Camshaft position sensor error code P0343

I recently purchased this used 2000 BMW 540i., The previous owner claims that service engine light is always on due to error code P0343. 'Camshaft position sensor'. The car runs fairly well. I changed both sensors and the error code persists. The car runs the same, with the new ones or the old ones, same error code. There is no engine modifications. Any idea what is going on?

My car has 150000 miles.
My car has a manual transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hello. The P0343 code indicates there is no signal from the passenger side cam position sensor (Bank 1 actually). Given you have changed the sensor, this would suggest a wiring or connector issue. Your mileage would also make me anxious about timing chain guides, tensioner and timing chain – a chronic maintenance item on BMW V8s with this sort of mileage. While the timing chain service is a bit expensive, the alternative is even more so. I recommend having a certified technician from YourMechanic to thoroughly inspect the Check Engine Light and proceed with the appropriate repair.

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P0343 is an OBD-II generic code for a voltage problem with the camshaft position sensor. This is a fixed electromagnetic sensor that`s connected to a rotating part on the camshaft that records the position of the “teeth” to indicate the stroke of each piston so the computer can apply the appropriate fuel and spark.
The code P0343 means that the PCM detects a problem with the signal coming from the camshaft position sensor. The CMP is important because it`s one of the key sensors that the PCM needs to make the engine run efficiently.
What Is Code P0343 and What Does It Mean? Error code P0343, also known as “Camshaft Position Sensor Circuit High Input,” means a car`s powertrain or engine control module (PCM or ECM) detects a voltage problem from the cam sensor.
Inaccurate camshaft position sensor data can keep fuel injectors open too long, forcing excess fuel into the combustion chamber. This also can cause engine knocking and serious damage if too much liquid gasoline (which does not compress) builds up in the combustion chamber.
Error code P0340 indicates a malfunction with the camshaft position sensor A circuit. This type of malfunction can cause serious issues that require immediate repair because the underlying cause of the code could damage your vehicle`s engine if you continue to drive it.
To test a 3 wire crank sensor, you set your multimeter to DC voltage and use it to collect readings from the signal, reference, and ground wires. If the readings you obtain from these are not in coherence with indications contained in the car manual, then your crank sensor is bad.
P0342 code definition

The PCM (powertrain control module) sets code P0342 when it detects that the camshaft position sensor circuit on engine bank 1 is sending a reading that`s erratic or otherwise outside the manufacturer`s settings. The PCM then illuminates the Check Engine light to alert the driver of the problem.

Unfortunately, there`s no way to reset a camshaft position sensor. If you`re having camshaft issues (check engine light on, acceleration trouble, sputtering and stalling, etc.), you`ll have to replace the part entirely.
Either the throttle position sensor (TPS) or the idle air control valve (IAC) is not working. Check the wiring to the TPS sensor and the IAC valve and see if they are plugged in and if there is any broken or frayed wires. If the wiring looks good and there is no breaks, then start with the TPS sensor.
P0340 is a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) for “Camshaft Position Sensor Circuit Malfunction”. This can happen for multiple reasons and a mechanic needs to diagnose the specific cause for this code to be triggered in your situation.
As a camshaft position sensor weakens, the ECM (Engine Control Module) switches off fuel and spark delivery that can be a dangerous situation. If you ignore the symptoms which your camshaft position sensor fails, or any other listed here, eventually your engine will not start.
If the oil level is very low, to the point where the engine overheats however, yes. Excessive heat can cause a camshaft position sensor to fail. More likely in a “low oil level” situation is for the camshaft, lifters, or camshaft variable timing actuator to fail due to inadequate oil pressure and lubrication.
Camshafts can be rebuilt if they have lobe wear, as long as that wear is not excessive. Above you can see examples of both a rebuildable and non-rebuildable camshaft. The rebuildable camshaft has slight wear. You can see that the wear is not deep and just looks like the cam has been scratched.
Definitely don`t submerge the sensor. Cam/Crank sensors are usually hall-effect magnetic sensors that wear over time due to heat. Cleaning them will not commonly make them work any better.
Car Will Not Start: Over time, as the camshaft position sensor fails, the signal it sends to the engine control module weakens. When the engine no longer receives the signal, you will not be able to start your car. Engine Misfires: A failing camshaft position sensor can cause your engine to misfire.
There are a number of reasons your camshaft sensor might break down: grime and oil in the engine, water damage, bad wiring, and overheating can all cause a camshaft sensor to go bad. The biggest thing to do to avoid this is to take care of your car.
BMW Camshaft Position Sensor – 13627792256 – E70 X5,E90.
While the number can vary based on the age of your car, a new car should have four camshaft sensors, one for each camshaft. A camshaft sensor determines the exact position of your engine`s camshaft, helping your car keep your engine`s combustion running smoothly.
The average cost for camshaft sensor replacement ranges from $105 to $226, depending on whether you go to the mechanic or do it yourself. This price range is based on national averages for all vehicles and does not factor in taxes, fees, or make and model.
No. Driving without a functional crankshaft sensor is dangerous and can cause severe engine damage. If the crankshaft sensor in your car fails, you should repair or replace it quickly as possible.
Diagnostic trouble code (DTC) P0132 stands for “Oxygen Sensor Circuit High Voltage (Bank 1, Sensor 1).” It involves the vehicle`s oxygen sensor, specifically the #1 sensor on Bank 1. This code is triggered when the PCM or powertrain control module detects that your heated oxygen sensor reading is too high.
The CMP sensor measures the exact rotational position and speed and position of the camshaft. The data that the CMP gathers is important because it`s used by the ECM to control the ignition spark and the fuel injector timing.
The short answer is yes, it is safe to drive with a bad camshaft sensor, but it`s not good for your engine long-term. You`ll likely see a higher fuel consumption and poorer engine performance the longer you wait to get it fixed.
The Camshaft Position sensor is typically located in the cylinder head of the engine and has a cylindrical portion that inserts into the head. The Crankshaft Position sensor is normally located in the timing cover or on the side of the block with a cylindrical portion that inserts into the block.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

