I had 2 tires put on the front of the car and now on the passenger side I hear a popping or knocking sound coming from there, I al

I had 2 tires put on the front of the car and now on the passenger side I hear a popping or knocking sound coming from there, I have already replaced the lower control arm.

My car has 132000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hello, thank you for writing in. It is impossible to tell what the issue is without doing some further testing. New tires can absolutely put added stress on already worn down components, or they can cause new issues if not installed correctly. Often tires shops skip details like torquing down your lug nuts and properly balancing your tires. You want to make sure that both of these were done correctly, and that the tires are properly inflated. From there you will want to test the suspension, and then lift the vehicle to continue testing. You can then manipulate the wheel to find out what is making the noise. For more help with this process and repairs, contact our service department to schedule an appointment.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

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If your tires are worn down, you`ll hear a clicking noise every time you turn. You can usually tell if your tires are worn down by checking the tread depth. If the tread depth is less than 2/32 inch, then the tires need to be replaced.
Popping Turns

Popping and clicking noises may also seem to come from one or both of the front wheels. Generally, this type of popping will stop when you start driving straight again. The noise most likely indicates that you have a damaged constant velocity, or CV, joint in the front axle.

Clicking or popping sounds that come from the wheels could result from any the following components: Damaged constant velocity joint. Worn or damaged struts. Loosely or broken hubcaps.
As the damage worsens, a faulty CV can produce a loud click, popping, or clunk sound. When making a tight turn at a low rate, frequent brake noise at low speed (caused by damage to the outer CV joints) causes grinding noises. A bad CV joint also causes a vibration in the steering wheel and the car`s floorboard.
A CV axle can typically be expected to last for 80,000 to 100,000 miles under normal driving conditions. You`ll know when the axle is about to fail when you begin to hear a loud, rhythmic clicking noise coming from the front wheel as you turn. That noise is due to a lack of lubricant in one of the CV joints.
A popping or clicking noise when turning is a classic symptom of a bad outer CV joint. If the boot is torn or leaking, it should be replaced regardless of the condition of the joint. If the CV joint is noisy, get that thing out of there! it needs to be replaced.
A clicking sound that happens mainly when you drive slowly, particularly when you are braking, could be a sign of a loose brake pad. If the pad is not properly secured to the caliper, it moves around at slower speeds and makes a clicking sound when you apply the brakes.
If you are hearing a clicking sound, it`s possible there is an issue with the starter system. There can be a faulty battery or alternator, so jump-start the battery with help from a friend or neighbor. If your battery dies shortly after, then you might have a problem with your alternator.
If you`re hearing a clicking noise when you turn the wheel, it could be an indication that your cv axle shaft is going bad. The clicking noise is caused by the CV joint at the end of the cv axle shaft.
A CV axle can typically be expected to last for 80,000 to 100,000 miles under normal driving conditions. You`ll know when the axle is about to fail when you begin to hear a loud, rhythmic clicking noise coming from the front wheel as you turn. That noise is due to a lack of lubricant in one of the CV joints.
A loud clicking noise when turning left or right can usually be attributed to a faulty CV joint. Your car`s CV joints are covered with grease and enclosed in protective boots. If this boot breaks, grease will leak out and the CV joint will become unlubricated.
Here are a few other sounds and symptoms of bad wheel hub bearings: Snapping or clicking noises. This is sometimes also caused by a damaged CV joint, but can also be due to worn wheel bearings if you hear a clicking noise when turning. Humming or growling noises.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

I had 2 tires put on the front of the car and now on the passenger side I hear a popping or knocking sound coming from there, I al
ANSWER : Hello, thank you for writing in. It is impossible to tell what the issue is without doing some further testing. New tires can absolutely put added stress on already worn down components, or they can cause new issues if not installed correctly. Often tires shops skip details like torquing down your lug nuts and properly balancing your tires. You want to make sure that both of these were done correctly, and that the tires are properly inflated. From there you will want to test the suspension, and then lift the vehicle to continue testing. You can then manipulate the wheel to find out what is making the noise. For more help with this process and repairs, contact our service department to schedule an appointment.

Strong knocking from front driver’s side and passenger side when making turns left OR right.
ANSWER : The steering rack and pinion assembly is mounted in rubber bushings; they may be deteriorated and allowing the rack and pinion to contact the sub frame making the knocking noise.

The other component to look at is the struts upper bearing and rubber bushing. These get dry of lubricant and should be lubed with a teflon grease when installed so the rubber will not get damaged.

