Have noise coming from drivers front

Had struts replaced 2015. Have noise coming from drivers front side

My car has 73000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hi There,
Depending on the kind of noise, this could be a couple of different things. If it is more of a clicking or popping noise that is consistent with making turns, this may be a worn out CV axle joint. A CV (Constant Velocity) joint is a shaft that connects the transmission to the wheels, essentially transferring the power from the drive train directly to the wheels. The CV joint is packed with a special grease and sealed tight with the rubber or plastic boot, that is held in place with two clamps. The most common problem with the CV joints is when the protective boot cracks or gets damaged. Once this happens, the grease comes out and moisture and dirt get in, causing the CV joint to wear faster and eventually fail due to lack of lubrication and corrosion. When the CV joint becomes damaged or worn, you may hear a clicking, clunking or popping sound coming from this area as the weight of the vehicle puts pressure on this area and shifts back and forth and side to side.

If the sound is more of howling or groaning noise that is consistent with whee speed and more pronounced when turning, this may be a bad wheel bearing. Over time the bearing will wear slightly, allowing microscopic pieces of metal into the grease. Bearing noise can sound a lot like a brake pad dragging or grinding. It can also sound like whirring, whining or humming depending on how much sound deadening material your vehicle has in it. Bearing noise will always be dependent on vehicle speed meaning as you speed up or slow down the noise should change frequency or loudness. Cornering may affect the noise from a damaged front wheel bearing and is usually more pronounced as you make turns. I would suggest having a professional from Your Mechanic come to your location to diagnose and inspect your vehicle.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced mechanics :

If you notice a grinding or grating noise coming from your wheel or tire, take note that this is very likely caused by a bad wheel bearing—especially if the noise gets louder as the vehicle accelerates. Another revealing sign of bad wheel bearings: A car that feels loose as you drive it.
If your car makes a humming noise, it could mean the differential needs lubricant, the transmission is failing or the universal joints or wheel bearings are wearing out. What to do about it: Pay close attention to what happens before and when your car starts making the sound.
The most common reasons a Pontiac G6 has a rattling noise are the ball joints, struts or strut mount, or a problem with the sway bar links.
Other common sources of whirring noises and water pumps, alternators, air conditioning pumps and worn clutches – anything that spins, will have a bearing in, and can wear out. A worn water pump can cause parts such as the pump pulley to wobble as they rotate causing the noise as you drive.
If a ball joint is beginning to fail, you may notice a clunking noise coming from the front wheels. This clunking noise will become louder and more frequent over time. You may also notice that your steering has been affected by the bad ball joint, potentially causing vibration in the steering wheel.
A healthy drive emits mild and regular sounds of whirring. Mentioned above, a solitary hard clicking sound can mean the heads are getting parked. But if a hard clicking persists or is accompanied by any kind of repeating clunking (or grinding) sound, then there is likely a physical issue with the drive.
3. A humming or growling noise. This can be due to inadequate lubrication in either the inner or outer CV joint caused by a damaged or split boot.
A failing or dirty sensor can send incorrect data, resulting in too much or too little fuel going to the engine. This can result in a rough running engine that is louder than normal. Bad or Dirty Spark Plugs: Bad spark plugs can cause the vehicle to misfire which will make it run louder.
A loose center console cover, broken glove box hinge, or even an item resting in the door panel pocket or cup holder can suddenly start rattling at idle. So, if you hear rattling when your car is idling, check carefully around the interior, including the trunk or cargo area.
A rattling noise in that area can be a number of things including bad struts, timing chain issue, or bent suspension components. You should have the front suspension sway bar bushings or link arms inspected for loose or worn components and repaired as needed.
If you hear a clunking noise that is especially prominent when you drive over potholes or speed bumps, you probably have a problem with your shock absorbers or your suspension. Continuing to drive with a broken or faulty shock absorber is a bad idea for the health of your car.
Try fixing noises from an external hard drive by plugging the power adapter directly into the wall instead of a power strip, using a shorter USB cable, using USB 2.0+ ports, or connecting the hard drive to a USB port on the back of the computer instead of the front.
Worn Out Joints

If you`re experiencing a loud popping or clicking sound when sharply turning, it`s likely an outer joint issue with the CV axle.

If you drive a car with a damaged CV, the joint will deteriorate more, making driving impossible. You`ll be at risk of getting into an accident. In summary, it is advisable to neve drive a vehicle with faulty CV joints.
If you hear a rattling noise while driving, the first step is to not ignore it. The sounds and vibrations coming from your vehicle could be signs of a serious mechanical issue. Seek help from a professional who can find the source of the noise before any further damage is done.
if they get worn, stuck or out of alignment, a rattling noise may be heard, especially at low rpms.
Damaged Tie Rod Ends: Tie rods connect your steering system to help move the wheels when you turn your steering wheel. Creaking while turning can be a sign of damaged tie rods, but it`s more usual to hear a knocking sound when making tight, low-speed turns.
Problems with the 2007 G6 are fairly serious including steering issues, headlight failures, and frequent oil leaks. Steering problems are the most common complaint from owners showing up at around 50,000 miles. The steering makes clunking and snapping noises and the steering shaft is the source of the problem.
You usually hear this noise when accelerating the vehicle. Most people call this a pinging or rattling sound. This noise is caused by an air/fuel mixture in the engine cylinder being ignited prematurely by the heat of compression as the piston is moving up on the compression stroke.
Clunking

If the clunk happens when you drive over bumps, there might be a problem with your car`s suspension, or part of the exhaust could be loose. However, if your car clunks when you`re turning corners, it could be a problem with the steering, wheels and tyres, or a worn-out wheel bearing.

