Coolant leaking from car

I have a slight leak in the cooling system. It holds pressure, but I am adding one to two quarts of coolant every two weeks.
Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Coolant can leak from many places. The radiator, hoses, thermostat housing, freeze plugs, water pump, and heater core for example are all places that are common for coolant to leak from. The leak usually gets worse after the car is driven because hot coolant expands and builds pressure in the system forcing the coolant out. A mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, can run a pressure test to force the leak without the engine running. This will help pinpoint the leak quickly and safely. Leaks will only get bigger and if the coolant gets low enough your car will overheat. I suggest you get it looked at before this happens to avoid any secondary damage from it overheating.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

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The most common reasons a BMW X5 has a coolant leak are loose hose connections, a broken radiator, or a failed water pump. Search our network of RepairPal Certified shops near you to speak with a technician about your issue.
Most common in the BMW X5 is the valley pan—a staging area where coolant collects before being transferred to different parts of the engine block. The valley pan can corrode, and then it will leak coolant from a hole that just keeps getting bigger and bigger.
One issue that may arise in your BMW. Coolant leaks can stem from a handful of problems: damaged radiator, a bad head gasket, or a weak radiator cap. As soon as you notice a coolant leak, you will want to seek professional help right away, as this can lead to very serious problems for your engine.
If you do see a coolant leak under your car, it could be from a blown head gasket, but it could also be from a number of other problems. Typically, if the head gaskets look normal, the problem is in the radiator. Remember, the coolant cycles through the radiator to lose heat it collected in the engine.
Corrosion within the radiator is one of the leading reasons that coolant leaks. As the tubes get older and weaker, you may get sediment or debris inside that causes a leak. The sealing gasket between the tank and the radiator can also wear out, and that could lead to a leak.
If you suspect coolant has leaked into your engine, stop driving immediately and see a mechanic.
It may be a broken hose and/or a hole in the radiator. Solution: Check your hoses to see if any coolant is coming out. Replace the hose(s) if you notice coolant coming out of them. If you notice coolant leaking out of your thermostat that can be an easy fix.
So what does it mean when coolant or oil leaks out of the weep hole? If you see coolant, it means that you have a leaking coolant seal. If you see oil, then there`s a bad oil seal. Don`t be alarmed if you find a small amount of moisture or even oil around the weep hole; it`s pretty normal.
The average cost to fix a leaking radiator is $340, with a range between $125 and $600. Your total cost will depend on a number of factors, such as the type of repair needed, the type of radiator you have and the materials required.
While driving with a coolant leak doesn`t pose an immediate threat to your well-being, we highly recommend that you avoid doing so. Driving a car that is leaking coolant can cause serious damage to your engine. Your engine can overheat, costing you big time.
Yellow – Yellow fluid indicates a radiator coolant leak, which can happen if there is a loose hose clamp or a damaged o-ring. This is vital to fix as soon as possible. Green – Green fluid can point to an antifreeze leak. Antifreeze can start to leak when certain hoses, fittings, or clamps have worn out.
You can catch an external leak if you pay close attention to your BMW`s temperature gauge. If you`ve lost coolant from a leak, your car may start to overheat. A second way to spot a coolant leak is the smell. Coolant has a sweet smell which you may notice if it exits the cooling system.
It may be a broken hose and/or a hole in the radiator. Solution: Check your hoses to see if any coolant is coming out. Replace the hose(s) if you notice coolant coming out of them. If you notice coolant leaking out of your thermostat that can be an easy fix.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

My car is leaking coolant and telling me to stop the car and check coolant.
ANSWER : Going by your description and the age of the car, I’m going to guess you have a problem with your water pump. The water pump has a rotating seal that often doesn’t leak unless the engine is running. If your water pump is leaking you might be able to see a drip from the bottom of the engine front cover. Before jumping to any conclusions though, you should have a professional pressure test the system to be sure. If you contact Your Mechanic. they can send a technician to your home or office to check out your leak and tell you what it will take to solve it.

