Applying brakes at stop lights and the vehicle slides.

If im sitting at a intersection and i have brakes applied in mud or snow and the vehicle is sliding side ways from a stopped and sitting position and have no gas pedal involved . What is the problem .. could u reply back to
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My car has 175000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

Experienced mechanics share their insights in answering this question :
Hello. If the brakes are staying applied and the wheels are locked but the vehicle begins to slide it is because of the slickness of the roadway. There is not going to be any way to prevent this unless you have better tires that can grip in this condition. Even at that the tires may not take care of it simply because the vehicle is fairly light. If the brakes are not actually holding then the issue may be with the brakes. If the brake drums and rotors are not properly cut when the brakes are done then this can happen. If you want to have your brakes checked out and repaired properly, consider YourMechanic, as a certified mechanic can come to you to [diagnose what is wrong with your brakes] https://www.yourmechanic.com/services/brakes-steering-and-suspension-inspection

How to Identify and Fix Common car Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced mechanics :

Many drivers learned the correct way to stop in an emergency situation where traction is lost and the vehicle slides is by pumping the brakes. While this is correct with conventional brakes, with ABS it is different. Drivers with ABS need to press down hard on the brake pedal, hold it and steer out of danger.
To take full advantage of an ABS`s safety benefits, follow these tips. Do: When you feel or hear the ABS vibrating, press and hold the brake – don`t pump – and steer to safety. Wheel sensors will detect when your car`s tires start to lock, and then repeatedly apply and release the brakes to keep tires from skidding.
The car is most likely sliding sideways because a wheel, or wheels, are locking up – basically functioning as brakes not equipped with an anti-lock system. Anti-lock brakes function by using sensors such as wheel speed sensors to monitor how fast each wheel is spinning.
When the driver brakes sharply, ABS works by sensing when the wheels are about to lock. It then rapidly reduces and increases the braking pressure multiple times per second, applying the optimum pressure. This allows the wheels to keep moving as the car slows down, instead of locking up.
The ABS kicks in when there is heavy or hard braking, regardless of the road conditions. Anytime that you push very hard on the brakes (and are going at speeds over 10-15 mph), the ABS will pump the brake pedal. You will likely feel a slight pulsing sensation in the pedal.
Lastly, to activate ABS is as simple as applying the brake in a sudden and slightly harder manner than usual. You may feel the car “jumping” – which I simply the engagement and release of the braking system at work. This is the mechanical variation of the human equivalent of pumping the brake pedal.
If the rotor is warped or has a variation in thickness, you may find your vehicle shakes when braking, or the steering wheel could shake, or the brake pedal may pulsate. Have your brake system checked and, if a damaged rotor is the problem, the part can be replaced.
If the brake rotors are out of balance or warped, the vehicle can jerk to a stop or rapidly vibrate depending on your driving conditions. If the brake pads are worn or filled with dirt and debris, the area of the rotor under the brake pads can collect these substances, causing the car to pulsate when braking.
An ABS system works by using sensors to calculate each individual wheel`s rotation speed. If the sensors detect one or multiple wheels are rotating at different speeds, it will activate the ABS system to level this out by reducing the brake pressure for that particular wheel(s).
One way to familiarize yourself with the operation of ABS is to test drive the vehicle at a speed above which the ABS activates (usually above 10 mph) in an unobstructed parking lot and apply the brakes firmly.
Without ABS, your front wheels will lock if you brake hard and the car will skid in a straight line, irrespective of what way the front wheels are pointing, unless you release some brake pressure and allow the front wheels to spin again.
ABS works better than non ABS for the average driver, however it is possible to stop faster without ABS for skilled drivers who know how to keep the tires closer to that break point.
In certain cases, depending on the model of vehicle, when the ABS module fails, the brake pedal may become unresponsive. This is an obvious problem, as an unresponsive brake pedal will not stop a vehicle, or will not be able to do so in an adequately safe manner. In most cases, this will happen slowly, over time.
ABS allows the driver to steer his/her vehicle out of potentially damaging situations. The anti-lock brake system is engaged only under potentially dangerous conditions and engages when it detects impending wheel lock. ABS is not engaged under normal braking conditions and it will not impair normal braking actions.
An anti-lock braking system (ABS) is a safety anti-skid braking system used on aircraft and on land vehicles, such as cars, motorcycles, trucks, and buses.
ABS types. There are three basic types of anti-lock braking systems: four-channel/four-sensor, three-channel/three-sensor and one-channel/one-sensor. The best option is the four-channel system because it can micromanage brake action in a skid by pulsing only the affected wheel or wheels.
This may be a variety of things, such as wheels and tires out-of-balance, poor alignment, worn or failing wheel bearings, worn or failing control arm bushings, or worn or failing suspension components. A wheel bearing will usually fail due to pitting or small damage on the surface of the rollers or the bearing race.
When the brake system becomes impaired, it can lead to irreversible damage to the tires. Slamming on the brakes due to worn pads, rotors, and calipers, leads to unbalanced tires. This, in turn, affects the tires, causing them to wear down much faster than they should.
If the caliper is not properly aligned with the rotor, a drag can occur. This is usually caused by a bent caliper mounting bracket or severely warped rotors and pads. To correct, visually inspect the alignment between the caliper and rotor. If the bracket is bent, replace as necessary.
There are two main types of modern ABS systems: three and four channel. Three channel systems control the braking pressure on both front wheels independently, but control the rear wheels together as a single unit.
Usually, the brake fluid level sensor and the parking brake are the only two items that can activate the brake light. But, not all vehicles are the same, and some of the earliest ABS systems would trigger both lights simultaneously for any ABS fault.
When ABS is activated, it pumps your brakes multiple times in succession – much faster than any professional racecar driver can manage. The pulsing you feel is perfectly normal. There is no reason to be worried.
electronic stability control improves vehicle handling and steering. to accomplish this, the abs computer monitors changes in vehicle speed, momentum, steering and acceleration. this information is provided by a number of sensors, including the wheel speed sensors.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

