Catalyctic chugging issues

My calactic converter was plugged causing my car to turn off and chugg. I removed it and was temporaily puttinf straight pipe on after i did that. The car had no power and and was acting like it was going to stall

My car has 224000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hello.

If the issue started after the catalytic converter was removed, then it may be possible that the issue is related to the removal of the converter.

For many vehicles, the catalytic converter plays an important role in engine performance. If the converter is removed, it may disrupt the exhaust system back pressure, which can negatively affect engine performance.

It may also be possible that an exhaust leak developed when the cat was removed. I would recommend reinstalling the cat to see if that may perhaps solve the issue.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

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Hesitant Acceleration

Your engine also struggles to generate its normal amounts of power, especially when attempting to accelerate. The oxygen sensor in your car often exacerbates the hesitant acceleration caused by a bad catalytic converter.

The short answer is yes. A clogged catalytic converter can cause your vehicle to lose power, causing frequent and harder steps on your gas pedal. A clogged converter combined with spark plug misfires can lead to the overheating of your engine.
The catalytic converter helps with the airflow into the engine by allowing exhaust gases through. If the catalytic converter gets clogged, the airflow to the engine is compromised, and you will find your vehicle`s acceleration sluggish.
If you`re noticing slow powertrain performance, reduced acceleration, a smell of rotten eggs or sulfur from the exhaust, dark exhaust smoke, or extreme heat from under the vehicle, these are symptoms of a clogged Catalytic Converter, and it should be replaced quickly.
This hesitation while accelerating can be the result of a number of issues, including something like a clogged fuel filter or even a broken fuel pump. Sometimes, something could also be wrong with the transmission.
One of the first symptoms commonly associated with a bad or failing catalytic converter is a reduction in engine performance. The catalytic converter is built into the vehicle`s exhaust system, and as a result, can affect the performance of the engine if it develops any problems.
Most catalytic converter failures fall under one of three categories: Overheated, melted or broken converters.
Yes. While the damage may seem small initially, the longer you drive with a bad oxygen sensor, the worse the damage will become. Eventually, you may experience rough idling, poor acceleration, engine misfires, an illuminated check engine light, and failed emission tests.
As we just mentioned, a missing catalytic converter will make your engine very loud. In fact, the engine will roar. You may not have realized this but the catalytic converter helps to muffle some of the engine and exhaust noise. Now that the converter is missing, your engine will be louder than normal.
For example, if you typically fill your vehicle with the cheapest low-octane fuel, try running your vehicle on a few tanks of high-octane fuel. Adding one gallon of lacquer thinner to ten gallons of gas at your next refuel may also be effective clearing out catalytic converter deposits.
The catalytic converter is responsible for turning poisonous carbon monoxide into the much safer carbon dioxide before it`s released through the tailpipe. A failing catalytic converter can cause your engine to sputter, overheat, and smell like rotten eggs.
There are a range of reasons why your car is juddering when you accelerate. Your vehicle could have dirty fuel injectors, a damaged fuel pump, a blocked catalytic converter, a faulty mass airflow sensor, broken spark plugs, or even an accumulation of moisture.
The catalytic converter is responsible for turning poisonous carbon monoxide into the much safer carbon dioxide before it`s released through the tailpipe. A failing catalytic converter can cause your engine to sputter, overheat, and smell like rotten eggs.
Failed Oxygen Sensor: If one of the oxygen sensors in your exhaust system has failed, the computer cannot monitor the emissions, and pressure may drop, creating hesitation and bucking.
For the most part, anything that affects the engine performance will lead to trouble shifting gears in your car. A clogged catalytic converter makes the engine work harder, which in turn makes it difficult to shift the transmission.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Car jerks when accelerating in reverse & makes grinding noise. Is this a transmission or computer issue?
ANSWER : Hi there. Typically when you hear a grinding noise when you move forward or in reverse it’s usually an indication of a gear fault either in the transmission or another driveline component. If this occurs only when in reverse, it’s likely a damaged reverse gear. It is also possible that it’s a hydraulic fluid issue not supplying enough lubrication or pressure inside the lines to fully open the gear. I would recommend having a professional mechanic come to your location and complete a car is hard to shift inspection, so they can diagnose the source of your issue and recommend repairs that should resolve this problem.

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How do I tell the difference between an alternator issue and a starter issue?
ANSWER : If the starter motor is turning the engine over at adequate RPM, then you definitely do not have a starter motor issue. Even if you had a bad alternator (and the alternator should absolutely be tested, certainly when you install a new battery because you want to be sure the charging function is working properly) that would not prevent the car from starting. So, if the starter is turning the engine over, but the motor won’t run, you have either a fault in the fuel or ignition systems, or the air induction system. To "quickly" determine if it is a fuel system problem, you can try introducing starter fluid into the intake while cranking and if the vehicle starts at that point that would be an indication that you have, at least, inadequate fuel delivery perhaps due to a fuel pump issue. The most efficient approach to getting this resolved is to just simply request a no start diagnostic and the responding certified mechanic will make quick work of this for you. At the conclusion of the diagnostic he will let you know of the fault and the cost to repair. Please let us know how we can best assist you to get your vehicle running properly.

