Boot white smoke exhaust pipe

mix engine coolant oil

My car has 20656 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
This is most likely caused by a blown head gasket that’s leaking coolant into the engine cylinders. Have the cooling system pressure tested to see why oil and coolant is mixing. The cylinders heads are either leaking or cracked. Have a certified technician, like one from YourMechanic, diagnose the leak firsthand if you’re unable to pinpoint it yourself. Best of luck.

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced mechanics :

White or Gray Smoke from Exhaust – Just like if you see white smoke from under the hood, persistent white smoke usually indicates a coolant leak. If there`s only a little bit, it`s probably condensation. Blue Smoke from Exhaust – If you see blue or dark gray smoke, that`s an indication of burning oil.
When the oil leaks into the combustion chamber, it mixes with the fuel and air being ignited and gets blown out of the tailpipe along with them. The result is white or bluish-white smoke. This is a problem because oil does not belong in the combustion chamber.
One possible reason for white smoke coming from your car`s exhaust is that the engine is burning oil. This can happen if the oil level in the engine is low or if the oil seal is leaking. If you notice that your car is burning oil, you should take it to a mechanic to have it checked out.
The most common causes of overheating include low coolant level, a faulty thermostat, a plugged radiator, a faulty radiator pressure cap, collapsed hoses, non functioning cooling fans, and a faulty water pump or drive belt.
Vehicles often produce thin white smoke caused by water vapor and condensation in the exhaust pipe. However, if it`s not condensation, white exhaust smoke is typically caused by an engine coolant leak. This could mean a coolant leakage — going from the coolant system into the combustion chamber.
What Causes Coolant Or Water To Enter The Combustion Chamber? Thick white smoke coming out of the exhaust typically indicates a blown head gasket, a crack in the head, or a crack in the engine block. Cracks and bad gaskets allow the fluid to travel to places it shouldn`t be.
If the smoke from the exhaust pipe is either grey or bluish-tinged, it generally means that your engine is burning oil inside the combustion chamber. Burning oil could be due to a number of causes, from leaky valve seals to bad piston rings.
White smoke usually means coolant is getting into the combustion chambers of your vehicle. This generally happens because of a cracked or leaking head gasket, which allows coolant to seep into your cylinders. In extreme cases, you will need to replace your head gasket.
The most common answer to, “Why is my car smoking but not overheating?” is that there`s a type of fluid that`s landed on the engine. This can be motor oil, fuel, transmission fluid, coolant, or even condensation. It can cause your engine to smoke because it`s burning off that fluid from the engine.
A blown radiator hose spraying coolant onto a hot engine will also produce wispy white smoke that looks like steam. Smoking coolant has a sweet pungent odor and can feel oily if rubbed between your fingers. Blue or gray smoke and a pungent, bitter odor from the tailpipe signal the engine is burning oil.
SHOULD MY EXHAUST SMOKE BE WHITE? In general, thin white exhaust smoke (similar to water vapor) could be nothing to worry about. Depending on the outside temperature, condensation will build up inside of your car`s exhaust system and the heat heading through the pipes will create steam.
The most common cause of white smoke is a coolant leak in your engine. It can`t hurt to check your vehicle for a coolant leak to rule it out. Other causes of white smoke worth checking out include: Cracked or warped cylinder head (this may cause a coolant leak)
White smoke usually means coolant is getting into the combustion chambers of your vehicle. This generally happens because of a cracked or leaking head gasket, which allows coolant to seep into your cylinders. In extreme cases, you will need to replace your head gasket.
Thick white exhaust smoke usually indicates a coolant leak, which could cause overheating and put your engine at a serious risk of damage. If this is the case, call our auto repair shop for an inspection immediately.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

I have white milk coming out of my exhaust pipe but I don’t see it mixing in my oil pan when I check my oil
ANSWER : In most cases, the white smoke is an indicator of coolant finding a way into the combustion chamber. This could happen through a damaged head gasket or a crack in the cylinder head or engine block. Most of the time, this would also be followed by milky oil or overheating problems. However, it could also be a problem with the EGR system, or an extremely rich fuel trim. The best thing to do is have a professional mobile mechanic complete a smoke coming from exhaust inspection, so they can pinpoint the source of your issues and recommend a repair.

