and the technician simply orders the correct kit for your engine in order to be sure they get all the right bits. I recommend a timing chain service performed by a mobile, professional mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, who will come to your location, diagnose this problem, and give you an accurate assessment of damage and cost estimate for repairs.

okay I’m replacing the water pump to my jeep liberty 2005 do i need to replace the timing belt also?
ANSWER : Hi there. Anytime you replace a water pump, it is always a good idea to replace the timing belt at the same time, especially if your vehicle has at least 100,000 miles or more. Replacing the timing cover gaskets and main seal will also be a good idea as those are the primary sources of oil leaks.

I had my timing belt and water pump replaced 45000 miles ago. Now I am told I need to replace water pump. Is this normal?
ANSWER : Hello there, 45,000 miles is a short lifespan for a water pump on your 2000 Honda Odyssey. There are a few reasons the water pump will need to be replaced, such as a pump bearing failure, water pump seal leak, or rust/contamination damaging the pump. Faults such as rust or particles in the cooling system are formed in the cooling system over time and the parts break down, or regular coolant flushes are not performed. These particles can cause the pump to fail prematurely. It would be a good idea to ask why the water pump needs to be replaced or take note of any symptoms you are experiencing with the car before moving forward with this. If you would like to have an expert give you a second opinion on this, a certified technician from YourMechanic can come to your location to inspect the car and replace the water pump if necessary.

I need my timing belt replaced for my 2011 Chevy Aveo and I was wondering if it’s also necessary to replace the water pump? Someon
ANSWER : The timing belt should be changed at 100,000 miles. If the water pump is driven by the timing belt, the pump absolutely should be changed when you change the timing belt. Indeed, aftermarket timing belt kits include the water pump, along with the timing belt and components, inasmuch as changing the water pump is recommended. All rotating pulleys that the timing belt rides on should be changed as well (included in kits) because the grease in those pulleys dries out. If the water pump is NOT driven by the timing belt (some Aveo’s) there is no need to change the pump at this time as it can be accessed later without disturbing the timing belt. Dealer OEM parts are preferred but if you buy aftermarket parts use only a reputable name brand such as Gates. If you desire that the timing belt, components, and water pump be installed by a certified Mechanic, dispatched by YourMechanic right to your location, please request timing belt replacement and the responding certified mechanic will get this taken care of for you. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

Does the CV boot need to be replaced or do i need to replace the whole axle? 2008 Chevrolet Uplander
ANSWER : Hello – the CV joint or axle boot is available separately from a variety of sources. What your mechanic may be saying however, is that given your mileage, it would be best to replace the whole axle assembly for reliability reasons. Replacing the CV boot requires considerable labor as well, and your best repair $ may be to go ahead and replace the whole axle assembly. I would recommend a CV axle replacement by a mobile, professional mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, who will come to your location, diagnose this problem, give you an accurate assessment of damage and cost estimate for repairs.