Leaking oil into the intake and PCV and catalytic converter

Leaking oil into intake PCV and catalytic converter

My car has 150000 miles.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
You would need to have the entire crankcase ventilation system checked and serviced first to make sure all the PCV valves are clean and working correctly, or if excessive oil will be consumed and get in the intake. The turbo would need to be inspected to see if it’s an oil seal leaking excessively and getting oil into the intake system. Once these are checked and repaired as needed, then have the intake system cleaned with combustion cleaner and then check engine blowby to see if it is excessive and causing crankcase overpressure conditions from compression leaking past the piston rings. If you need help having this checked, a professional from YourMechanic can come to your car’s location to pinpoint the oil leak and run the necessary tests to have this repaired properly.

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It can also be due to any number of small design issues or worn-out engine components. The oil that`s burned in the engine ends up flowing through the exhaust system, where it can eventually cause catalytic converter failure in much the same way as a coolant leak.
Part of your engine oil will evaporate and make it past combustion and into a catalytic converter. Too much engine oil in your catalytic converter will eventually poison catalyst surfaces, and it will then fail to reduce your emissions.
Specifically, if the PCV valve malfunctions, or is stuck open, it allows some of the oil that is used to lubricate the pistons and cylinders to escape. This wayward oil can then find its way to the surface of the engine`s spark plugs, resulting in a condition known as “oil fouling.”
Unless you repair the PCV system, this excessive pressure will continue causing leaks. The bottom line is this: Your service sales staff should understand that a neglected PCV system may cause oil leaks. It also can adversely affect engine performance and gas mileage, but that`s another topic.
Most catalytic converter failures fall under one of three categories: Overheated, melted or broken converters.
Leaking Oil Filter

The filter is one of the most common causes of an oil leak. Ideally, the oil filter should be replaced with every oil change. If you change your oil at home, you may forget this important step or the new filter may not be installed properly.

Usually, a clogged catalytic converter will overheat and can have damaging impacts on your car`s engine. Anytime you experience an engine misfire, contact a reliable mechanic right away for catalytic converter repair or replacement services.
Driving with A Failed Catalytic Converter

If you`re noticing slow powertrain performance, reduced acceleration, a smell of rotten eggs or sulfur from the exhaust, dark exhaust smoke, or extreme heat from under the vehicle, these are symptoms of a clogged Catalytic Converter, and it should be replaced quickly.

The PCV valve is designed to allow air to escape the crankcase when the pressure inside grows too high — but when it malfunctions, it can begin sucking oil into the engine and burning it there instead.
Can I drive with a bad PCV valve? Sure — you can drive your vehicle even with a bad PCV valve. As mentioned above, it`s very unlikely you`ll even notice a difference.
Yes, the oxygen sensor can damage the catalytic converter, although the damage is indirect. What actually happens is that the oxygen sensor malfunctions and sends incorrect data to your vehicle`s main computer chip.
Bad spark plugs or damaged exhaust valves can also destroy a catalytic converter. It is important to keep your engine and fuel injection system in good working condition.
Use a flashlight to check underneath your car and around your engine – telltale drips might lead you right to the problem. There are several common locations for oil leaks in your car, including: At your oil pan gasket. At your oil filter or drain plug.
As we just mentioned, a missing catalytic converter will make your engine very loud. In fact, the engine will roar. You may not have realized this but the catalytic converter helps to muffle some of the engine and exhaust noise. Now that the converter is missing, your engine will be louder than normal.
One of the first symptoms commonly associated with a bad or failing catalytic converter is a reduction in engine performance. The catalytic converter is built into the vehicle`s exhaust system, and as a result, can affect the performance of the engine if it develops any problems.
What Are Potential Issues With a Catalytic Converter? Catalytic converters often last for 10 years or more, but they can become contaminated, clogged, overheated or physically damaged — leading to sluggish engine performance and, eventually, engine shutdown.
For the most part, anything that affects the engine performance will lead to trouble shifting gears in your car. A clogged catalytic converter makes the engine work harder, which in turn makes it difficult to shift the transmission.
Driving with a bad catalytic converter has drawbacks, like lower fuel economy and frequent stalling. You could also receive a ticket or fine and fail an emissions test.
It is caused by excessive carbon deposits or engine sludge developing inside the crankcase. When the oil does not flow efficiently, excessive engine oil pressure will be created and cause extra oil to push through the PCV valve and into the air intake.
A breather pipe allows an internal combustion engine to vent crankcase pressure out of the engine. When an engine suffers from a clogged breather pipe, the engine overheats and often begins to misfire. Oil consumption increases and the engine seems to have less power.
Some of the more common factors that can contribute to oil consumption are a clogged PCV or EGR valve or air filter or an excessively rich fuel mixture – often caused by a clogged air filter.
If engine wear causes too much crankcase pressure it will overwhelm the PCV system and lead to excessive oil leaks. Excess crankcase pressure may also occur if the PCV system vacuum supply becomes restricted.
Found under the hood of your BMW, the PCV valve is black and has a red handle. It sucks the blow-by gases away from the crankcase via the intake manifold. It then returns them to the engine where they can be properly burned. On a basic level, the PCV valve is a fuel recycler.
Car manufacturers suggest that PCV valves be cleaned or replaced after somewhere between 20,000 to 50,000 miles of driving. Consult your owner`s manual to see where the PCV valve is located on your vehicle and what the recommended service intervals are.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

