I think the guide rails were bad and it just quit. Loss power while traveling.

I was told that my guide rails were the reason my engine was making noise. While driving it loss power and will not start now. Did i damage entire engine or can timing be fixed?

My car has 250000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hello. To confirm your previously given advice, yes, your engine does have long-term timing chain guide maintenance requirements. The early noise you heard was the timing chain having worn through the plastic guides, and possibly the chain "slapping" due to a weak tensioner or stretched chain. The sudden loss of power is alarming since that is likely due to a failed chain, or the chain jumping one or more teeth or "jumping time".

This causes the loss of power you mention, and potentially fatal damage to your engine with internal piston-to-valve collisions possible. To have this checked, I recommend having a qualified professional from YourMechanic diagnose the loss of power issue in person so that this can be corrected.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced mechanics :

A broken timing chain will cause an engine to not start or fail while driving. If the belt is already broken, the engine won`t have enough compression to start. If it breaks or jumps while driving, the pistons will be damaged from contact with the valves. The valves themselves will bend and potentially ruin the engine.
Here are the causes of timing chain problems: Wrong oil: Using the wrong engine oil in your BMW can cause various problems. However, the timing chain is one of the major parts that will be affected. It will likely wear out faster if you use the wrong oil.
This motor known as the N20 between the 2012 and 2015 years has issues where the timing chain rattles and breaks pieces off its guides before it completely fails. These pieces fall into the oil pan where they are commonly sucked into the oil pick-up system and partially or fully block the oil passages.
When any changes are made to the engine of a car, the ignition timing is adjusted accordingly. If not, you could experience several problems with your engine with improper ignition timing like knocking, hard to start, increase fuel usage, overheating, and reduced power.
Chain failure can result in anything from a replacement chain kit, to substantial damage to the top of the engine – cylinder head, camshafts, valves and rockers. When replacing the timing chain, there are other items that should be replaced as a matter of course.
A malfunctioning timing chain can cause the engine to misfire, run poorly, or even seize up, leading to catastrophic engine failure. As such, it is crucial to ensure that the timing chain is regularly inspected and that any issues are addressed promptly to prevent costly repairs and potential damage to the engine.
Replacement Guidelines

BMW and MINI use Timing Chains in almost every model of engine that they produce.It is recommended to replace your timing chain before failure as repair prices can become very high from internal engine damage. From experience the life of these timing chains are 90,000 miles or 9 years.

Engine Fails While Driving

If the timing chain breaks while the engine is running, the engine will stop immediately and will likely bend valves and damage the pistons. The timing chain can also flail around inside engines and the loose ends may cause additional damage.

The average cost for a Timing Chain Tensioner Replacement is between $721 and $872 but can vary from car to car.
Driving with a bad timing chain could give you serious engine damage, and it`s also dangerous because it could cause your vehicle to stop suddenly without warning. A timing chain typically requires replacement anywhere from 40,000 to 150,000 miles.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

I think the guide rails were bad and it just quit. Loss power while traveling.
ANSWER : Hello. To confirm your previously given advice, yes, your engine does have long-term timing chain guide maintenance requirements. The early noise you heard was the timing chain having worn through the plastic guides, and possibly the chain "slapping" due to a weak tensioner or stretched chain. The sudden loss of power is alarming since that is likely due to a failed chain, or the chain jumping one or more teeth or "jumping time".

This causes the loss of power you mention, and potentially fatal damage to your engine with internal piston-to-valve collisions possible. To have this checked, I recommend having a qualified professional from YourMechanic diagnose the loss of power issue in person so that this can be corrected.

I have a bad oxygen sensor, bad power steering sensor, and a bad cam shaft sensor? Should I replace any of them?
ANSWER : When you say you have three bad sensors I can only assume you have had them tested and the end result is three bad sensors. If they tested bad then they should be replaced. The power steering sensor senses the load of the steering on the engine so it can raise the idle during parking maneuvers. The O2 sensor is used for fuel control and it may effect engine power and fuel mileage. The camshaft sensor cay cause no starts, engine running problems and all three will turn on the check engine light.