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No coolant in the reservoir. Seen low coolant message. I added 2 quarts of 50/50 coolant. Still getting the message. How much coolant doe it need?
ANSWER : Hi there. For the coolant light to go out, you would need to have the coolant between the low line and the full line for the light to go out. If the coolant is low and keeps on being low, then look for any signs of coolant leaks. You may have to use a coolant pressure tester to pressurize the reservoir to allow the leak to be found.

If you need further assistance with the coolant being low and the warning light being on, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

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My car has a coolant leak – 2001 Lincoln Town Car
ANSWER : The heater AC (air conditioning) case has a drain to let out condensation from the case. The heater core is positioned in the case that allows it get out through the case drain on the outside of the engine firewall between the center toward the passenger side of the car in the case of a leak. Bypassing the heater core has stopped the leak but the heater and defroster is not inoperative along with the automatic temperature control of the air conditioner. I recommend having the heater core inspected and replaced to fix the system.

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Oil leaking from under car and "remote control car" sound when car is first started for a few minutes until it warm up.
ANSWER : Hello,
There are a number of things that could make an engine noisy when starting up. Depending on the specific type of sound you are referring to, this will determine how to properly diagnose. If there is a bit of a hissing sound, this may be a sign of a vacuum leak. If this is more of a shrieking sound, this may be a sign of a worn out or out of adjustment serpentine belt. If there is a bit of a howling or growling sound, this may be a sign of a worn out or low on fluid power steering pump. A rattling or pinging sound may be caused by an ignition problem. An engine can ping (or knock) due to an improper combustion process. A "spark knock" is the result of combustion occurring too early. Early combustion can occur from carbon buildup inside the combustion chamber, a lean air/fuel mixture, and advanced ignition timing (spark plug firing too soon). A clattering type sound may be a result of improper lubrication in the valve train which could be a more serious problem and should be addressed as soon as possible. I would suggest having an expert from YourMechanic come to your location to diagnose and inspect your vehicle to ensure everything is in proper working order.

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Fuel EVAP line that runs under car is kinked how do I know if it is leaking? Also can I drive it like that if it’s not leaking?
ANSWER : Hi Ricardo. We answered your question earlier. However, if you didn’t receive the reply, here is what we stated earlier. In most cases, an EVAP leak will create an OBD-II trouble code. The best way to detect an EVAP leak is by having a professional mobile mechanic complete a check engine light inspection, they will be able to download the code and determine the source of the leak. That’s the best advice we can offer you. Thanks.

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My car has a coolant leak
ANSWER : Hello. The most common cause of a random coolant loss on this vehicle is a leaking intake manifold gasket. It commonly starts leaking coolant into the engine, which will be burnt off or will leak externally. I typically do a pressure test and a dye test on the system first to see if I can locate an external leak. If nothing is found, then I do a block test to make sure that there is not a head gasket issue. If nothing shows up there, then I replace the intake gaskets. If you need to have this done, consider YourMechanic, as a certified mechanic can come to your home or office to diagnose the coolant leak and replace the intake gaskets if necessary.

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Fuel EVAP line that runs under car is kinked how do I know if it is leaking? Also can I drive it like that if it’s not leaking?
ANSWER : Hi there. In most cases, an EVAP leak will create an OBD-II trouble code, which is the best way to detect an EVAP leak. By having a professional mobile mechanic complete a check engine light inspection, they will be able to download the code and determine the source of the leak. In most cases, it’s an EVAP purge solenoid that is faulty.

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Car leaks coolant when left overnight
ANSWER : Hi there. In some instances, after a radiator is replaced, a coolant line can be left loose by accident or can come loose as the hose clamp gets hot. If the car is parked on a slight uphill slope, the radiator coolant might be leaking from one of the top cooling lines or from the radiator overflow reservoir hose.

The best way to know exactly where your vehicle is leaking coolant from is to have a local mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, come to your location to complete an inspection to determine the source of the leak.

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