How do I know which O2 sensor to change when it sets a code for o2 sensor? 2000 Jaguar S-type

The code is showing that it's running too lean and if you sit at a red light in drive for too long it stalls
My car's transmission is unknown to me.
Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hi – the description for each Check Engine problem code contains the clues : for a given code – P1647 for example – the description is "Bank 2, Sensor 1". This means the first sensor in the exhaust system – before the catalytic converter, on the side of the engine which does NOT contain cylinder #1. Bank 1 is the group of cylinders including cylinder 1. Sensor 2 is the O2 sensor after the catalytic converter. Send us your problem code, and we can tell you which O2 sensor is malfunctioning. Or, have an emissions system service by a mobile, professional mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, who will come to your location, diagnose this problem, give you an accurate assessment of damage and cost estimate for repairs.

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Depending on the engine design, vehicles can have multiple oxygen sensors, sometimes on both sides of the engine. Reading the trouble codes will tell you exactly which sensor is in need of replacing — either the upstream (top) or downstream (bottom) sensor — and on what bank (side) of the engine.
On all cars, bank 1 sensor 1 is an upstream oxygen sensor. You will find it on the exhaust side, closest to the bank 1 cylinder head. It is easy to spot in-line engines, while it is important to find out which is the bank 1 side on V-shaped engines.
Sensor 1 is the sensor closest to the engine. Sensor 2 is the downstream oxygen sensor. It is always going to be located after the catalytic converter. Its job is to monitor the oxygen content exiting the catalytic converter in order to determine if it is operating efficiently.
While best practice is for the array to contain a mix of sensors selected from differing lots, you should not mix brands or very old sensors with very new sensors.
Each oxygen sensor has its own unique characteristics specific to its application. One generic oxygen sensor that may appear to be the same cannot be used to replace a range of these specific oxygen sensors.
Three types of oxygen sensors, i.e., concentration cell (zirconia sensors), oxide semiconductor (TiO2 sensors) and electrochemical pumping oxygen sensors (limiting current sensors) are now available for control of the air—fuel ratio of engines.
Bank One is always the bank where cylinder number one is located. On the Corvette it will always be the driver side. Bank Two is the passenger side. Sensor 1 on Corvettes is always the sensor that is closest to the exhaust port of the engine.
The P0130 code is an OBD code that is triggered when the Engine Control Module (ECM) fails to detect any activity from the oxygen sensor that is located on the Bank 1 side of your motor and exhaust system.
P0136 is a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) for “O2 Sensor Circuit Malfunction (Bank 1, Sensor 2)”. This can happen for multiple reasons and a mechanic needs to diagnose the specific cause for this code to be triggered in your situation.
The oxygen or lambda sensor is one of the most important and one of the most misunderstood components of a modern fuel injection system.
Can I Drive My Car With A Bad Oxygen Sensor? We recommend against driving with a bad O2 sensor as the powertrain is not running on the correct fuel mixture. While it may perform fine in the beginning, if your engine is running rich and using too much fuel it might begin to clog the catalytic converter.
Overall, buying an OEM oxygen sensor is a better and safer investment than an aftermarket one. It is less likely to fail, designed to work on your vehicle specifically, and is backed by the manufacturer`s warranty.
The downstream sensor is a heated oxygen sensor and reads the emissions after the catalytic converter. They both function the same but are different enough that they cannot be swapped.
We always recommend buying OEM parts instead of aftermarket parts. They are a safer bet. But, we strongly recommend it to anyone looking for a replacement oxygen sensor. These sensors serve an important role in ensuring the smooth operation of your engine.
All types of sensors can be basically classified into analog sensors and digital sensors. But, there are a few types of sensors such as temperature sensors, IR sensors, ultrasonic sensors, pressure sensors, proximity sensors, and touch sensors are frequently used in most electronics applications.
The oxygen or lambda sensor is one of the most important and one of the most misunderstood components of a modern fuel injection system.
The downstream sensor is a heated oxygen sensor and reads the emissions after the catalytic converter. They both function the same but are different enough that they cannot be swapped.
Oxygen sensors are not among the maintenance items that need to be replaced regularly, such as oil and air filters, so they typically are replaced only when they fail.
Oxygen sensors are not among the maintenance items that need to be replaced regularly, such as oil and air filters, so they typically are replaced only when they fail.

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How do I know which O2 sensor to change when it sets a code for o2 sensor? 2000 Jaguar S-type
ANSWER : Hi – the description for each Check Engine problem code contains the clues : for a given code – P1647 for example – the description is "Bank 2, Sensor 1". This means the first sensor in the exhaust system – before the catalytic converter, on the side of the engine which does NOT contain cylinder #1. Bank 1 is the group of cylinders including cylinder 1. Sensor 2 is the O2 sensor after the catalytic converter. Send us your problem code, and we can tell you which O2 sensor is malfunctioning. Or, have an emissions system service by a mobile, professional mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, who will come to your location, diagnose this problem, give you an accurate assessment of damage and cost estimate for repairs.