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White smoke billows out of exhaust pipe
ANSWER : Hey there. White exhaust smoke is generally indicative of a blown head gasket or other conditions where water or water vapor is getting into the engine. Higher mileage vehicles are especially prone to this potential problem. Have a professional mechanic, such as one from YourMechanic, inspect your engine to pinpoint the issue.

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Thick white smoke from exhaust, change thermostat, fan doesn’t come on, top hose stays cold,
ANSWER : Hello, thanks for writing in about your Geo Storm. If you are getting white smoke from the exhaust then you have a blown head gasket or cracked head. I suggest having a certified mechanic, like one from YourMechanic, diagnose the smoke firsthand by pressure testing the cooling system to see if the head gasket is blown.

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Exhaust piping measure?
ANSWER : You should get the 2.25 x-pipe so it can fit inside the 2.27 exit piping.

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Hello, i had my head gasket repaired and after 8 months it has started making white smoke come from exhaust again and I can smell
ANSWER : Hello, thank you for writing in. With white smoke coming from the exhaust, the smell of coolant, and the (very likely although unmentioned) lowering of the coolant level, it is quite apparent that the coolant is making its way passed the head gasket and into the combustion chambers. Unless you have a cracked head, engine, or other serious damage, the head gasket is very likely the issue. Make sure you are adding coolant to compensate for the loss. Low coolant levels will not give you accurate temperature readings on your dashboard, as the sensor is located at the top and needs to be submerged in liquid to give you an accurate reading. As far as repairing the issue, replace the gasket again, and in the process inspect the old gasket for signs of failure or indications on what caused the leak the second time. If replacing the head gasket again does not solve the problem, you know you have a larger issue with the engine and can take further diagnostics from there. For more help from our technicians, contact our service department to schedule an appointment.

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Car exhaust is giving white smoke when I start the car everyday.
ANSWER : Hi there:

Typically white smoke is an indicator of coolant or liquid other than oil or fuel inside the combustion chambers. This can be caused by a blown head gasket (if you had an overheating issue recently) or simple air to fuel ratio issues caused by a mass air flow sensor or exhaust system sensors not working correctly. The best way to know for certain what’s causing these issues is to have a professional mechanic complete a smoke from engine or exhaust inspection.

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I have white smoke coming out of my exhaust pipe. Could it be a bad ccv?
ANSWER : White smoke makes me worry about the head gasket. If there is coolant getting into the combustion chambers, it makes a nasty smelling white smoke Burning coolant can have a very strong smell, from a sweet kind of odor to a harsh acrid smell that burns your eyes and is usually accompanied by overheating. If that’s what you have you need to check for head gasket or manifold gasket problems. Oil smoke can appear whitish-blue and has an oily smell to it. If you have oil smoke, you could have problems in your crankcase ventilation, valve stem seals, or piston rings. Burning oil will foul the plugs and lead to a misfire. You need to get the source of this smoke checked out. It will probably also be the source of your performance problem. If you contact Your Mechanic, you can have a technician come to your home or office to check out your BMW and advise you as to the next step.

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White smoke coming out from exhaust when throttled.
ANSWER : Hello, thank you for writing in. The lowering of the engine oil is a sign that the oil is being burned in the engine. For the oil to get into the combustion chamber it must pass through a bad piston ring, a bad valve cover gasket, or a failed valve seal. The hotter the engine gets, the oil becomes thinner. The new oil may be seeping through components in which the previous oil was not able to pass. There is also the fact that the different oils lubricate and condition differently, and the sudden change may have lead to a premature deterioration of these gaskets and seals. The engine may need to be pulled in order to perform some of the possible repairs. Further testing will tell if this is needed. For more help resolving the issue, or obtaining a quote, contact our service department.

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