When I put my foot on the brake my back left brake light goes off, when I take it off the brake the brake light comes on
ANSWER : I would suggest trying to disconnect and reconnect the wiring to the rear lights. I have seen these older Toyota vehicles rear lighting short out on the lights themselves due to the way the light circuit was made on the lamp housing. Look at the housing circuit on the light to see if one is touching another, and that could tell you why it is malfunctioning. There could also be a problem with the brake light switch. If you are not comfortable dealing with wires, I recommend getting in touch with a certified mechanic who can look at your brake light issue for you to see what’s going on.

EPC light on 2004 Jetta. Code said brake switch faulty, but brakes lights worked. Replaced brake switch, now no brake lights.
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No dash lights, back right tail light is out, no parking lights. Brake lights work though as does head lights.
ANSWER : Hi there. In many cases, when you have electrical problems like you’re describing, it’s caused by multiple electrical component failure. It’s likely that a few electrical relays are not working; especially if you have systems that utilize the same components (such as your brake light and tail lights). I would recommend having a professional mobile mechanic come to your location to complete an electrical problems inspection first, so they can pinpoint what is damaged and recommend the right repairs.

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I have no brake lights and third brake light I have checked all fuses and brake pedal switch and the switch is fine and I’m still
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signals, daytime running lights are not working, park brake light on dash is on steady and chime is dinging steady 4×4 wont engage
ANSWER : This is likely a brake light switch problem. I would suggest testing the brake light switch which should be located down by the brake pedal. This may also be a computer problem as well as indicated by the other lights on in the dash. I would recommend having an expert from YourMechanic come to your home to possibly replace the brake light switch and diagnose with a scanning tool which will download useful data from the truck’s computer indicating what specifically the problem may be.

I replaced the brake light switch. Gear lever unlocked because it had locked. Now the brakes feel hard.
ANSWER : Hi, thanks for writing in. You need to check the brake switch install adjustment. You may have the switch adjusted too tight and it is holding the the brake pedal partly down. This will cause the brake master cylinder to not release the brakes when you let off the pedal. Readjust the switch away from the pedal until you feel some free play again in the pedal. This should fix the problem. If you would like help, consider having an expert automotive technician from YourMechanic come to your home or office to inspect and diagnose this issue for you, and make or suggest any repairs as needed.