How often should my tires be rotated?

How often should my tires be rotated?
Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Since tires are such an important part of your driving experience, it is crucial that you have the rotated whenever they are scheduled for maintenance. To tell how often your tires should be rotated.

Follow the recommended service schedule for tire rotations.
Have the dealer rotate the tires when signs of tire wear begin to show to lengthen life of the tires.

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How Often Should You Get a Tire Rotation? A good rule of thumb is every 5,000 miles. Depending on your vehicle, driving style, and tire type, you may need to rotate your tires more or less often.
With front-wheel drive, move front tires to the back of the car in the same left/right position, and switch sides when moving the rear tires forward. With rear-wheel drive, do the opposite, keeping the rear tires in the same left/right position when moving them forward and switching the front tires in the rear.
Tire rotation is an extremely important component of car and truck maintenance. Rotating tires ensures that all four tires wear down evenly. There are many reasons why this is important. Tires that wear down unevenly may affect the way the vehicle handles and be dangerous in off-road conditions.
Vehicle vibration- If your car starts to vibrate at higher speeds, starting at 45 mph, your tires may be out of rotation or unbalanced. If you feel the vibration all over, your tires need to be rotated. However, if you feel it in the steering wheel, floorboard or seat, your tires need to be balanced.
Tire rotation means periodically changing the position of each of the tires on your vehicle. You should rotate your tires as recommended by the vehicle manufacturer, or every 5,000 miles.
During rotation, each tire and wheel is removed from your vehicle and moved to a different position to ensure that all tires wear evenly and last longer. Tires should be rotated every six months or 6,000 to 8,000 miles.
The front right tire will be moved to the left rear, the front life tire will be moved to the right rear, and the two rear tires move to the front without switching sides.
They must always be rotated front to rear — no matter the vehicle they are installed on — so the direction of the rotation does not change. Watch our Tread Life video to see more rotation patterns.
Most manufacturers typically recommend rotating your tires every 5,000-10,000 miles, or at the same time as your regularly scheduled oil changes.
Rotating too often or in the wrong pattern can also lead to uneven wear and potentially compromise your vehicle`s safety and performance. So, while regular rotation is key, be sure to stick to the recommended schedule to keep your tires in top condition.
Refer to your owner`s manual or consult with your local auto care experts to understand how often you should rotate your tires. Most vehicle manufacturers recommend that you get your tires rotated about every 7,500 miles or six months.
Since directional tires are manufactured to be facing one direction only, they can`t be rotated like symmetrical or asymmetrical tires.
Rearward Cross is the best rotation pattern for vehicles with rear-wheel or four-wheel drive where braking and steering are controlled by the rear or both axles. This is essentially the opposite of the forward cross pattern.
The rearward cross rotation pattern is recommended for RWD and 4WD vehicles. This rotation pattern is the opposite of the forward cross but instead, you bring the front tires to the rear and the rear tires to the front.
Failure to rotate your tires can lead to hydroplaning. This occurs when tires lose their grip on the pavement and skid on top of the water, putting the driver in danger of uncontrollably sliding off the road. Losing control of your vehicle puts you and any passengers at considerable risk.
Refer to your owner`s manual or consult with your local auto care experts to understand how often you should rotate your tires. Most vehicle manufacturers recommend that you get your tires rotated about every 7,500 miles or six months.
Unless you drive fewer than about 7,500 miles per year, it`s a good idea to rotate tires every six months or so to prevent uneven wear. The tires mounted on the drive wheels of any vehicle perform extra duty because they apply the power to the pavement.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Noise from front end after a tire rotation. It sounds like four clacks and happens once each time the wheels make a full rotation.
ANSWER : Hi there. The noise is coming from the lug nuts. Check all of the lug nuts and make sure that they are tight. If the lug nuts are tight, then look at the center of the wheel and make sure that it is aligning up with the hub on the axle. Make sure that the wheel is not out of round causing the wheel to move a little causing the sound. If you need further assistance with your front tires, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

Inside edge of tires wearing out too fast
ANSWER : There is a technical bulletin from the manufacture to check the alignment camber, and if the camber is out of specification, replace the right rear lower control arm to correct the alignment. As far as the other tires, you should have the complete system alignment checked, and if out of adjustment then the suspension checked for damage or worn out parts. Your camber is out of adjustment if it is wearing on the inside or outside of the tires. Make sure you get the alignment done at a place that has a state of the art newer machine, and not some old machine that may make things worse than they are now. Alignments need to be very precise to keep the tires from abnormal wear.