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What is wrong with my car?
ANSWER : If the vehicle is not starting, simply request a no start diagnostic and the responding certified mechanic will get the underlying fault identified and resolved. Basically, the first thing to do is load test the battery. Although I understand your suspicion that the immobilizer may be preventing the car from starting, until an actual diagnostic is performed that is a speculative cause. If the immobilizer system is on, you may see a security warning light. If you see such a light, to temporarily override the immobilizer system, see these instructions. If you do not see a warning light, again I would not assume that the immobilizer is the problem because there are lots of other potential causes for the no start you are describing.

With a fully charged battery and the immobilizer system off, if the starter motor does not operate, either there is no power to the starter motor, hence the starter circuit would have to be diagnosed, or the starter itself is bad and it would be replaced. If there is no starter motor operation at all, that is if there is no starter operation with the key held in the "start" position, the procedure is to test for power and voltage drops to the starter motor/solenoid. If there is no power or a large voltage drop is measured, then the electrical circuit supplying the motor has a fault. That circuit begins at the battery and includes grounds, wiring (some of which is very heavy cabling), fuses, relays, the ignition switch, neutral start switch, and terminations. Basically, with a fully charged battery, and with the key held in the "start" position, the starter is either getting power or it isn’t. With the key in the "start" position, if the starter motor is getting power but the starter doesn’t work, then the starter is condemned and replaced. Note that starters can and sometimes do develop intermittent faults due to bad spots on the armature. The bottom line is if there is battery voltage to the starter (and no excessive voltage drop) and yet the starter doesn’t work, it’s dead. If you desire that a certified mechanic resolve this, please request a no start diagnostic and the responding certified mechanic will get the problem diagnosed and repaired for you. Please let us know if you have further concerns or questions as we are always here to help you.

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ALTERNATOR ISSUE?
ANSWER : The voltage put out by the alternator is typically in the range of 14.2 V to 14.5 V as measured right across the battery posts. If the charging voltage is outside that range, then there is a problem with the charging circuit. The charging circuit includes the wiring, alternator, voltage regulator (often integral with the alternator), fuse link, and all terminal connections. So long as no fault is found in the wiring, fuse link and terminal connections, as measured using standard voltage drop testing, then typically the alternator would be condemned and replaced. Preferred replacement sources for the alternator are dealer OEM new, re-built dealer OEM, and aftermarket reputable name brand vendors such as AC Delco, Bosch, and so forth which may carry both new and rebuilt lines. New alternators are of course the preferred choice. If you desire that the charging system on the car be diagnosed for confirmation that you need a new alternator the recommended service is a charging diagnostic. Please let us know if you have additional questions.

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Blinking Check Engine Light, issues with rpm, possible spark plug issue?
ANSWER : Hey there. The gas smell you experience is most likely due to the unburned fuel due to the engine misfiring. Since you smell unburned fuel, the cause is most likely spark-related. If any spark plug is not firing correctly, the spark plugs themselves can be at fault or they can be the effect.

If an ignition coil is not firing the spark plug, then the bad coil is the cause and the misfiring plug is the effect. Also, the ignition coil may not be firing properly due to the coil itself being shorted or possible receiving a poor signal from the engine control unit.

You should have a certified technician look into the Check Engine Light as soon as possible. Continued driving with the light flashing can cause internal engine damage if not corrected.

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Car is chugging at low speeds and then stalls when I stop.
ANSWER : This may be related to a dirty or failing idle air control valve. The idle air control valve reads the air intake as it is mixed with fuel prior to being injected into the engine at low speeds and at idle. This valve is controlled by the vehicle’s computer which will adjust idle speed based upon other measurements such as engine temperature, intake air temperature and electrical system load or voltage. When you accelerate, the engine RPM increases, and as you let off the gas, the RPM slowly returns to the normal idling speed. This is all controlled by the idle air control valve. When the engine RPM drops below the normal range of 750-800 RPM (for most cars), this often times will cause the engine to stall indicating a dirty or faulty idle air control valve. I would recommend having an expert from YourMechanic come to your location to diagnose and repair your idle air control valve.

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Kia Sporate Engine check light issue and car stalled this morning!
ANSWER : The infamous "loose gas cap code" is P0442. P0434 is an issue with a heated catalytic converter not coming up to temperature quickly enough. It can be caused by the fuel injection being too rich. If you starter is not turning your engine over, the issue could be a dead battery.

If you can get it jumped off, most auto parts stores will check the battery for free. They will also, time permitting, check your engine codes for free. This will help guide diagnosis for whatever else is still wrong with your vehicle.

If you need assistance with the repairs from here, I would recommend having your Check Engine Light inspected by a certified technician, like one from YourMechanic, to diagnose the problem, get an accurate assessment of damage and cost estimate for repairs. YourMechanic can dispatch a mobile, professional mechanic to your location for this repair.

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Why does my car struggle to start every 4th to 5th time?
ANSWER : It sounds like your starting issues may be linked to a problem with air metering or fuel delivery. A clogged or malfunctioning idle air control valve may show some of the same symptoms you are describing. The idle air control valve can be stuck in a cold start position which may work well if the car has been sitting a few hours, but as the engine warms up there must be a regulation in airflow. Consider hiring an experienced technician like one from YourMechanic who can come out for a closer look at your hard start situation and offer a more personal diagnosis.

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