CHECK ENGINE LIGHT ON
ANSWER : The on board diagnostic (OBD) sets a pending code each time the ECU detects a problem. It confirms the code if it sees the same problem twice. So you’re really only dealing with the two codes : P0016 and 17.These codes are telling you that the timing between the crankshaft and the camshaft are off on Bank 1 (the driver’s side) cylinder bank. This could be a sensor error, a problem in the reluctor ring on the harmonic balancer, or a timing chain problem. Without doing a thorough diagnosis, it’s impossible to say what parts specifically need to be replaced. If you contact Your Mechanic, they can send a technician to your home or office to investigate the codes on you Mercedes and then let you know what it will take to fix it.

Camshaft position sensor error code P0343
ANSWER : Hello. The P0343 code indicates there is no signal from the passenger side cam position sensor (Bank 1 actually). Given you have changed the sensor, this would suggest a wiring or connector issue. Your mileage would also make me anxious about timing chain guides, tensioner and timing chain – a chronic maintenance item on BMW V8s with this sort of mileage. While the timing chain service is a bit expensive, the alternative is even more so. I recommend having a certified technician from YourMechanic to thoroughly inspect the Check Engine Light and proceed with the appropriate repair.

Bad camshaft position sensor?
ANSWER : Hi there. You might find reading this article very helpful in trying to diagnose your P0016 OBD-II trouble code issue. It explains common causes, symptoms and solutions.

I have a 07 Tiburon and showing a code for the camshaft position sensor bank 1. Is there more then 1 camshaft sensor?
ANSWER : The engine in your vehicle is an overhead-cam V6. That means there are camshafts on both sides of the Vee, so to speak. One side of the Vee is considered bank 1, and the other side bank 2. The typical position with a transverse-mounted engine and transmission like in your vehicle would be the front three cylinders you see when you open the hood are considered bank 1. The three cylinders facing the firewall would be considered bank 2. If the sensor for bank 2 has never been replaced, then you should assume it is the same age as the bank 1 sensor. Once verified that the bank 1 camshaft position sensor is at fault, you may want to consider replacing both bank 1 and bank 2 sensors. If they are the same age, the sensor for bank 2 may fail a short time later. Replacing them at the same time, would save you time and costs later.

How many camshaft position sensor are on my 2012 BMW 328I 2.0 turbo
ANSWER : There are two camshaft position sensors on your model. Both position sensors, as well as the crankshaft position sensor, should be tested using an appropriate scan tool or automotive scope to determine if they are functioning. Due to the availability of scan tools and other diagnostic techniques, it is almost never necessary to replace parts on a "trial and error" basis. Also, it is very costly and wasteful to proceed that way. The best thing to do is have the vehicle fault actually diagnosed (pinpointed) and then replace only those parts which are confirmed by testing to be faulty. In your circumstance, the best way to proceed is to request a check engine light diagnostic. A certified mechanic from YourMechanic would use a code scanner to retrieve the specific diagnostic trouble code(s) from your car’s PCM that have caused the check engine light to illuminate. Using those codes, the appropriate individual vehicle components or sub-systems (often a sensor, circuit, and the like) are then carefully tested, based on specifications set forth in your car’s Factory Service Manual, to pinpoint the cause of the fault or the reason why the check engine light has illuminated. Once the faulty part or component is identified, it is explained to your satisfaction and the mechanic will let you know of the cost to repair. If you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to re-contact YourMechanic as we are always here to help you.

I bought camshaft position sensor off of eBay and car is cutting off a lot. Still has check engine light for camshaft position sensor
ANSWER : Hello, thanks for writing in. From my experience with eBay sensors, chances are that it is bad. This happens all of the time with these sensors. A bad crank position sensor can also cause this as well as a failing timing chain. I usually install a computer scan tool to be able to see which codes are coming up and which readings look like they are off. If you would like help, consider having an expert automotive technician from YourMechanic come to your home or office to inspect and diagnose this issue for you, and make or suggest any repairs as needed.

It threw a code 21 , throttle position sensor bad code. i replaced it and the code went away but i still have no spark.
ANSWER : Hello and thank you for contacting YourMechanic. The problems that you are encountering with your vehicle, could be caused by the harness to the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) or the computer itself.

Check the harness to the TPS for any debris or any corrosion. Hook up a paperclip to the harness and turn on the key. Use a multimeter and check for voltage at the pins of the harness. Make sure that the ground on the sensor is grounded and has no resistance. If you find that the harness is having too much resistance, then I recommend having the main engine harness replaced. If you have replaced the harness and still have the same problems, then the computer will need to be flashed or replaced.

I recommend having a professional, like one from YourMechanic, come to your home to diagnose your car’s no start condition before replacing any parts.

Camshaft Position Sensor
ANSWER : Hello, thanks for writing in about your Dodge Challenger. From what you’ve described it sounds like you may have a different sensor than what the auto parts store has listed. If you go to the dealer you would be able to get the correct one. They use your VIN to get the correct parts. If you need assistance with finding the right sensor or installing it, consider YourMechanic, as a certified technician can come to your home and ensure a correct replacement of your camshaft position sensor.