Car pulls to the right after tire rotation
ANSWER : Hello. On your 2002 Mercedes Benz SLK320, all of the tires have to have the same tread design an the same amount of tread. Any variations will cause the computer to not read the sensors correctly which will cause these issues. You need to purchase two more tires that are the same as the new ones, and install the tires to replace the other two tires. If you want to have this looked at before replacing the tires, a local expert from YourMechanic can come to your car’s location to diagnose your car’s pulling issue.

Thudding noise after tire rotation
ANSWER : Hello there. Without knowing what kind of weather and snow the area you live in sees, I will answer this as best as possible. In most places in the country, all-season tires can be used (as the name implies) during all seasons and in light snow without any issues. In places where heavy snow and adverse weather conditions are present, snow tires are often used. Snow tires can even be used with chains or studs if the weather is bad enough. There is no one solution and it depends on where you live. If you use snow tires after winter, the tires must be switched back to an all season tire or summer tire to not wear the snow tires rapidly.

Can I replace my 225/45R18 tires with 215/55R17 tires? The 215’s are what ALL tire sites say are original factory size
ANSWER : I owned a 2008 Sonata and currently own a 2015 Sonata Sport 2.0T Limited. With your generation as well as my 2015, the Sonata with the 2.0T engine has larger brakes so the 18 inch wheels make more room for them. Since yours is a 2.4 Limited, it only has the 18 inch wheels for appearance as all 2.4 ltr versions whether Base or Limited, have the same size brakes. I do not recommend a 215mm section width with the 18 inch wheels. The ride and handling will deteriorate badly. If you are sticking with the 18 inch wheels, then stick with the 225/45R18 tires. You can most certainly change down to the 215/55R17 tires AND wheels. Any 17 inch wheels listed for the Base, SE, GLS, etc will fit fine. The ride and handling will be different. It will ride a bit smoother as you are increasing the sidewall aspect ratio – 55 vs 45%. The will also be narrower – 215mm vs 225 mm. It may not grip as well in dry weather but you may notice a little better traction in wet and snowy conditions as there will be more weight concentrated on a narrower tread area. Your speedometer may be slightly off however. The average overall diameter of a 225/45R18 tire is 25.9 inches. So that makes for roughly 802 revolutions per mile. The 215/55R17 will have an average diameter of 26.3 inches and approximately 790 revolutions per mile. A slight difference that may only cause your speedometer to be off by 1-2 mph. On the up side, you may get a slight bump in miles per gallon. The taller tire will reduce engine rpms at highway speeds slightly. So if you are willing to reduce the wheels from 18 inch to 17 inch, then go ahead with the 215/55R17 tires. If you are keeping the 18 inch wheels, then stick with the 225/45R18 tires.

Advice for winter tires
ANSWER : 205/55R17 may be too tall for your vehicle. A couple of good sources to check size compatibility for your vehicle would be tirerack.com or maybe discounttire.com. Sites like Tire Rack specialize in winter tire packages and is a good source for fitment options. I have personally used Bridgestone and Dunlop snow tires and would recommend either. However, it is highly recommended that winter tires be mounted at all 4 corners. Having different tires with different capabilities not only makes the vehicle unstable, it will effect systems like the anti-lock brakes and traction control. Winter tires perform much better than summer or all-season tires do in ice and snow conditions. Having two tires with good winter traction and two with poor traction will have the anti-lock brake system working overtime. Also, sticking with a smaller tire for winter use is advisable. For ice and snow driving, you want the opposite for summer driving. Wide, low profile tires improve warm, dry weather driving. Tall, narrow, tires provide better control on snow and ice. Consider keeping your stock 16 inch wheels for winter use with winter tires mounted on them and maybe a nice set of 17 inch wheels and tires for summer use. I’ve done that with nearly every vehicle I’ve owned whether front, rear, or all-wheel drive.

my husband rotated my tires yesterday, today my steering wheel shakes
ANSWER : Hello. This could be a variety of potential issues. First, I would suggest checking the tire pressure in all four tires to be sure they all have the proper air pressure as on tire that may be out of balance for any reason may cause the shaking you describe. Also, I would recommend having the tires balanced and alignment on the car checked as a car that is out of alignment may also cause this type of shaking. If you are still stumped with the problem, a local professional from YourMechanic, can inspect the shaking issue and pinpoint the correct fixes or adjustments that are needed.

After tire rotation thumping noise developed – 2006 Chevrolet Avalanche 2500 Automatic
ANSWER : The "thumping" sound you mention seems more like the torque convertor lock-up clutch in the transmission failing. It tries to lock up, can’t recycles, etc. GM has a service bulletin on this problem – TSB Reference #3438A. Discuss this with your Chevrolet dealer. Camber wear will indeed cause abnormal tire wear. The only solution is to have an alignment done to specs for your truck.