Poor Fuel-Air Ratio

When combustion doesn`t happen in a timely manner, the exhaust valve opens while the air-fuel mixture is still igniting, causing this explosion to “spill” out of the cylinder, making a loud popping noise. In newer vehicles, computerized sensors help ensure the air-fuel ratio is correct.

There are four sounds in particular that you should look out for: creaking, grunting, rattling, and knocking. See your auto collision center if you hear any of these noises, and keep reading for more on the four sounds of suspension problems.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Rubbing noise coming from the front driver’s side tire. What could be the problem?
ANSWER : The wheel hub bearing could be getting noisy or the scraping noise could be caused by the brake pad material. The most common cause of such noise is when the metallic material in the brake pad makes a scraping noise when brakes are not being applied and then it becomes noisier when the brakes are applied.

Bad or faulty lower control arm bushings will cause the noise to resonate through the frame and body of the car when compared to good rubber bushings that would normally isolate most of the noise.

First, get a certified technician, such as one from YourMechanic, to replace the control arm bushings and check the brakes for any cracks in the brake pad material and excessive metal material in the pads that can cause the noise. At the same time, get the wheel hub bearings checked for noise and replaced, if necessary.

Rattling noise from front driver tire after wheel bearing replacement
ANSWER : Hi there. On a front wheel drive vehicle, the only two items that could possible cause this, besides a wheel bearing that was not properly lubricated and installed during the replacement, would be a brake caliper that is dragging on the brake rotor or a CV axle or joint that is damaged. Really without completing a physical inspection or test drive, any ’guesses’ on our part would simply be an educated guess. It’s probably best to have a professional mechanic complete a test drive and try to diagnose this problem before making or suggesting any repairs.

Squeeking noise coming from front driver-side tire only
ANSWER : It is possible you have worn brake pads and the sensor is telling you the pads are worn down too far. Since you also had an ABS light come on you may have a bad bearing and sensor in that wheel. I would recommend have the brakes get a complete inspection and also have the ABS scanned for codes. You will most likely have a bad bearing assembly on the noisey wheel.

A whining noise starting at 20 m/ph as well as oscillating noise which speeds up and slows down – coming from drivers side.
ANSWER : Hello, thank you for writing in. Due to having the tires replaced recently, you may have a balance issue. Tires are "balanced" in a process where they spin the wheel on a machine and make sure they turn evenly. Any issues are corrected by adding weights to certain parts of the tire. The tires may have been improperly balanced, or may not have been balanced at all. You should start there, and see if the issues is resolved. When they have the wheels off, have a technician check the brakes. Make sure the pads were properly installed and are in place. Between the two inspections and any possible corrections, the issue would go away. If the noises continue, you will want to have the wheel assemblies inspected.

New front pads & rotors (2mths) and hear a grinding noise when coming to a slow gradual stop. What could be causing this?
ANSWER : Hello, thank you for writing in. The last technicians that worked on your vehicle are not wrong. There are certain types of brake pads that will make a squealing noise when the brakes are applied. These are typically made from a metal composite material. You can always research the brand they put on and find out more about the brake pads. This would give you a good idea of what you should reasonably expect. Are the brakes exhibiting any other types of symptoms? If there is any sponginess in the pedal, shaking or vibrating, hard stops, or other symptoms then there may be more cause for concern. In situations like these, if you are expecting to drive the vehicle a longer distance in the near future, it is recommended that you get a second opinion. Our technicians can dispatch to your home or office.

Loud repetitive noise coming from front tire in 2 wheel drive, goes away when in 4 wheel drive.
ANSWER : Hello, thank you for writing in. Chances are there was an existing issue that was amplified by the tire rotation. There are several parts that will cause similar symptoms. You will want to consider the parts that are under load in 4wd, that are free when in 2wd. This would include the axle and sveral joints. There are a couple of tests that can be done. More damage was likely done driving on dry pavement in 4wd. It was a good step in diagnostics, but should be avoided. For more help with diagnosing the sounds, contact our service department to schedule an appointment.

Squeaking noise comes from wheels as it spins.
ANSWER : If the noise does not exist with the vehicle stopped (i.e., due to engine noise), then it is likely due to wheel bearings or the brakes. If brake related, unfortunately these sorts of noises can be related to the use of non-OEM rotors and brake pads and also the failure to re-apply factory specified shims and/or appropriate anti-squeal compounds and lubricants. You also want to check and ensure that no pistons are stuck in the calipers and the sliding pins in the torque plates are all freely moving. Unfortunately, once non-OEM parts and materials are used, and thus in essence an "experiment" is set up, brake noise can be a result. Missing shims should be considered and the possibility of a lubricant solution should be considered. If the pads are non-OEM and the noise arises from pad material, really the only solution is to remove the pads and install the more appropriate OEM Toyota friction material (rotors should be re-surfaced and/or de-glazed if any pad substitution is attempted). In the event that your car might have been retrofitted with something like high-performance carbon-metallic brake pads, note that those friction materials are well known to be more prone to unusual noises. If you would like a second opinion regarding this issue, please simply request a brake noise diagnostic and a certified mechanic will be dispatched by YourMechanic to evaluate your brakes, as well as the wheel bearings, and address all of your concerns.

crunching noise coming from front left hand side of vehicle that I can feel in the steering wheel
ANSWER : Hi there:

It really depends on what type of 1998 Ford you have, but in general, yes; there are individual components in the front suspension that could cause this type of noise to occur, ranging from steering stabilizer bushings to ball joints or CV joints being worn out and needing to be replaced. The best way to diagnose this issue is to contact a mobile mechanic and have them complete a car is making a noise inspection. It’s best to drive your car for about 20 minutes or so before the mechanic arrives so they can replicate the conditions.