My car is leaking oil i got an oil change for it last month but it is still leaking oil what will cause my car to leak oil ?
ANSWER : Most older cars have oil leaks. Sealing technology has just not kept up with mechanical improvements to engines so much so that leaks often kill engines rather than mechanical problems. So, it is not unexpected at all to have an, indeed many, oil leaks on a 23 year old car. Oil leaks vary hugely in terms of severity and priority of repair. Oil leaking onto a hot engine manifold is the worst case (the oil can start a fire; at best, you are left breathing oil fumes in the cabin, as the oil burns off of the manifold) while de minimus seepage of oil at the oil drain plug or oil pan gasket, while annoying and messy, if limited enough is not an emergency. Some leaks are easy to repair, while others literally require the engine to be removed just to get physical access to all the leak points. In your circumstance, if you smell burning oil, oil is probably leaking onto a hot engine part such as the exhaust manifold. A certified Mechanic, dispatched by YourMechanic right to your location, can perform an oil leak diagnostic and then let you know of your repair options and costs.

As far as the check engine light, that is not related to the oil leak(s). If you request a check engine light diagnostic, a certified mechanic from YourMechanic would use a code scanner to retrieve the specific diagnostic trouble code(s) from your car’s PCM that have caused the check engine light to illuminate. Using those codes, the appropriate individual vehicle components or sub-systems (often a sensor, circuit, and the like) are then carefully tested, based on specifications set forth in your car’s Factory Service Manual, to pinpoint the cause of the fault or the reason why the check engine light has illuminated. Once the faulty part or component is identified, it is explained to your satisfaction and the mechanic will let you know of the cost to repair. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

2006 BMW oil filter gasket keeps breaking and oil leaks from oil filter. Oil leaks only after starting car in morning. PCV valve?
ANSWER : Hi There,
It sounds like you may need to replace the oil cap o-ring. If you haven’t done this before there are two O-rings to replace; a small green one on the base of the filter cap stem and the large black one that seals the filter cap (which seems to be the one you are having issues with). The large O-ring sits in a small square-shaped groove that is at the base of the oil filter cap. It is very easy to not properly seat the large O-ring because the threads for the oil cap are quite large and will accept the O-ring if you are not careful. I would suggest having a professional from YourMechanic come to your location to take a look at your vehicle.

Oil was leaking, put in over 4 qts of oil and oil leak stopper. White smoke coming tailpipe,engine shakes, car dies. Oil leaking.
ANSWER : Oil additives are not recommended by any vehicle manufacturer for any reason. Additives that purport to resolve oil leaks are useless, a waste of your money, and may result in engine damage. Every vehicle manufacturer strongly recommends against use of these materials. There is only one recommended and approved repair strategy when it comes to oil leaks: fix the leak.

