Do you recommend OEM axles? Aftermarket are much cheaper with a lifetime warranty. 2006 Honda Odyssey

Is there any brand you recommend or ones to avoid? Some say you must use OEM and some say avoid Duralast. Just not sure if it is worth paying an extra $150
My car has an automatic transmission.
Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hello – the big question as to quality of replacement parts is "How good is good enough?". For the answer – consider the total cost of the project, especially labor. If labor cost to replace a part, even if under warranty, is high – like an axle replacement – higher initial cost for a quality part becomes "cheap" in the bigger picture. Parts quality reputation, as well as warranty, is important. Buy your parts, and labor, from reputable, trusted source.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

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Axle / CV shaft assemblies do not really have a “best before” date. Most of the time, they will last the life of your vehicle. However, having said that, keep in mind that whenever your car is in motion, your axle / CV shaft assembly is working.
It is always a good idea to replace CV joints or CV axles in pairs. This is due to the fact that under most circumstances, each of a vehicle`s two axles will incur approximately the same amount of wear within a given time frame.
One of the biggest advantages of getting your CV joint replaced is the smooth ride you get afterward. Your car will stop vibrating as much and the ride will be much smoother and safer. If you like driving, this will be a therapeutic experience for you and you will fall in love with driving again.
Broken or bent, a bad axle must be replaced as soon as possible! It is a serious safety issue, and driving with a broken axle causes major damage to your car. Because the axle is a vital part that keeps the wheels in place and supports your car`s weight.
CV axle boots last for quite some time (80,000 miles) and are not items needing periodic replacement. But you absolutely should inspect them at least once a year, or even more often on cars with high mileage. They are most affected by prolonged off-road driving or heavy use in transportation-industry conditions.
Wrong Axle, Bad Engineering

If the axle is too long, it can cause the CV or plunge joint to bottom out and damage the surfaces of the balls, bearings and races. If it`s too short, the axle could pull out of the plunge joint under certain conditions.

Many drivers are not aware that the performance of their vehicle`s wheel system is basically dependent on the condition of the CV joints and car axles. These components are involved in the steering, driving, and braking of the vehicle, linking the power from the engine to the wheels.
CV axles have inner and outer joints with a “boot” on each end. CV axle failures are usually caused by a broken or leaking boot, which is often followed by failing bearings in a joint.
Do CV Axles Need to Be Replaced in Pairs? No, you can replace just one axle if that is all you need. Some services like tire replacements can require you to install in pairs, but this is not the case for CV axles.
CV axles have inner and outer joints with a “boot” on each end. CV axle failures are usually caused by a broken or leaking boot, which is often followed by failing bearings in a joint.
They must be in such a condition that they are able to carry the whole weight of the vehicle, plus passengers and cargo. If undamaged, these joints can last up to 100,000 miles without need for replacement.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Do you recommend OEM axles? Aftermarket are much cheaper with a lifetime warranty. 2006 Honda Odyssey
ANSWER : Hello – the big question as to quality of replacement parts is "How good is good enough?". For the answer – consider the total cost of the project, especially labor. If labor cost to replace a part, even if under warranty, is high – like an axle replacement – higher initial cost for a quality part becomes "cheap" in the bigger picture. Parts quality reputation, as well as warranty, is important. Buy your parts, and labor, from reputable, trusted source.

Hello. Do you recommend aftermarket or OEM for the front CV shaft assembly?
ANSWER : Hi there. The aftermarket parts and OEM parts are certified to be operated on the vehicle. You can operate your vehicle with aftermarket parts as long as the part is the same design. I recommend using the OEM specified part as it was intended to be used on the vehicle, but for budget reasons, any aftermarket part will work. Make sure that you read the reviews on the part from different part retail stores as a reference to your understanding on how long or good the parts are. If you need further assistance with replacing the CV Shafts on your vehicle, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

Would you consider an aftermarket CV axle or only a genuine Honda one?
ANSWER : Hi. The after market axle is not that much difference in quality then the dealership axle. The after market axle will also come with at least a 3 year warranty or even a lifetime warranty. The dealership axle will not have a warranty at all. The reason the price is so much higher at the dealership is the dealership has to buy the axle from Honda and after that the dealership marks it up as high as they want making the axle $725. The after market axle will do the job just as well as the dealership axle. Before you replace the axle I suggest you have the rest of your front end suspension checked for loose or worn parts that could cause this problem. We have certified technicians at YourMechanic that can come and inspect your front end and install your axle.

aloha! i was told it would cost me $1870 to get a rear axle replacement. i have a 2006 toyota sequoia with mileage of 80,000. it
ANSWER : Aloha. Ah – the infamous "it’s all gone" excuse. To be quite blunt, you’re being ripped off. If a professional mechanic can’t explain what exactly is damaged with any mechanical component, they are taking advantage of you. I would get your car back and contact a different mechanic. Or, feel free to send us some information about the symptoms your car is experiencing that led you to take the car to the mechanic in the first place. Maybe we can help diagnose your issue and allow you to bring that info to a different mechanic. Mahalo.

