ignition control module keeps failing

The car starts 2-3 times, I dont drive it I just start it. Then the ICM (ignition control module) splits at the bottom and won't give me spark no more.

My car has 200000 miles.
My car has a manual transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
This could be either the ignition control module or the ECM which gives direction to the ignition control module. I would start by checking the power supply to the ignition control module to see if it is receiving any power or signal from the ECM. If so, the you know the ignition control module is bad. If it is not, then you know the ECM is faulty. I would suggest having an expert from YourMechanic come to your home to diagnose and repair.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

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One of the first symptoms of a problem with the ignition module are engine performance issues. If the ignition module fails or has any problems it can lead to performance issues with the vehicle, such as misfires, hesitation, loss of power, and even reduced fuel economy.
These could include overheating caused by internal short circuits, vibration, low battery power, defective ignition cables and mechanical damage, to name a few. There are many signs that there is a fault with the Ignition Coil, including: No combustion: No combustion occurs because no spark is emitted.
Primary current is turned on and off by the action of the armature as it revolves past the pickup coil or sensor. As each tooth of the armature nears the pickup coil, it creates a voltage that signals the electronic module to turn off the coil primary current.
A bad ECM may lead to a vehicle that won`t or is difficult to start. If the ECM fails completely, it will leave the vehicle without engine management control, and will not start or run as a result. The engine may still crank, but it will not be able to start without the vital inputs from the computer.
To check if the ignition module is getting voltage, set the multimeter to AC voltage (VAC) reading and check for voltage at the thermostat input or 24VAC input to the Ignition Control Module. You should get a reading of 24VAC with respect to common or ground.
The ignition control module is usually mounted on the top of the engine and is heavily insulated to protect it from the heat. When the engine turns on, the engine control unit (ECU) sends a signal to the ignition control module. The ignition control module then continues to interact with the ECU signals.
Make Sure the Gas is On

Therefore, the first step in diagnosing ignition failure is to make sure the gas is turned on. If your furnace starts after the fuel source is turned on, you`ve solved your problem.

A great starting point when troubleshooting issues with the ignition system is the spark plug wires or coil boots. Visually inspect these for any cracks, brittleness, or burn marks that would indicate a faulty component.
the ignition module uses input from the crankshaft position sensor or camshaft position sensor to determine when to fire the spark plugs. this is referred to as the vehicle`s base ignition timing. on most vehicles built within the last few decades, the sensor`s signal is sent first to the ecm.
Typical issues that you will encounter when troubleshooting the ignition system include a dead battery, faulty spark plugs, ignition coils, or distributor. Ignition troubleshooting involves a series of tests and inspections to determine the root cause of the issue and take corrective actions to fix the problem.
The electronic components inside an engine control modules are fairly robust, but sometimes things can and do go wrong. Shorts in sensor circuits may overload and damage the module. Problems with the module`s power supply (too much voltage or not enough) or ground connections can cause it to misbehave.
Ignition Control Modules fail when they overheat. The most common symptom of failure is a no-start. A failing module may give other symptoms, such as engine stuttering and stalling, before it stops working.
For decades, all the car part information a person could find would recommend the replacement intervals for ignition system components, usually at the 30-, 60-, or 90,000-mile (48,280-, 96,561-, or 144,841-kilometer) tune-ups.
Average lifetime of ignition coil is around 100,000 miles or more. It is not an easy worn out replacement car part but still could fail for variety of reasons. #1. Coil insulation worn out due to aging.
For decades, all the car part information a person could find would recommend the replacement intervals for ignition system components, usually at the 30-, 60-, or 90,000-mile (48,280-, 96,561-, or 144,841-kilometer) tune-ups.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

transmission control module failing. We just replaced the computer module (pcm) 4 days ago?
ANSWER : The P0700 trouble code is a code for transmission control module (TCM) failure. Without knowing the other codes, it will not be possible to give you an accurate answer; it all depends on the other codes:

If you get a P0755 code, you may have a transmission solenoid pack issue.
P0725 indicates a likely crank position sensor issue.

I would suggest having your Check Engine Light diagnosed by a qualified mechanic.