I have loss of power after 30mph, hard to shift.
ANSWER : Hi there. It is very possible that the minor exhaust leak has grown into being the primary cause of your acceleration issue. The exhaust system is engineered to efficiently expel exhaust gases from the combustion chamber through the exhaust system and out the tail pipe. This creates compression and when there is a leak, the internal engine’s combustion is significantly impacted; which can cause these issues. However, there are other fuel or ignition system components that impact acceleration as well as transmission problems as well. It might be a good idea to have a professional mechanic complete a car is slow to accelerate inspection at your location; so they can determine what repairs would be needed to resolve this problem.

power steering fluid is leaking
ANSWER : With a power steering fluid leak that big, you certainly should have the vehicle inspected as soon as possible to find the exact cause. Any of the components you listed can be the source of the leak. The power steering pump as well as the rack & pinion steering unit rely on the fluid for lubrication as well as cooling. The whining you hear is from the pump when the fluid runs low or empty. Your issue can be caused by something as simple as a fluid hose right now, but continued ’running dry" of the power steering fluid, can result in damage to both the pump and the rack & pinion unit. If that happens, you can take what may be a repair of a few hundred dollars and turn it into a repair of a couple of thousand dollars.

Loss of power few minutes after starting the car.
ANSWER : Hi there. Actually, the OBD-II error code you listed, P0233, is a generic OBD-II code that is triggered when the engine control module (ECM) detects that the secondary circuit to the fuel pump has an intermittent voltage when the fuel pump relay is turned on. The fuel pump secondary circuit powers the fuel pump and can cause a no start or the engine to suddenly stall while driving, which might be the source of the stalling issue you’re experiencing.

Sputtering and lack of power when accelerating
ANSWER : Whenever your Check Engine Light is on and a code is set, the ECU resorts to base settings and mapping just to make sure the vehicle runs, but not necessarily the to help the car run well. In this case, it looks like the ECU is not compensating for fuel quality, temperature, barometric pressure, etc.

When it comes to O2 sensors, the ECU uses them to read the amount of oxygen, burnt fuel, etc, in the exhaust and adjusts air/fuel mixture accordingly. If that bank 2 sensor 1 is bad, you can definitely feel a loss of power, hesitation, and poor economy. Check for any intake/vacuum leaks. If none are found, then replacing that O2 sensor and clearing codes should be your answer. If you want to have the loss of power issue diagnosed, a certified mechanic from YourMechanic can come to your car’s home or office to pinpoint the fault and recommend the right repair.

My odyssey has 220k miles and needs all new motor mounts, has a power steering pump leak, valve cover gaskets leaking badly, power
ANSWER : Hi, I will be glad to help you with this. The services that you are writing in about are all offered by YourMechanic. You can obtain a written quote, and schedule the repairs to suit your needs, by simply visiting YourMechanic’s Services Page. Once on the Services page, please click on any service that you desire, then click on "Get a Quote" and enter your vehicle information (year, make, model). So, for example, if you desire motor mount replacement, you would first click on Motor Mount Replacement from YourMechanic’s Services Page. Then, once you land on the referred page for motor mounts, just click on "Get a quote". Follow the same procedure for each desired service that you select from YourMechanic’s Services Page. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

Loss of power using turbo
ANSWER : It sounds like the vehicle is going into limp mode. This occurs when the powertrain control module (PCM) (also known as the electrical control unit) has determined there is an overboost condition. The computer disables the turbo to prevent damage from occurring. There are many potential causes for an overboost condition, with a failed turbo being just one of them.

Some other possibilities include vacuum leaks, a faulty vane adjustment solenoid, faulty turbo actuator or a bad MAF sensor. There is a technical service bulletin (TSB) # 21-07-65, which advises to check for vacuum leaks before replacing the turbo.

If you would like a second opinion from the dealer, I suggest you give the team at YourMechanic a call to inspect your loss of power condition.