You can only add the manufacturer specified amount of oil to an engine. If you add too much oil, or too little oil, that will cause engine damage. You should check the engine oil dipstick to determine if there is presently too much oil in the engine. If there is too much, the excess will have to be removed to prevent engine damage.

The leak that you are referring to can be repaired if you request an oil leak diagnostic. If you have further questions or concerns as you decide what to do, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic because we want you to make the most of your repair dollars and help you get the best possible results.

Are these oil leak problems related?
ANSWER : If the oil filter housing is integral to the oil cooler, or the housing had to be removed to service the cooler, a professional mechanic with knowledge of the limited service life of rubber seals would have absolutely (guaranteed) replaced the filter housing gasket that you are now belatedly finding leaks. However, if the leaking gasket is in an assembly that was not touched, or is not part of the cooler, they might be on reasonable grounds to have not fooled with it. These cooler configurations vary (from Mercedes Benz model to model) so, having the advice I just gave, you can just simply ask them what configuration you have and go from there. The bottom line is, if indeed, the gasket that is presently leaking was "right in front of them" while they did the warranty work, it should have been replaced simply as a matter of course. Indeed, the weak link on modern engines has become gaskets and seals. The engine will mechanically far outlast the gasket and seals but the problem is to replace all of them (once they all leak) you have to literally take the engine out of the car and take it apart just to put all new seals in. Please let us know how we can help further on this issue.

lost all oil pressure, replaced the oil pump, low oil sensor, oil pressure sensor, oil pan gasket,
ANSWER : The fuel pump will not stay on if you loose oil pressure. This is why it is shutting off. The loss of oil pressure may be from bad crankshaft bearings or camshaft bearings. The engine oil pan should be removed and the oil pump needs to be checked to ensure that you put in the pick up tube seal to the pump and connected the pump to the block. Then remove at least one main bearing cap and inspect the bearings for excessive wear and crankshaft damage. If you need some help with this, consider YourMechanic, as a certified technician can help diagnose the issue with your oil pressure firsthand and help you fix it accordingly.

Just noticed a huge oil leak trailing my car. It seems to be coming from below the engine. I recently had my oil changed a month
ANSWER : You might have a problem with the oil filter leaking when you rev the engine and increase the oil pressure. This can be from a collapsed oil filter media or excessive oil pressure from the engine. I recommend having the oil and filter replaced using a good quality filter and have the oil leak verified to be from the filter. Make sure to not run the engine low on oil. If you are finding you do not want to drive with the leak, a mobile technician from YourMechanic can come to your home or office, and replace both your filter, and oil.

A mechanic at sears auto center told me I had a oil pan leak. But i have not seen any oil leak from under my car. He recommende
ANSWER : Oil leaks should be repaired because leaking oil can damage external engine components such as rubber motor mounts. If you want the source of the oil leak identified and the repair estimated, simply request an oil leak diagnostic. Your vehicle has an engine oil maintenance reminder system to let you know when it’s time to change the engine oil and filter. The allowed interval for oil changes depends on your unique driving habits and can be up to, but not more than, one year. If you haven’t driven the vehicle a lot, don’t needlessly worry about having gone perhaps 2-3 years without the required oil change. It is critical though, at this juncture, to change the oil and filter immediately. Synthetic oil is recommended. If you desire that this maintenance be performed by a certified Mechanic, dispatched by YourMechanic right to your location, please request an engine oil/filter change and the responding mechanic will get this resolved for you. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic.

Oil is geting into intake manifold and into all intake vavles.
ANSWER : Hi there. That type of oil volume inside the intake manifold is typically a sure fire indication of a blown head gasket. It’s also quite possible that this has occurred for an extended period of time. There are a few things that you can do to verify that this is the head gasket. First, check the oil itself. If it is milky or foamy then it means the head gasket is damaged and coolant is leaking into the oil galleys. If the head gasket is not damaged, excessive oil inside the spark plug well could also be a damaged O-ring but can also be the result of a failing piston or worn valve guides. Either way, the only way to correctly inspect and diagnose this would be to tear down the motor, so you might want to consider whether you are wanting to complete repairs or purchase a newer vehicle.