ABS, ESP, EBR malfunction
ANSWER : You’re getting into an area that is kind of a dark art when you’re getting these kinds of codes. While I don’t know any of the symptoms that the car is exhibiting, I can tell you that failure in one of the control units can lead to codes showing up in the others and the ABS, ESP is a likely culprit since it interprets the wheel speed signals and sends the information to the other modules. You’re right that the module has to be coded, and I don’t think that Snap On has the software for that so the only place to go is the Star Diagnostic. (The consumer version of the Mercedes SDS ) You can Contact YourMechanic and see if anyone in your area has the appropriate equipment for this. Otherwise, this may be a case that would best be consigned to the Mercedes Dealer.

ignition control module keeps failing
ANSWER : This could be either the ignition control module or the ECM which gives direction to the ignition control module. I would start by checking the power supply to the ignition control module to see if it is receiving any power or signal from the ECM. If so, the you know the ignition control module is bad. If it is not, then you know the ECM is faulty. I would suggest having an expert from YourMechanic come to your home to diagnose and repair.

Engine control modules replaced on a newer car
ANSWER : Hi there. These modules are common failures on the Jaguar XF. I am sure that this does not make you feel any better about it, but from my experience, once the modules are replaced you usually do not have any further issues, assuming that new factory modules were used. Many times these modules fail due to voltage issues in the electrical system, so it is important to always make sure that the battery and alternator are good and that all do the ground connections are clean and tight. Your car should be fine for now, but if it begins to have drivability issues, you may want to start looking to sell the car.

I bought an ignition control module and no one seems to know where it goes. Is it in the distributor fuse box or computer or where
ANSWER : It is in the distributor. Remove the distributor cap, remove the rotor. There are two connectors on the outside, and one on the inside. Be very careful with the one on the inside, it tends to be brittle. Two screws retain the module. Make sure to apply the supplied grease to the bottom of the module.

If you run into any issues, consider YourMechanic, as a certified technician can come to the vehicles location and assist you with the necessary repairs. Best of luck.

Have a 3.8 and I changed the spark control module and the code keeps coming up 1993 Pontiac Bonneville
ANSWER : Hello – regarding your ignition system problem – it sounds like replacing the spark control module wasn’t the correct "fix". Without knowing what problem code was set, it’s hard to know what the correct response should be. If you can provide the problem code, and more description of any symptoms, that would help us provide guidance for repair. Otherwise, I would recommend a Check Engine service by a mobile, professional mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, who will come to your location, diagnose this problem, give you an accurate assessment of damage and cost estimate for repairs. Regarding the "Security" warning – your car uses a raised "chip" key, which embeds an electronic chip in the physical key. A key reader in the ignition key lock tumbler reads the key, and allows the car to be started. You will likely need to replace the ignition switch key tumbler (where the key reader is located) and the keys to resolve this problem. Unfortunately, this is not a service YourMechanic offers at this time.

I’ve had the fuel pump replaced, distributor cap & rotor, ignition control module & crank sensor. Truck still won’t start. The
ANSWER : Hi there. Has the battery been tested? Have the battery tested with a digital tester that provides current voltage, cold cranking amps, and state of health. A bad cell in the battery can wreak havoc on the electrical system and have technicians chasing ghosts. If the battery tests ok, that is a good thing as it does not need to be replaced. There is a basic acronym I use for no start conditions: FAST (Fuel, Air, Spark, Timing). These are the basic things that every engine has to have to run. After checking these the diagnosis can move forward. A capable scan tool may provide data that can assist in the diagnosis as well. I suggest having a qualified technician perform an inspection to avoid replacing any more unnecessary parts. Your Mechanic has several available technicians that can assist you with a car does not start inspection.

What should i check before replacing the ABS module
ANSWER : Hello There,
It sounds like you may have some faulty wheel speed sensors that may be causing the ABS light to come on. Your car is equipped with wheel speed sensors at each of the four wheels which monitor wheel speed while relaying this information constantly to the ABS and traction control system which are controlled by the car’s ECU. When the ECU senses an abnormal speed given specific conditions, it engages the ABS or traction control as needed to control the vehicle properly and safely. Occasionally, these sensors can fail or become faulty working intermittently sending inaccurate signals to the ECU. The ABS or traction control system may be inadvertently activated by these false or inaccurate signals. I would suggest having a professional from Your Mechanic come to your home to diagnose your ABS and traction control system.