A ticking sound comes from the engine after start up but it goes away after the engine warms up.

a ticking sound comes from the engine after startup that eventually goes away after the engine warms up. the dealer told me it was an exhaust manifold problem. is the possibly true? what does it entail to fix? and how much would it cost?

My car has 117000 miles.
My car has an automatic transmission.

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The ticking sound is commonly caused by opening and closing valves or rocking arms. This could mean the car is low on oil or there is a problem with the oil delivery system that needs to be repaired. The noise can go away once the parts are properly lubricated.
A: If the ticking noise disappears after the engine warms up, it could be that the valve train is making that noise until enough oil reaches it. Check to make sure that you have the right oil viscosity for colder weather.
This happens as the lifters are moving without oil initially. As the engine warms up and oil circulates back up to the top of the motor where the lifters are and they begin to pump up full of oil, the ticking sound should become lighter and eventually go away.
If the ticking noises remain, the issue may be due to the oil pressure. Meanwhile, if the noise goes away after revving the engine, it`s likely you have an exhaust leak. Leaks on the exhaust manifold may point to different causes including bad manifold bolts or studs, a blown gasket, or a cracked or damaged manifold.
A rapid clicking noise when trying to start your car could mean there`s something wrong within the electrical system. Perhaps your battery`s dead, or your alternator, which charges the battery, isn`t working correctly.
Exhaust system is cooling down – This is the most common noise you hear when you shut the engine off. Metals expand when heated and contract when cooled down.
Dirty fuel injectors can lead to a ticking noise in the engine because they can lead to misfires producing a ticking noise. Misfires occur when the air-fuel mixture in the combustion chamber fails to ignite or ignites at the wrong time. This situation causes a momentary loss of power and a ticking noise.
If you suspect there may be a component ticking, one method for diagnosis is to remove the drive belt and hand-spin each component. If nothing is still suspect, start the engine and immediately listen to see if the tick has disappeared.
When the timing belt starts to wear out, it may create a ticking sound inside the motor. This warning sign may also be an indication of low oil pressure or the engine not having the proper amount of lubrication.
How Can You Quiet Your Car Engine? Once you verify the lifter ticking is not caused by a worn-out lifter or some other damaged part, the best thing to do is change the oil. Get rid of all the oil currently in the engine and flush it out before adding new oil.
Another common reason that your engine may start ticking is that your oil levels are simply too low. Low oil levels can cause many of the same problems as dirty and contaminated oil. Without the proper level of oil for lubrication, hydraulic lifters will suffer in function.
Possible Causes of Starter Motor Failure

If your starter motor clicks more than once when you attempt to get your car running, there are several possible causes: A weak battery. Loose, damaged, or corroded battery cables. A faulty starter solenoid or relay.

Lifter Ticking

Often, a lifter tick will be most prevalent as soon as you start the engine, and may get quieter or disappear completely as the engine warms up.

Possible Causes of Starter Motor Failure

If your starter motor clicks more than once when you attempt to get your car running, there are several possible causes: A weak battery. Loose, damaged, or corroded battery cables. A faulty starter solenoid or relay.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

at a cold start there’s a ticking sound from under the hood until the car warms up.once the car is warm the ticking sound is gone
ANSWER : This noise is likely due to the engine wearing out over time. It is possible that the wrong viscocity of oil was used at the last oil change. I would recommend ensuring that the correct oil was used last time the oil was changed. You can do this by checking your records or if you chage it yourself you may know if the oil is correct or not. If the oil is the correct viscosity, I would recommend using Lucas oil stabilizer as this product was made specifically to deal with this exact issue. You can find it at the local auto parts store.

My Toyota is making a noise when I start the engine and bogs the engine down for a second then goes away.
ANSWER : Hi there. A binding accessory could be causing your concern. Simply remove the drive belt and recheck. If the problem goes away, this eliminates the fear that there could be something goin on with the engine or transmission internally. It sounds like this could be the water pump. If the water pump is binding or leaking, it can cause the belt to slip and make it seem like the engine gets bogged down. Usually a visual inspection quickly uncovers the leak. However a properly executed pressure test is the best way to uncover leaks, both current and potential. I suggest having a qualified technician perform an inspection to avoid replacing unnecessary parts. Your Mechanic has several available technicians that can assist you with a car is making a noise inspection.