Have someone feel the top of the strut mount under the hood while the steering is turned back and forth to see if the knocking or popping is in the strut. The rack and pinion bushings should be inspected from under the vehicle.

If either or both are bad then they will need to be replaced.

A mobile mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, can come to your home or business to inspect the knocking noise at your home or business.

Just put on new brakes and replaced driver side tire. Now there’s a knocking sound when I accelerate or turn right (which intensif
ANSWER : Hi there. If you replaced only one tire, this could be an interior wheel weight hitting against the brake caliper. It could also be an issue with a steering stabilizer bar bushing, CV joint or other suspension component. It might be a great idea to have one of our professional mobile mechanics come to your location to complete a car is making a noise inspection, so they can isolate the root source of this noise and recommend repairs that will resolve the issue.

A loose sound coming from my front left side tire.
ANSWER : What you are describing sounds like a failing CV joint. Depending on which side is worn, you may hear the noise more pronounced from the side that is affected by this. A CV (Constant Velocity) joint is a shaft that connects the transmission to the wheels, essentially transferring the power from the drive train directly to the wheels. The CV joint is packed with a special grease and sealed tight with the rubber or plastic boot, that is held in place with two clamps. The most common problem with the CV joints is when the protective boot cracks or gets damaged. Once this happens, the grease comes out and moisture and dirt get in, causing the CV joint to wear faster and eventually fail due to lack of lubrication and corrosion. When the CV joint becomes damaged or worn, you may hear a clicking, clunking or popping sound coming from this area as the weight of the vehicle puts pressure on this area and shifts back and forth and side to side. I would recommend having an expert from YourMechanic come to your location to diagnose and inspect your vehicle.

Hearing a knocking/popping sound somewhere in the front of the car when driving.
ANSWER : There could be multiple issues causing the mystery sound you’re hearing on your 2005 Mazda. My first inclination would be to check the steering stabilizer bar bushings, but if those were replaced, it could be an issue with your wheel bearings. In many cases, when wheel bearings are starting to wear out, they will cause a clunking or grinding sound to occur when you turn the wheel all the way to one side or the other. If you need further help with this, I recommend having a qualified professional from YourMechanic diagnose the noise and assist with repair.

I hear a loud clicking noise on the drivers side by my tire rim when turning the steering wheel front tires vibrating as well.
ANSWER : A clicking noise on turning is very characteristic of a failed outboard CV axle joint. Sometimes, in such a circumstance, you can see that the rubber outboard boot is actually torn and leaking grease. If you see that (look behind the wheel toward the axle end), the axle for sure will have to be serviced. If you change the axle, be sure to install a new rubber seal on the transmission output side so that you do not have transmission fluid leaks with the new axle (a common mistake is to overlook that seal; if an old, left-in-place seal leaks after the axle is put in the job has to be done all over again). Vibration without actual shaking of the steering wheel "might" be related to the axle issue. On the other hand, such vibration could also be due to a failed wheel bearing, especially with over 200,000 miles on the vehicle and if those are the original bearings. If you were to need both an axle and a wheel bearing at the same time, and on the same side, that’s actually not that bad because the steering knuckle that holds the wheel bearing has to come off anyway to replace the axle. But, backing up here, the very first thing to do is get the issue properly diagnosed so you spend the minimum possible. If you want to obtain a diagnostic, please request a vehicle CV/wheel bearing noise inspection and the responding certified mechanic will get this taken care of for you. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

I keep hearing a popping/clunking sound on the right front passenger side of my truck near the right tire.
ANSWER : The sound might be related to a worn suspension component. From what you are describing, it should be fairly easy to pin down with static testing (e.g., ball joints should only move "so much" during a test). To pinpoint the exact part, though, will require an on-site inspection. If you request a vehicle noise diagnostic, the responding certified mechanic will definitely find the origin of the noise. There are many, many components in the suspension that could account for the noise, some are not expensive to repair and all can be repaired right at your location. Thus, I encourage you to seek out the diagnostic and then with the mechanic’s advice and explanation, you can decide how best to handle it. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

I hear a whooshing sound when I turn the steering wheel. If I make a sharp turn, I hear a grinding sound coming from the back. ???
ANSWER : Hi there. In most cases, the rear knocking sound is caused by the driveshaft, drive axles, differential gears, transmission mount, or the rear struts. The sound you’re experiencing is very difficult to diagnose, but could be caused by the power steering shaft, or you power steering system being low on fluid. It might be a good idea to have a professional mechanic complete a car is making a noise inspection.