My car runs hot, then cools down, and then heats up again

Car runs hot then cools then will heat up again. I I have no warm air coming into the car when the car is running hot I've been putting antifreeze in but it's using it up as fast as I can put it in is it possible that my water pump is bad

My car has 149688 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hello. Your attention should be turned toward the fact you are going through a lot of coolant. If you can not visibly see a leak spraying or any evidence of a leak on the ground, then your engine is consuming the coolant. You should check your oil and see if there is any milky looking fluid or residue there. This is going to tell you whether coolant is mixing in with your oil, and the cause in this case would likely be a failed head gasket. These are easy to replace, but very hard to access, making for a tricky repair. Not that we recommend inhaling exhaust fumes, but if you smell a sweet odor coming from the vehicle, that too is a sign you are burning coolant. A cracked head will also cause this symptom. Further testing and an inspection by a certified technician, such as one from YourMechanic, is needed to properly diagnose your coolant level problem.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced mechanics :

Bad Engine Sensors

In terms of a car overheating then going back to normal, you can suspect a faulty coolant temperature sensor. The sensor detects the engine`s temperature and is connected to the temperature gauge on your dashboard.

can cause head gasket failure but, conversely, a blown head gasket can also cause the engine to overheat. Hot exhaust gases can leak into the cooling system, or coolant can leak into the cylinders and be burned off as steam, either way, the end result is an overheating engine.
It sounds like the heater core is clogged and restricting the flow of coolant in the coolant system. There is also the possibility that the new radiator is defective and is causing the car to overheat. The head gasket could also be blown.
In general, it`s because something`s wrong within the cooling system and heat isn`t able to escape the engine compartment. The source of the issue could include a cooling system leak, faulty radiator fan, broken water pump, or clogged coolant hose.
If your car begins to overheat when idling, but the temperature gauge moves back down once you get going, it`s most likely due to a broken radiator fan. When the coolant goes to the radiator, it`s spread over a large surface area to cool it down. Airflow further cools it before it returns to the engine.
A leaking radiator, overheating, white-colored or sweet-smelling exhaust and green-tinted spark plugs are all signs the head gasket is wearing, broken or on its way to that status.
Pump overheating is one of the most common problems with a pump. It can be caused by several factors, including lubrication, damaged bearings, clogged filters and others. Overheating can cause a pump to seize up and fail, leading to costly repairs or replacement.
If it gets hot at all times, then it may have a clogged radiator, or more commonly a leaking head gasket. I would perform a block test prior to changing anything else. If that fails the test, then the engine will need to be disassembled and repaired. If it passes, then it may need a radiator.
The minimum mark is the lowest amount of coolant your engine will need and going below this may cause overheating problems. On the other hand, overfilling your coolant tank above the maximum level when it`s cold will mean that there`s nowhere for the coolant to expand into once it heats up.
How long can a car overheat before damage occurs? It only takes 30-60 seconds of overheating for permanent damage to infiltrate a vehicle. As soon as you notice signs of overheating, you need to act. Failure to do so might result in troubles like coolant leaks, damaged radiator caps, and a faulty cooling fan.
If you find that you`ve got a car running hot but not overheating there might be a few reasons: Clogged or damaged radiator. Low coolant level. Damaged water pump or thermostat.
If your car engine is still hot after two hours, there are a couple of possible causes. It could be overheating due to low coolant levels, a broken fan belt, a clogged radiator, a stuck thermostat, or electric cooling fan failure.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

My car runs hot, then cools down, and then heats up again
ANSWER : Hello. Your attention should be turned toward the fact you are going through a lot of coolant. If you can not visibly see a leak spraying or any evidence of a leak on the ground, then your engine is consuming the coolant. You should check your oil and see if there is any milky looking fluid or residue there. This is going to tell you whether coolant is mixing in with your oil, and the cause in this case would likely be a failed head gasket. These are easy to replace, but very hard to access, making for a tricky repair. Not that we recommend inhaling exhaust fumes, but if you smell a sweet odor coming from the vehicle, that too is a sign you are burning coolant. A cracked head will also cause this symptom. Further testing and an inspection by a certified technician, such as one from YourMechanic, is needed to properly diagnose your coolant level problem.

A/C and heat are not working properly. Car blows heat in summer and cool air in winter.
ANSWER : Common causes of no cabin heat include malfunctioning blend door(s) (part of the in-dash ventilation network), a faulty or stuck heater control valve, a plugged heater core, stuck open engine cooling thermostat, collapsed hoses, and low coolant level. The cost to resolve the problem depends on which of the foregoing faults is the cause. If you desire a diagnostic to determine exactly why there is no cabin heat, please request a non functioning cabin heater diagnostic and the responding mechanic will come right to your location and get this resolved for you promptly.

