can i change the transmission fluid in my car. its pretty nasty

I just bought my car. And the transmission fluid is horrible dirtym.can I just change it. No flush just change

My car has 220000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
I have to say I’m hesitant to tell you yes for either a flush or changing the fluid and filter. "Horribly dirty fluid" and 220,000 miles are my reasons. If the fluid condition is that bad, then odds are the previous owner or owners may not have ever serviced the transmission, or it’s been too long since it was last serviced. If it is shifting fine, then maybe I’d risk changing the fluid and filter. If your motivation behind changing the fluid is that the transmission may not feel right, you may be opening a can of worms by changing the fluid. It sounds counter intuitive, I know. Why would I recommend NOT changing that dirty fluid ? Chalk that up to experience. It can go either way with that kind of mileage and fluid condition. You can service the transmission and it will be fine. Or, you can service the transmission and the car may not move after you’re done. I’d suggest taking it to a local transmission specialist and let them take a look at it before doing anything else.

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Changing your fluid cannot cause any damage by itself, if everything is fine inside the transmission. The issues start to appear when you change the fluid if your clutches are already worn or damaged from use. If you go and replace the fluid after they are already worn out. this can cause slipping.
There are many fluids that run throughout your vehicle, but one of the most important to keep track of is the transmission fluid. Whether or not you should change it is not a matter of debate: Yes, you should.
Castrol – Transmax ATF DEXRON®-VI Automatic Transmission Fluid 1 Quart (Part No. 15B1A0)
Changing the fluid on a regularly driven vehicle can only help revitalize the clutch material. If the fluid has never been changed on a regularly driven car, at 170,000 miles, you damn well need to completely flush the system!
And like engine oil, transmission fluid (also known as transmission oil or automatic transmission fluid/ATF) can simply go bad over time. Even if you have a full fluid level, the fluid itself may be burnt, cloudy, dirty or full of contaminants that build up through time and use.
Some of the benefits of a transmission flush are: The transmission runs cooler and receives the maximum protection against wear to clutches, gears, and bearings. More consistent shifting, since the new fluid provides more effective frictional properties.
Since fluids break down over time, it`s important to change your transmission fluid every 30,000 to 60,000 miles. Reviewing your car`s manual or researching manufacturer recommendations can help you ensure you change your transmission fluid at the right time.
The transmission fluid capacity on Your 2006 Chevy Impala is a total of 7.6 US quarts. If You`d also like to know what type of transmission fluid to use then it is Dexron VI. One of the products that You can use is Valvoline Full Synthetic Transmission Fluid Dexron VI.
Engine Oil

5W-30 (All TEMPS) – SAE 5W-30 is preferred.

After refilling the fluid, turn the vehicle on and allow it to run for a few minutes. Pull the transmission fluid dipstick out to verify that the fluid is at the correct level, then close the hood of the vehicle.
Excessive fluid prohibits proper lubrication and cooling and slows the rotating crankshaft, similar to the effect of running through water. When the air above mixes with the high levels of fluid, it creates a foamy substance that saturates the transmission. This can lead to: Part pitting.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

is it safe to change Transmission Fluid. Hasn’t been changed in a long time. Currently the Transmission is working fine; no slip
ANSWER : I agree with the other mechanic. If the fluid looks dirty then this means the transmission was not serviced for a long time and if you service it then the new fluid will wash out all the clutch material that is being held together by the old fluid. You would be taking a big chance that the transmission will start slipping within a week after you service it.

A 75-point safety inspection is a good idea after long-term storage, and a qualified technician from YourMechanic can perform this for you at your home or office.

New cars don’t have transmission fluid dipsticks Transmission fluid changing
ANSWER : That’s a very good question. The reason they have gone with no dipsticks is because they don’t want people messing with transmissions other there at the dealership. Some cars went through that a couple of decades ago. They make it a very involved, convoluted process all through, in order to change the fluid on these modern cars. They have special adapters you have to put. Some of them have to have scan computers in order to read the data and what’s in there, and then be able to change it. A lot of these companies claim that this new fluid is the "lifetime" fluid.