O2 sensors changed, but check engine light still showing code after clearing it I checked fuse. Wires are good and used Denso OE.
ANSWER : Depending on what the code was for will determine if the oxygen sensor was to be replaced. If the conditions were for a rich or lean mixture and it said oxygen sensor, then the spark plugs and wires could need replaced if its a rich reading or the fuel injectors could be clogged or not working if its a lean mixture. If the code said that the oxygen sensor was bad, then check the harness and see if there is a break in the wiring or a short to ground in the wiring from the oxygen sensor to the main harness. If you need further assistance with your check engine light being on, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

check engine light O2 sensor already replaced same codes still popping up after replacing old O2 sensor
ANSWER : Hi there. What you received from the parts store was a code retrieval, not a diagnostic. The codes are set when a fault is detected against normal operating parameter. The computer does not know what caused the fault, only that the fault meets the criteria for this code to set. There could be a problem in the wire harness, converter, or the ECM. The code and data are needed to properly assess the direction that a diagnosis needs. I strongly suggest having a qualified technician perform an inspection to avoid replacing unnecessary parts. Your Mechanic has several available technicians that can assist you with a check engine light inspection.

Diagnostic code read o2 sensor bad, replaced o2 sensor, cleared code but engine light came back on, is it caused by bad air filter
ANSWER : Hello there. Typically jump starting a vehicle doesn’t trigger an OBD-II error code. However, one of the most common misdiagnosis issues with the P-2270 is replacing the O2 sensor before diagnosing if there are any exhaust leaks. Obviously, you’ll want to check for the exhaust leaks first, repair the damaged component, and then clear the codes before scanning the vehicle again. Sometimes the electrical harness attached to the O2 sensor is damaged or dirty which will also trigger this error code. The noise and vibration may be an indicator of a loose exhaust pipe, which may be the source of the error code staying on. If you need any help, have a technician from YourMechanic come to your home or office to diagnose your Check Engine Light and make the necessary repairs.

Service engine warning, MAF code and O2 sensor code, along with check suspension light are turned on
ANSWER : Hello, it sounds like you have quite a few things going on. I am going to do my best to break them down for you.

First if the engine is very loud when idling and the belt has already been replaced, there may be an issue with the tensioner or idler pulley.
Next, the Navigator is known for needing service to the air suspension system as it gets up in miles, the most common causes of these are the air struts themselves have failed, or one of the air lines has a leak.
Lastly, if the O2 sensor and MAF are continually coming back after the sensors have been replaced, the most common cause would be either an exhaust leak or a vacuum leak.

Qualified technicians such as the ones at YourMechanic will be able to diagnose these issues and recommend the best path to repair, starting with a diagnosis of your warning lights.

So I had two codes come up for two of my o2 sensors..replaced them both and check engine light is still on…my mechanic seems to
ANSWER : Hi there:

Although it’s hard to say if there was serious damage done to your ECM during this service, it’s more likely that the stored error codes were never cleared from the ECM, and that’s why the warning lights still appear. This is a common oversight with some mechanics, but if you have a mobile mechanic complete a check engine light inspection, they should be able to clear those stored codes and determine if further damage has occurred.

My code reader says I have a bad mass air flow sensor ans crank shat sensor test drive ran better shut off & engine Lt. Same code
ANSWER : Hi there. The problem you are describing, sounds like you may have a poor connection in the connector at the mass airflow sensor. Although, sometimes aftermarket parts do not perform as well as factory (OEM) parts. Check for corrosion and/or wide spacing in the terminal ends. Compare the terminal ends in the connector using a flashlight to see better. The terminals can be tightened. If you are not comfortable with doing that, a replacement pigtail (connector) is available. You vehicle may require further diagnosis performed with a scanner that provides parameters that can be viewed as the fault occurs. If that is the case, I recommend having your vehicle’s electrical circuits inspected in order to pinpoint the underlying fault.

It threw a code 21 , throttle position sensor bad code. i replaced it and the code went away but i still have no spark.
ANSWER : Hello and thank you for contacting YourMechanic. The problems that you are encountering with your vehicle, could be caused by the harness to the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) or the computer itself.

Check the harness to the TPS for any debris or any corrosion. Hook up a paperclip to the harness and turn on the key. Use a multimeter and check for voltage at the pins of the harness. Make sure that the ground on the sensor is grounded and has no resistance. If you find that the harness is having too much resistance, then I recommend having the main engine harness replaced. If you have replaced the harness and still have the same problems, then the computer will need to be flashed or replaced.

I recommend having a professional, like one from YourMechanic, come to your home to diagnose your car’s no start condition before replacing any parts.