Brake pedal height 4 inches too high.

Took my truck in for a brake job. Got it back and the pedal is 4 inches higher than before (ish). They said it didnt move and said there is no adjustment possible. I have had this truck for 8 yrs. I know my pedals. How do l lower my brake pedal?
Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hi there. There is a lever that is attached to the brake pedal that has an adjustment screw. The screw was pushed out making the brake pedal higher than normal. Turn the screw inward and the pedal height should drop. If your truck has a clevis, then you will have to remove the pin and rotate the clevis inward to lower the pedal and then put the pin back in with a new cotter pin. If you need further assistance with your brake pedal being too high, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

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(1) Disconnect the stop lamp switch connector. (2) Loosen the stop lamp switch by turning it anti-clockwise by approximately 1/8 turn. (3) Loosen the lock nut of operating rod, then turn the serrated section of operating rod using the pliers to adjust the brake pedal height to the standard value.
Brake pedals are higher to prevent accidental accelerator depression when braking. Brake pedals should be adjusted up as the braking material wears away.
The domestic carmakers usually mount the brake pedal higher than the gas pedal. In order to properly engage the brake, a driver must lift a foot higher than to use the gas pedal.
With power brakes, the pedal should stop 1 to 11⁄2 inches from the floor. (If you don`t have power brakes, the pedal should stop more than 3 inches from the floor.)
There are only two plausible reasons for a low pedal: air in the system; and excessive movement between linings and rotors or drums (due to lack of adjustment, an out-of-round drum, or a wobbly disc that`s knocking the pistons back so that there`s extra space to take up before braking action begins).
1) Line pressure can only be increased by either increasing the mechanical pedal ratio or by decreasing the master cylinder diameter. In either case the pedal travel will be increased. 2) Clamping force can only be increased either by increasing the line pressure or by increasing the diameter of the caliper piston(s).
One of the most common reasons for your brakes touching the floor would be an issue with your brake fluid. Your fluid being low or air reaching the brake line will prevent the fluid from flowing properly, resulting in a spongy pedal. A bad brake booster is another common cause for a malfunctioning pedal.
Unless you`re a trained mechanic, there isn`t anything you can do yourself to change your pedal sensitivity. While we know that this likely isn`t the answer you were looking for, it`s important to remember that altering your gas and brake pedals without proper training is incredibly dangerous.
There is some mechanical linkage between the brake pedal and the master brake cylinder. Usually when you want to adjust brake pedal free play it is adjusted somewhere in this mechanical linkage. Very often you might see an adjustable end where the linkage (valve rod) attaches to the master brake cylinder.
A whole variety of adjustments can be made to the pedals of a car, to enable driving or improve the experience. These range from left foot accelerator pedals, to pedal extensions (for those who are struggling to reach the pedals).
There is some mechanical linkage between the brake pedal and the master brake cylinder. Usually when you want to adjust brake pedal free play it is adjusted somewhere in this mechanical linkage. Very often you might see an adjustable end where the linkage (valve rod) attaches to the master brake cylinder.
You can adjust the position of the brake pedal and accelerator pedal when the shift lever is in the Park position. Push the top of the adjustment switch to move the pedals forward, and the bottom to move them backward. To adjust the pedals: Push and hold the top of the adjustment switch until pedals are closest to you.
The brake pedal is sensitive and responds to the pressure accordingly when braking. So, if your brake pedal does not feel firm when depressed and goes all the way down to the floor even when you apply slight pressure, or if it feels mushy, there is a problem.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Supportive bar attached to brake pedal interrupts proper braking process
ANSWER : It’s possible to have someone alter the brake pedal or adapt a brake pedal from a different vehicle. You may call around to some customization shops to see if anyone is interested in taking on the project. But first, I would try reaching out to the selling dealer with your concern – especially since it is a new model. Good luck.

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ANSWER : The brake pedal is working to stop the vehicle, but there may be air in the controller unit causing the ABS brakes to not function. I recommend bleeding the brake system from the farthest location from the master cylinder to the master cylinder including the ABS unit. If the brakes are still spongy after a full bleed, then the controller will need to be replaced. If you need further assistance with your brake pedal being spongy, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

Brake pedal height 4 inches too high.
ANSWER : Hi there. There is a lever that is attached to the brake pedal that has an adjustment screw. The screw was pushed out making the brake pedal higher than normal. Turn the screw inward and the pedal height should drop. If your truck has a clevis, then you will have to remove the pin and rotate the clevis inward to lower the pedal and then put the pin back in with a new cotter pin. If you need further assistance with your brake pedal being too high, then seek out a professional, such as one from Your Mechanic, to help you.

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