Most new use synthetic fluid can last a long time but any fluid is going to get dirty and wear out over time. I would change it at least every 80,000 – 100,000 miles but if you’ve got one that is really hard to change, you are better off hiring a mechanic to do it.

On some of the cars, it would be too hard for the do-it-yourself because of all that equipment you need. The professional mechanics already have that. Just call any good mechanic, like one from YourMechanic, and they will be able to perform a transmission fluid service for you.

Do I need to get the transfer case fluid and transmission fluid changed?
ANSWER : Hi, thanks for writing in. I looked at your maintenance schedule for your vehicle and found that for up to 150,000 miles, it only says to inspect the fluid level and not change it. The fluids are special fluids and if you did need any work done (i.e. if there is a leak present or other mechanical problem) then make sure the correct Ford certified fluid is used.

When it is time for you to have your transmission fluid serviced, consider having a certified automotive technician from YourMechanic come to your home or office to perform the service for you.

Hope this helps and best of luck!

There is automatic transmission fluid in a manual transmission. Is it okay to leave or do I need manual transmission fluid?
ANSWER : This would depend on what the manufacturer recommends. Many manual transmissions do take automatic transmission fluid. If your transmission has ATF in it, it is very likely that it is supposed to have that in there. If not, it is likely that the transmission would not function properly with the wrong fluid. Many manual transmissions will also take engine oil as a lubricant. The best way to know for sure is to check your owner’s manual or call your local General Motors dealership to inquire.

Should I change the transmission fluid?
ANSWER : Generally, when the transmission fluid turns a brown color, it has been broken down and is no longer providing the protection needed for the transmission. As you know, the transmission fluid is designed to provide lubrication, protection and hydraulic pressure. As it breaks down over time, it may lose these qualities and lessen the effect on the transmission potentially resulting in transmission problems. I would recommend having a professional from YourMechanic come to your location to perform a transmission fluid service.

My car is leaking transmission fluid – I can’t diagnose the leak
ANSWER : Based on the NHTSA database covering consumer complaints, as well as government mandated recalls and factory service bulletins, for your specific year, make and model, I do not see evidence of widespread complaints about transmission fluid leaks. Such leaks are, in fact, common in transmissions made by any car company, particularly if the transmission is older than say 10 years. There is a manual shaft seal, oil pan gasket, output shaft seals, case seals, torque converter seal (inaccessible) and so forth all of which are potential leak points on your transmission.

If you want to identify and resolve these leaks, certainly a certified Mechanic from YourMechanic could come out and perform a transmission leak inspection and let you know where the leak points are and what it will cost to resolve them.

can i change the transmission fluid in my car. its pretty nasty
ANSWER : I have to say I’m hesitant to tell you yes for either a flush or changing the fluid and filter. "Horribly dirty fluid" and 220,000 miles are my reasons. If the fluid condition is that bad, then odds are the previous owner or owners may not have ever serviced the transmission, or it’s been too long since it was last serviced. If it is shifting fine, then maybe I’d risk changing the fluid and filter. If your motivation behind changing the fluid is that the transmission may not feel right, you may be opening a can of worms by changing the fluid. It sounds counter intuitive, I know. Why would I recommend NOT changing that dirty fluid ? Chalk that up to experience. It can go either way with that kind of mileage and fluid condition. You can service the transmission and it will be fine. Or, you can service the transmission and the car may not move after you’re done. I’d suggest taking it to a local transmission specialist and let them take a look at it before doing anything else.

I pressed my gas and my car didnt accelerate. There is transmission fluid in my car and my car cranks great and runs great…
ANSWER : This kind of reaction is often a sign of low transmission fluid or a faulty transmission control solenoid. As you know, automatic transmissions use pressurized hydraulic fluid to change gears. Every time a gear change is required, the car’s computer activates a transmission solenoid, which directs transmission fluid into the valve body to engage the correct gear. When this is faulty or not working properly, this can cause a delay in gear shifting or in some cases cause the car to not shift at all. This type of problem is amplified any time the transmission is low on fluid creating a drop in hydraulic pressure. I would recommend having a professional from YourMechanic come to your location to diagnose and inspect your vehicle.