Engine tapping noise related to short term fuel trim but only on cold start up.
ANSWER : Has a mechanic’s stethoscope been used to track down the specific location of the noise? There are several solenoid valves in the engine bay that do not run all the time and may be pretty loud once they start, such as an evaporative emissions purge valve and the like. The high fuel trims on one bank sound like you may have a problem on one side with a vacuum leak. A positive trim means air is being added and the computer is trying to add fuel to compensate.

I recommend having an experienced technician, such as one from YourMechanic, come to your location to determine why the engine is making a noise and suggest the proper repair.

Chizzling sound when start of acceleration, sound goes away after car is on the move.
ANSWER : Hi there. Weird sounds underneath the vehicle are often very difficult to diagnose over the internet. Typically noises in general are caused by loose or damaged components that are rattling as the vehicle is warming up. A certified technician from YourMechanic can come to your car’s location to inspect the noise by test driving the vehicle and experiencing the sound firsthand in order to pinpoint the source.

Intermittent ticking sound from front of engine
ANSWER : If the ticking sound seems to be dependent on temperature, I might suggest taking a look for an exhaust leak somewhere. Small exhaust leaks will normally begin when cold and diminish as the engine warms, but in my experience, I have seen exhaust manifolds and pipe connections that will respond in the opposite, like you are describing. I’m not sure if this is the case in your situation, but it is another credible place to look.

Check Engine Light comes on after starting pickup
ANSWER : Hello there, thank you for asking about your 1992 Isuzu Pickup. A professional will have the correct equipment to read OBD1 codes. Retrieving the diagnostic trouble code(s) is the first place to start when diagnosing your vehicle. Increasing RPMs changes engine load, which can in turn affect many different sensors and components, causing the Check Engine Light to illuminate. The only way to narrow down the options and find the culprit is through in person diagnosis with an OEM compatible scan tool. A certified technician from YourMechanic can retrieve the OBD codes at your home or office.

Fuel pump engages. Batery good, alternator good volts, jump start helps when wont start. Temp does not matter. Intermittent?
ANSWER : Hello. Thank you for writing in. There are several reasons your vehicle may only start when jump starting. The first and most common is a build up of resistance that is causing you to need a boost of voltage to get the engine started. This may be due to poor battery cables, a bad ground connection, a poor starter solenoid, and a couple of other issues. The first thing you want to do is perform a visual inspection of the starting system. Make sure there is no corrosion build up in the battery cables. You can also check the resistance across these wires and make sure you have a solid connection between components. You then want to make sure the starter solenoid is doing its job. It is responsible for taking the small amount of electricity sent by the ignition and turning it into a huge electrical charge that is strong enough to push over the engine with the help of some gear ratios in its favor. Do some more testing, and stick to the basics before assuming its something seriously complicated.

My engine has a ticking knocking type of sound. It runs fine not buring oil or losing coolent. Sounds like the valves taping
ANSWER : On a 1998 engine with 147,000 miles, the noise could come from anywhere. I typically check the engine oil level when cool to verify it is correct. Then, I run the engine for 5 minutes, shut it off, and check the engine oil level again.

If after running it for a short time and the engine oil level is lower, then it is likely you have a sludge build-up in your oil return passages preventing oil from draining back to the oil pan. If so, maybe an engine oil flush is in order. At the mileage, sometimes an oil flush may do harm to your piston rings or may help. You never really know.

If the oil level is correct after running the engine, you should have an oil pressure gauge connected to the engine to verify that it is within specifications to factory numbers to verify the oil pump is working properly.

An engine tapping noise could be anything from connecting rods on the crankshaft to an engine valve lifter. If the noise is a knock-knock in a repetitive motion at a slow speed, I would suspect lower engine problem, like a connecting rod (which requires a complete engine rebuild). If the noise is at a higher frequency, then I would think you have a valve issue which could be repaired at a much lower cost.

Based upon mileage, the feeling of how the engine runs, engine codes (if any), and an unknown level of maintenance, it is difficult to determine the exact issue. You may need an engine repair, a new engine, more oil, an oil pump, or just live with it. I’d have a certified mechanic take a look at it to diagnose and fix the sound that’s coming from your engine.