With regard to your air conditioning system, if merely re-charging the system restored normal operation but the a/c ceased to function after a month or so, that scenario typically suggests a leak. Some leaks are really cheap to repair, like if a couple o-rings need to be replaced in system piping but if the leak is at the compressor shaft seal, that repair is more costly. It is not expensive to find the leak and diagnose the system and once the leak is found the mechanic can let you know of the exact cost to repair the leak and re-charge the system. If you desire that service please request an a/c system diagnostic – suspected refrigerant leak and the responding certified mechanic will get this taken care of for you. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you

Car runs hot and doesnt keep coolant
ANSWER : Hi there. Most of the time, overheating issues are caused by a radiator leak, leak in the coolant lines, or a failed thermostat. The worse case scenario is that you’d have a blown head gasket.

However, if you’re seeing small drips on the ground, the leak could be coming from one of the hoses, which might also introduce air pockets into the coolant line. This could be what’s causing your overheating situation. However, it might be a good idea to have a local certified mechanic stop by your home to do a complete cooling system inspection. That could save you a lot of money instead of replacing parts that you are unsure are faulty.

My car is running hot, what could be the problem?
ANSWER : There could be an issue with the cylinder head gaskets. Antifreeze can break down and become acidic if not replaced as normal maintenance. The head gasket material erodes and can cause engine compression to build up in the coolant system. This will prevent the flow of coolant which can create an overheating condition.

There is a test that can be done to check whether there is carbon monoxide in the coolant system; it involves special equipment.

I recommend having your overheating condition inspected, and perhaps have a block test performed.

When the car heats up the brakes squeak. When the car cools down they’re fine, but when it heats up they start squeaking again.
ANSWER : Hi, thanks for writing in. Pads and rotors can become "glazed" if overheated. If this happens, the bonding material in the brake pads can rise up out of the pads and transfer to the rotors, causing a bluish discoloration to the rotors and cause a squeak. Removing the pads, sanding the surface of them and the rotors may help. If not, a light resurfacing of the rotors and using some brake lube on the backs of the pads should help. If you would like help, consider having an expert automotive technician from YourMechanic come to your home or office to inspect your brake system for you, and make or suggest any repairs or cleaning as needed.

I have a mini r53 s (supercharged) runs fine but when car stop and AC is on for a wile car overheat
ANSWER : Your question makes me think of a case I ran into a few years ago. The owner had modified his car but when he installed his fans, one of them was wired backwards so the fan ran in reverse. The two fans were fighting each other which was just like having no fan at all, so the car heated up while it was sitting still then it cooled off when moving. Check the rotation of both the fans before you check anything else. If that’s OK, you may be able to track down the problem with a non-contact thermometer, follow the course of the coolant with the beam. The radiator should be about 30 degrees or more cooler at the exit than at the entrance. If you need help with this, contact Your Mechanic. They can send a technician to your home to check out your overheating problem and let you know what can be done for it.

Car runs hot replaced the thermostat still running hot whats the problem
ANSWER : Overheating can be caused by a number of things such as low coolant levels, a faulty thermostat, a clogged radiator or a failing coolant fan switch. As you may know the coolant fan switch helps to maintain the proper coolant temperature by turning on and off at specific temperature thresholds. When this switch is not working properly, this can cause the fans to come on intermittently, all the time or sometimes not at all. When this happens you will notice a temperature spike and drop occasionally as the fan comes on and off. When your thermostat is not working properly or is stuck closed, this will not allow the coolant to properly circulate through the engine, which may cause the engine temperature to fluctuate erratically or in some cases just remain hot. You may also have a water pump that is beginning to fail. Water pumps often times will begin to produce a bit of a whining sound when they are starting to fail. A common problem also associated with this is the water pump may begin to leak around the water pump shaft due to the seal being damaged. In addition to leaking around the pump, you may have a leak elsewhere in the cooling system coming from one of the hoses going to or from the radiator. Lastly, you may have a failing cylinder head gasket allowing coolant to leak from the water passages into the cylinders resulting in the coolant being burnt in the combustion chamber with the fuel. If this is the case, you may also notice a bit of white smoke coming from your exhaust which is a product of the coolant being turned into a steam like vapor. I would suggest having an expert from Your Mechanic come to your home to diagnose your cooling system.

Ac blows hot in summer heat blows cool in winter
ANSWER : I can understand your confusion and frustration, I believe your Kia is experiencing a few different issues that could all together duplicate the concerns you are experiencing.

It would appear that one or more blend doors, these are inside the dashboard that direct or block fresh air from outside the vehicle entering the cabin, is stuck open. This would explain why you experience cold air in the winter and hot air in the summer. There is a different blend door that will direct or block heat from the heater core inside your dashboard, this door may also be stuck. In regards to the air conditioning, there are a few reasons why it is not working as it is supposed to, however the most common is due to lack of refrigerant.

As you can see, there is a lot going on, therefore I recommend enlisting help of a certified mobile mechanic to stop by and go over your Sedona with you in person and diagnose why you are experiencing these temperature concerns.