How much does it cost to replace the lug nut stud on a 2006 Honda Pilot EXL
ANSWER : The cost depends on whether it is in the rear or the front and also on whether there is space behind the wheel hub to push out the stud and draw in a new one. If the wheel hub does not have to be removed from the vehicle (due to no space) the cost is minimal, amounting to the cost of a mobile service call (the stud itself is around $2). On your vehicle, though, if the stud is in the front, the wheel hub probably has to be removed from within the wheel bearing to replace a stud and to do that the steering knuckle has to be removed from the car. Unfortunately, the technology is such that once you press that hub out of the bearing (the bearing is retained in the knuckle; the hub must be pressed out), the races of the bearing get indented by the ball bearings and if you put that now damaged bearing back in service, you will get noise and eventual bearing failure. So, as a practical matter, to replace that $2 stud, you are essentially looking at the cost of wheel bearing replacement. Also, if you do have to remove the knuckle and have the hub out, ALL of the studs should be replaced because the only reason studs break, or are damaged, is if they are over tightened. Not likely that just that one was over tightened. At a part cost of $2 per stud, better to replace all than to put it all back together and have the next one break. As a practical matter, if you schedule wheel bearing replacement – wheel studs the responding certified mechanic will FIRST check to see if the stud(s) can be replaced without the disassembly that I have described. If not, and if you still desire replacement of the stud(s), the mechanic will remove the hub in the general procedure that I have indicated. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you .

I was told by a Honda Dealer that the axle seals must be replaced in the front. I want to get a second opinion.
ANSWER : The axle seals are pressed into the transaxle case and their purpose is simply to keep the transmission fluid from leaking out of the transmission (and keep dirt and water out of the transmission, too, of course). There is an axle seal on the left and a seal on the right, so two altogether. The seals themselves are very inexpensive, typically costing anywhere from $5 to $25, depending on whether you buy them on Ebay or the dealer (genuine OEM dealer parts are recommended). Although the sealing surface on the seal is made of rubber, it would be unusual for these seals to have failed, that is leaked, on a 4 year old car with only 79,000 miles. It would be even more unusual, indeed statistically improbable, for BOTH (left and right) seals to have failed at the same time. So, your case presents as a bit of a mystery. Failure of seals of this type will evidence themselves as an external leak of transmission fluid and there will be clear, visible, unmistakable evidence of the leak, if they are leaking. What you could have done at the Honda dealer, once they alleged a seal failure, was told the Mechanic, "show me", "show me the leak". If they won’t, or can’t, show you externally visible evidence of a leak then, quite simply, you don’t have a leak. Sometimes, by the way, to deal with an unexpected question like, "show me", they’ll tell you they can’t "due to insurance regulations" preventing you from entering the shop. "Insurance regulations", translated into English, means that there’s no leak on your car.

A leak of this type, if it exists, is important though and has to be fixed so this should be resolved. You could go back to the dealer and simply ask them to show you the leak evidence, on your car, so that you can gain an understanding of exactly what is going on. If they do not indulge you immediately and show and explain everything to your satisfaction, you got your answer right there: that is not a professional shop out to help YOU and indeed you may not even have a leak. The point is to resolve this, you need to see the leak before you make a decision. YourMechanic can look at the vehicle and see if there is evidence of a leak. And, if you do have a leak, regarding the cost to install new seals, you might want to get a second opinion as well, again something YourMechanic can assist you with. As noted at the outset, the cost of these seals is frankly trivial. It is really the labor cost to get to those seals which is material. As you may know, YourMechanic dispatches mobile mechanics, who have the same (or better) certifications that the Mechanics in the shops have but almost none of the overhead. Consequently, for a seal replacement of this type, if it turns out that you need it, the savings might be substantial. As you explore your options, if you have further concerns or questions, by all means please feel free to recontact us.

Throttle body replaced under warranty has a defect, now out of warranty.
ANSWER : Hi there:

Although we’re not lawyers and not permitted to provide legal advice, to my knowledge, State of California "lemon laws" apply to new vehicle purchases as opposed to replacement services; however, you might want to contact the California Bureau of Automotive Repair for specific guidelines. What I’d advise is to not continue taking your vehicle to a dealership if they are not going to cover the components under warranty. Instead have a professional mobile mechanic complete these repairs; or sell the Suzuki and purchase something a little more reliable; as fuel system issues are common with these vehicles.

The camshaft in our Honda Odyssey 2006 is worn out and the car has been making a ticking noise
ANSWER : Hi – that amount seems rather excessive, and perhaps the mechanic is telling you "I don’t want to perform this task." Replacing the camshafts (there are 2) is not an inexpensive task), but there are other alternatives if engine repair/replacement are necessary. Replacing your current engine with a "Japanese Domestic Market" engine (used engine from japan) is a good value alternative. Their emissions laws are far stricter than ours, and cars are recycled with much lower mileage than in the U.S., and reputable importers of these engines are available. Another alternative, if the engine does not have other bad behavior than the ticking noise, is to simply continue to drive it, and turn up the radio. It comes down to a cost/benefit decision. I would have another mechanic inspect the noise to give you their assessment of the situation before deciding on a costly repair like this.