Brake noise

Just replaced my front pads and rotors with new from autozone. Ceramic pads and standard rotors. Now the drivers side sounds like a grinding noise when braking in high temperatures. Suggestions?

My car has 230000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Try and drive it for a couple weeks after inspecting to make sure everything was installed correctly. The noise may change after the pads are seated into the rotors. When a pad and rotor are new, they will not match and have rough surfaces from the machining processes and take a couple of weeks to set in all the way. If the pads are still noisy, then you may have gotten a pad that will always be noisy. In that case, ask the parts store if they will replace them or have an independent mechanic inspect the grinding noise and make a repair.

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When the pads and shoes wear down, it can result in a metallic grinding noise, as the backing plate starts making contact with the rotor or drum. Brake pads also have a metal wear indicator that drags on the rotors when the pads are worn out. This will make a grinding or squealing noise.
The noise is just a slight rubbing because your old rotors have been worn in the shape of your old pads, and the new pads don`t match them exactly. But they`re perfectly safe, and your brakes will stop the car just the way they`re supposed to.
Sometimes, new brake pads need to be broken in. Other factors that can contribute to squeaky brakes include dirt and debris on a brake pad, a damaged brake pad backing plate, a bad brake shoe, or weak brake shoe return springs. With so many possible causes, a squeaking or squealing noise can be difficult to diagnose.
However, after replacing your brake pads and rotors, there will be an initial “breaking-in” period, so hearing some grinding isn`t necessarily a cause for concern. It`s pretty standard for a mechanic to grind down rotors ahead of time to lessen this, but grinding sounds might be more noticeable if they didn`t.
Noisy Brakes

If your rotors are faulty, they may produce a squeaking, squealing, or grinding sound when you apply the brakes. Warped rotors usually emit a high-pitched squeak, while severely worn rotors tend to make a scraping noise.

If you`re using semi-metallic pads, you`ll hear some unusual noises. It`s because your rotors are compatible with ceramic pads, not semi-metallic pads. You won`t only notice some noise when there`s incompatibility between the pads and rotors. Your vehicle`s braking performance will also be compromised.
Cleaning your rotors or wheel rims regularly with a specific (oil-free) disc brake degreaser is a good way to avoid squealing brakes. Cleaning your pads too can help quieten things down – you can try some sandpaper or grinding the pads – but if the grease has soaked through the pad, you might need to replace them.
One possible cause is debris or dirt stuck in the brakes, which can create friction and lead to a grinding noise. Another potential reason is a misalignment of the brake calipers, causing them to rub against the rotor instead of smoothly pressing against it.
If you hear your brakes grinding when stopping or slowing down, then your brake pads, or lack thereof, are to blame. Your brakes pads need to be thick enough to ensure optimum performance and stopping power. With time, though, your brake pads can wear down.
It`s an excellent solvent against oil, grease, brake fluid, dried-on dirt and braking residues. It has been specially designed to rapidly dry ensuring it quickly and effectively cleans brakes by letting the solvent disolve the dirt. It improves the performance of the braking systems and stops any grinding noise.
Early on, it might sound like something is rubbing when you let off the brake pedal. Ignore that and you will eventually hear a metallic grinding, scraping, or rubbing sound that indicates metal-on-metal contact in your brake system. A less-common occurrence is the sound of a “clunk” when you hit the brake pedal.
Some common symptoms of bad rotors include vibration or pulsation in the steering wheel, high-pitched squealing noise when braking, shaking steering wheel, brake pedal pulsing, vehicle taking a long time to stop, loud bangs while braking, large edges on the outer part of the brake rotor, and scratch marks on the rotor.
The sound is usually heard when you stop your car, but you may also feel the brake pedal rumble as you step on it. The best way to fix this issue is to have your brake pads replaced immediately, but at this point, you may also need to replace the discs or rotors.
If your brakes are new and still squeaking, the fix may be as simple as greasing the contact points. This requires removing the brake pads from the calipers, then applying brake grease to all the contact points. These locations include the backside of the brake pad and any contact points on the caliper carrier.

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